This week on Banter, we’re joined by AEI Senior Fellow Karlyn Bowman to discuss the 2018 midterm elections, including what the latest polls are showing about the chances of a blue wave this November and how big of a factor Trump will be for voters. At AEI, Bowman analyzes American public opinion using available polling data on a variety of subjects and speaks frequently about the evolution of American politics due to key demographic and geographic changes.

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This week on Banter, we’re joined by president of the Herzl Institute in Jerusalem, Dr. Yoram Hazony, to discuss his new book “The Virtue of Nationalism.” Hazony relies extensively on history, political philosophy, and theology to argue that nationalism isn’t the threat it’s recently been made out to be, but rather, a beacon of hope for humanity and the best way to organize our global political system.

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This week on Banter, we’re joined by former Portuguese Europe Minister Bruno Maçães to discuss his new book “The Dawn of Eurasia.” Maçães argues that the new global order can best be described as ‘Eurasian’ and highlights the importance of thinking on a super-continental scale. Maçães is currently a Senior Advisor at Flint Global in London and Senior Fellow at Renmin University, Beijing and the Hudson Institute in Washington.

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This week on Banter, we’re joined by the Wall Street Journal’s Matthew Hennessey to discuss his new book “Zero Hour for Gen X: How the Last Adult Generation Can Save America from Millennials.” Generation X consists of people born roughly between 1965 and 1980. Sandwiched between the Baby Boomers and tech-obsessed Millennials, Gen X is smaller than either cohort and, according to Hennessey, is the only generation that can stand up and resist utopian Silicon Valley visionaries, the Internet of Things, and addiction to technology.

Zero Hour for Gen X: How the Last Adult Generation Can Save America from Millennials | Matthew Hennessey | Encounter Books | August 14, 2018

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This week on Banter, we’re joined by AEI Visiting Fellow Michael Mazza to discuss his new report “An American Strategy for Southeast Asia.” The report discusses the importance of the region and how the United States can design and implement a comprehensive strategy to promote peace, free-market economics, and liberal democracy. Mazza hosted an AEI public event this week to release the report, which featured remarks from Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asian and Pacific Security Affairs Randall Schriver. You can access both the report and the full event video at the links below:

An American Strategy for Southeast Asia | Michael Mazza | American Enterprise Institute | August 7, 2018

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This week on Banter, we’re joined by AEI Research Fellow Dalibor Rohac to discuss how populism in Europe and the United States has weakened core transatlantic institutions such as the European Union (EU) and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). Rohac recently co-authored a new report with AEI Senior Vice President for Foreign and Defense Policy Danielle Pletka and Center for American Progress Senior Fellow Vikram Singh titled “Partnership in Peril: The Populist Assault on the Transatlantic Community,” which puts forth an agenda for how key transatlantic partnerships can be reinvigorated in a politically sustainable, even populist, way. You can read the full report below.

Partnership in Peril: The Populist Assault on the Transatlantic Community | Danielle Pletka, Dalibor Rohac, and Vikram Singh | AEI and the Center for American Progress | July 31, 2018

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This week on Banter, we’re joined by AEI’s Wilson H. Taylor Scholar in Health Care and Retirement Policy Joe Antos to discuss the cost of prescription drugs. Dr. Antos recently published a report with his AEI colleague Jim Capretta titled “Prescription Drug Pricing: An Overview of the Legal, Regulatory, and Market Environment.” The paper discusses the existing arrangements that contribute to drug costs and offers several reforms that might relieve the financial burden that high prices can sometimes place on patients. You can read the full paper below.

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This week on Banter, we’re joined by Ed DeMarco to discuss the history of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, these entities’ role in the 2008 housing market crash, and how (and if) Fannie and Freddie could be reformed. From September 2009 to January 2014, Dr. DeMarco served as acting director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, conservator for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and regulator of those companies and the Federal Home Loan Banks. Today, he serves as the president of the Financial Services Roundtable’s Housing Policy Council and a senior fellow in residence at the Milken Institute’s Center for Financial Markets. He participated in an AEI public event hosted by AEI Resident Fellow Ed Pinto on whether Fannie and Freddie should be expanding or shrinking their activities. You can watch the full event video at the link below.

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This week on Banter, AEI Visiting Fellow Jay Cost joins the show to discuss his new book “The Price of Greatness: Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and the Creation of American Oligarchy.” The book describes the fractious relationship between Alexander Hamilton and James Madison. After working together to advocate for the ratification of the Constitution, Hamilton and Madison became bitter rivals with Hamilton emphasizing economic growth and Madison the importance of republican principles. The book has important lessons for how we balance nationalism and republicanism today. Dr. Cost hosted a release event for the book at AEI. You can watch the full event video and read Jay’s recent National Affairs piece at the links below.

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This week on Banter, AEI resident fellow Jason Delisle joined the show to discuss the role of inspectors general in the Department of Education and their influence on policy debates. He also discussed his new report on graduate schools with the lowest rates of student loan repayment. Delisle’s work at AEI focuses on higher education financing and student loan programs. You can read his piece on the inspectors general and the graduate schools report at the links below.

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This week on Banter, AEI’s John H. Makin Visiting Scholar Eric Hanushek discusses the relationship between teacher cognitive skills and student achievement. Dr. Hanushek’s research finds that there are substantial differences in teacher cognitive skills across countries that are related to student performance. Dr. Hanushek will soon publish a new academic paper in the Journal of Human Resources on the subject. You can read the full paper and listen to Dr. Hanushek’s appearance on the “Political Economy” podcast with Jim Pethokoukis at the links below.

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This week on Banter, AEI Visiting Scholar Rick Geddes joins the show to discuss hyperloop technology. Geddes has written extensively about how hyperloop technology could dramatically reduce travel time in the United States as well as the regulatory, environmental, and financial challenges such a system would need to overcome. Geddes hosted a public event at AEI headquarters on hyperloop in April. You can view the full event video below.

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This week on Banter, AEI Visiting Fellow Naomi Schaefer Riley joined the show to discuss the opioid epidemic’s strain on our foster care system and possible solutions to improve the lives of affected children. Riley cohosted an event at AEI featuring a keynote from Arizona Governor Doug Ducey on the severity of the opioid crisis in Arizona and its effect on foster care families, followed by an expert panel discussion on what policies can best serve the interests of children affected by drug abuse. You can watch the full event video at the link below.

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This week on Banter, AEI Research Fellow Phill Lohaus joins the show to discuss the security environment in the Asia Pacific. Phill is cohosting an event with his colleague Tom Donnelly on June 1 featuring a panel of security experts discussing how the United States can keep its competitive edge in the Asia Pacific. You can livestream the event or catch the full event video at the link below.

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This week on Banter, Yossi Klein Halevi joined the show to discuss his new book, Letters to My Palestinian Neighbor, which explores the Israeli/Palestinian conflict through Israeli eyes. In a series of letters, he outlines the difficult choices that both Israelis and Palestinians must face if there is ever to be a chance of lasting peace in the region. Halevi is an American-born journalist and senior fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem. His other books include At the Entrance to the Garden of Eden: A Jew’s Search for God with Christians and Muslims in the Holy Land and Like Dreamers: The Story of the Israeli Paratroopers Who Reunited Jerusalem and Divided a Nation.

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This week on Banter, AEI Resident Fellow at the Marilyn Ware Center for Security Studies Mackenzie Eaglen joined the show to discuss her latest white paper “Defense Budget Peaks in 2019, Underfunding the National Defense Strategy,” which analyzes President Trump’s second defense budget. She argues that this budget misses the mark on suggestions made in her report from earlier this year, “Repair and Rebuild: Balancing New Military Spending for a Three-Theater Strategy.” Eaglen has worked on defense issues in the House of Representatives and Senate and at the Pentagon in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and on the Joint Staff. You can read both reports at the links below.

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This week on Banter, Dr. William Galston joins the show to discuss his new book Anti-Pluralism: The Populist Threat to Liberal Democracy. Dr. Galston serves as the Ezra K. Zilkha Chair in the Governance Studies Program at the Brookings Institution. He is a former policy adviser to President Bill Clinton. The book describes populist movements in the United States and Europe and the economic, cultural, and societal factors that led us to this moment. Dr. Galston concludes the book with several policy recommendations that might stem the populist tide and strengthen liberal democracy.

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This week on Banter, AEI Visiting Scholar and Director of Agriculture Studies Vincent Smith joined the show to discuss the history of US agriculture policy and provisions of the 2018 Farm Bill, including farm subsidies and SNAP work requirement measures. Dr. Smith is a Professor of Economics in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Montana State University and co-director of MSU’s Agricultural Marketing Policy Center. He hosted a public event at AEI on the 2018 Farm Bill including what it means for the future of farm subsidies and US agriculture productivity. You can watch the full event video at the link below.

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This week on Banter, Michael Strain and Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach joined the show to discuss the importance of the 2020 census and the challenges to its implementation, including a lack of funding and a controversial proposal to include a question on US citizenship. Dr. Strain is the John G. Searle Scholar and director of economic policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute. Previously, he worked in the Center for Economic Studies at the US Census Bureau. Dr. Schanzenbach serves as director of the Institute for Policy Research and is a faculty fellow and the Margaret Walker Alexander Professor in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University. Drs. Strain and Schanzenbach contributed to a 2017 report, “In Order That They May Rest Their Argument on Facts: the Vital Role of Government-Collected Data,” and participated in a public event at AEI this week on the significance of the 2020 Census. You can watch the full event video and read the report at the links below.

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This week on Banter, AEI Resident Scholar Nat Malkus joins the show to discuss the DC Public Schools graduation scandal. After posting a record graduation rate in 2017, an audit revealed that one-third of graduates received diplomas in violation of the District’s attendance policy. If the District’s attendance policy had been followed, the graduation rate would have fallen from 73 percent to less than 50 percent. What implications does this have for education reform and what systems should be developed to ensure this doesn’t happen in the future? Read more about the scandal at the links below.

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