Jack starts out the new year in appropriate Janus fashion, employing the aid of budding foreign-policy guru Jimmy Quinn to look back on the year that was in China news concering three areas (Uyghur genocide, Winter Olympics, Taiwan) and to take a guess at what this year might bring in each one.

Jack ends the year with young econ expert Dominic Pino to make sense of the supply-chain and inflation crises that have beset America in 2021 and to try to ascertain whether they’ll stick with us in 2022.

Jack goes solo again to ruminate upon the best movies, songs, and things about Christmas.

RealClearPolitics White House correspondent Phil Wegmann returns to Young Americans to suss out the rumors about the 2024 presidential shadowboxing between Vice President Kamala Harris and Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg. (There’s also a little talk about Dune.)

It’s a conversation about all things critical theory, with returning guest and teacher Daniel Buck. It’s full of wisdom about why critical race theory is bad and what to teach instead, and full of digressions about ISIS and random Twitter accounts. Perhaps you’ll enjoy some of it.

To mark the release of the new Dune movie (which he has not yet seen), Jack flies solo to answer some of your questions about how he turned into the world’s most annoying Dune fan, what he likes about the series, what his favorite moments and characters from the books are, and more. There’s also a photoshop request, if anyone’s willing . . .

O.G. Young American Alec Dent returns to the show for a discussion of No Time To Die: Its Millennial character, whether it succumbed to wokeness, whether modern pop culture will allow the continued existence of James Bond, and more.

RealClearPolitics White House correspondent Phil Wegmann (note the second ‘n’) joins Jack to dish on his, er…fourth-row seat witnessing the struggles of the Biden administration. They also chat about Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, Aristotle, and . . . drinking water? Give it a listen.

On the 20th anniversary of 9/11, Jack brings Nic Rowan back to the show for a conversation about the day: Their memories of it as it happened, the cultural effects, its ultimate historical legacy, and more.

Wisconsin teacher and fellow Millennial/runner Daniel Buck joins Jack to discuss some of the challenges of being an educator in a time of coronavirus and wokeness.

Young Northern Irishman Cameron Hilditch returns to the show to swat away resurgent fantasies about 20th-century Portugese dictator Antonio Salazar.

Jack brings back his NR colleague Isaac Schorr to examine what the heck is going on with the schism at the College Republican National Committee.

With Jack temporarily out of the news cycle, he asks Brady Holmer, his fitness-expert friend and fellow runner and podcast host, to talk about something a bit removed from the headlines (though not entirely): America’s obesity epidemic. They discuss how bad it is, how it got so bad, and what, if anything, can be done about it.

With everyone talking about Big  Tech these days, Jack brings on his National Review colleague Daniel Tenreiro to discuss whether the companies are monopolies, what (if anything) should be done about their business practices, which anti-Big-Tech arguments hold water and which don’t, and more.

Jack Butler brings his National Review colleague Jimmy Quinn back to the show to attempt to solve the dual problem of corporations that advance left-wing pieties at home but roll over for the Chinese Communist Party abroad (and also at home).

Jack brings his National Review colleague Cameron Hilditch back to the show and attempts to force him to take a side on the plausibility of recent UFO revelations. The two then ponder the theological implications of possible extraterrestrial life, and wonder whether one should baptize an extraterrestrial.

Isaac Schorr returns to go over the somewhat dispiriting results of a YAF poll that revealed the extent of young people’s liberalism, and to try to figure out what, if anything, can be done about it.

Madeleine Kearns rejoins Jack to discuss her problems with the growing marijuana industry, one that would rather ignore a growing body of evidence that the increasingly popular and legal drug has some serious negative consequences for users.

Jack is joined by his National Review colleague Mark Antonio Wright, who, in the course of his (relatively) young life, has spent time living in Mexico, roughnecking in oil fields, serving in the Marines, and, now, attempting to give advice to young people with his new “Vitruvian Life” column for NRO. If you’re a young person with questions you want him to answer, email Vitruvian.Life@nationalreview.com.

After a long delay for which he offers profuse apologies, Jack returns to the podcast with his National Review colleague Isaac Schorr to mock Joe Biden’s goals for a return to normal life (maybe the Fourth of July? Are you kidding?), goals that seem disconnected from reality but definitely connected to the now year-long pattern of government bureaucrats wanting to tell us what to do.