Jack Butler brings his National Review colleague Jimmy Quinn back to the show to attempt to solve the dual problem of corporations that advance left-wing pieties at home but roll over for the Chinese Communist Party abroad (and also at home).

Jack brings his National Review colleague Cameron Hilditch back to the show and attempts to force him to take a side on the plausibility of recent UFO revelations. The two then ponder the theological implications of possible extraterrestrial life, and wonder whether one should baptize an extraterrestrial.

Isaac Schorr returns to go over the somewhat dispiriting results of a YAF poll that revealed the extent of young people’s liberalism, and to try to figure out what, if anything, can be done about it.

Madeleine Kearns rejoins Jack to discuss her problems with the growing marijuana industry, one that would rather ignore a growing body of evidence that the increasingly popular and legal drug has some serious negative consequences for users.

Jack is joined by his National Review colleague Mark Antonio Wright, who, in the course of his (relatively) young life, has spent time living in Mexico, roughnecking in oil fields, serving in the Marines, and, now, attempting to give advice to young people with his new “Vitruvian Life” column for NRO. If you’re a young person with questions you want him to answer, email Vitruvian.Life@nationalreview.com.

After a long delay for which he offers profuse apologies, Jack returns to the podcast with his National Review colleague Isaac Schorr to mock Joe Biden’s goals for a return to normal life (maybe the Fourth of July? Are you kidding?), goals that seem disconnected from reality but definitely connected to the now year-long pattern of government bureaucrats wanting to tell us what to do.

Jack brings on Reason editor Robby Soave to discuss the struggle (against . . . teachers?) to reopen schools, and the terrible consequences for kids — you know, the people the schools are supposed to be for — of their being closed.

Jack interviews Andrew Egger and Audrey Fahlberg, two writers for The Dispatch who witnessed the chaos at Capitol Hill last Wednesday firsthand, to get a full account of what happened.

For the last episode of 2020, Jack goes shockingly topical, inviting his friend Noah Weinrich, a Georgia native, to discuss and — with some cajoling — predict what will happen in his home state’s upcoming Senate runoff elections.

Jack brings on his National Review colleague Alexandra DeSanctis to discuss why Pornhub is evil, and what we can do about it and the broader pornography epidemic, even as porn itself grows in social acceptability.

With the tenth anniversary of Kanye West’s album My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy upon us, Jack takes the opportunity to discuss the music and the persona of its creator with Kanye enthusiast George Messenger.

Taking a break from politics, Jack brings back his friend, budding exercise scientist Brady Holmer, to talk about what the “runner’s high” really is, how it doesn’t mean that running is all hunky-dory, and how to deal with running-related setbacks.

Don’t let the rancor of the election mislead you: America is awesome. But sometimes it takes an outsider to be truly persuasive, so Jack brings on his National Review colleague Cameron Hilditch, currently living in Northern Ireland, to explain why he loves America and why its critics are mistaken. Along the way, they also converse about Lord of the Rings, the merits of Tennessee, and other topics.

Jack brings on Citizens’ Climate Lobby Conservative Fellow Nate Hochman to hear out Nate’s case for a conservative climate change agenda.

If young conservatives are our future, should we sell our bonds? Former Cornell University College Republicans president and current National Review ISI Fellow talks about campus conservatism and assesses the current debate about the future of the right, particularly as it pertains to young people.

Does the cancellation of 18th-century philosopher David Hume portend ill for the future of Western civilization? Jack brings his National Review colleague Daniel Tenreiro on to discuss.

Jack brings back his now-colleague Madeleine Kearns to discuss Harry Potter and the increasingly un-woke status of the books’ author, J.K. Rowling (increasingly, to the left, She-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named).

Ignoring the Democratic National Convention — like everyone else is anyway — Jack invites his National Review colleague Jimmy Quinn to explain what TikTok is and why it’s worrisome, and to ponder the extent of Chinese Communist Party influence on American college campuses.

Anders Hagstrom returns to the show to discuss the Big Tech menace (?), the Tik Tok menace (!), and the pleasures of video games (?!?).

On his 27th birthday, Jack flies solo with a raw, unedited podcast–recorded and released almost instantly–and answers listener questions on topics from sci-fi to Straussianism while also complaining that Ringo Starr won’t retweet him even though they share a birthday.