Does America need venture capital to achieve high rates of economic growth? How can budding start-ups get it? And what do the big tech firms of the future look like to investors today? On this episode, Andreessen Horowitz’s Scott Kupor discusses his new book “Secrets of Sand Hill Road: Venture Capital and How to Get It.”

Scott Kupor is managing partner at the Silicon Valley based venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. He also teaches courses on venture capital and corporate governance at Stanford Law School and the Haas School of Business at UC Berkley.

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What does Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal get wrong about lowering carbon emissions? What is ecomodernism? And how can nuclear power play a roll in our high energy future? On this episode, the Breakthrough Institute’s Alex Trembath discusses how we can achieve a high-growth, high-energy future with a smaller carbon footprint.

Alex Trembath is the Deputy Director of the Breakthrough Institute, where he helps coordinate Breakthrough’s research on technological solutions to environmental and human development challenges. You can download the episode by clicking the link above, and don’t forget to subscribe to my podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. Tell your friends, leave a review.

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Is the US falling behind China and the world in innovation and technology? Why doesn’t America expand public funding for scientific research? And what stops the government and private sector from investing in ideas that could eventually be worth billions? On this episode, economics professor Jonathan Gruber discusses his new book “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth and the American Dream.”

Jonathan Gruber is the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. Jonathan has long been involved in crafting public health policy, and is considered a key architect of both Romneycare and Obamacare.

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Why do we love to hate big business? Are American corporations monopolistic? Are CEOs overpaid? And is Big Tech really a threat to our democracy? On this episode, economics professor Tyler Cowen discusses his new book “Big Business: A Love Letter to an American Anti-Hero.”

Tyler Cowen is the Holbert L. Harris Chair of Economics at George Mason University and the faculty director of GMU’s Mercatus Center. He is also the coauthor of the wildly popular economics blog Marginal Revolution. You can download the episode by clicking the link above, and don’t forget to subscribe to my podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. Tell your friends, leave a review.

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What is a ‘loonshot’? Why are they so often dismissed? And how can teams, companies, and governments nurture more of these great ideas? On this episode, author and biotechnology entrepreneur Safi Bahcall discusses his new book “Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries.”

After working as a consultant for McKinsey, Safi Bahcall co-founded the biotechnology company Synta Pharmaceuticals, serving as its CEO for 13 years. In 2011 he worked with the President Obama’s Council of Science Advisors on how to transform the future of US science and technology research.

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Should we be so pessimistic about the role of technology in our lives? Has 5G been overhyped? And when will autonomous cars be a reality for consumers? On this episode, Andreessen Horowitz’s Benedict Evans discusses why we respond the way we do to technological change and where the tech industry is taking us next.

Benedict Evans is a partner at the Silicon Valley venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz (‘a16z’) and also runs a popular email newsletter.

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Does allowing Huawei to build Europe’s 5G network pose a threat to international security? And to what lengths should the US go to help Huawei’s European competitors? On this episode, AEI’s Claude Barfield discusses the race to build the world’s 5G backbone and how the Trump administration should police Chinese intellectual property theft.

Claude Barfield is a resident scholar at AEI and a former consultant to the office of the US Trade Representative. He has written extensively about 5G, China, and Huawei.

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Will artificial intelligence (AI) lead to a jobless economy? Can AI stimulate lasting economic growth? Is anti-competitive behavior by big tech slowing the rate of AI innovation? On this episode, Professor Robert Seamans discusses AI’s impact on the economy, how it will change the nature of work, and whether regulation is needed to keep the AI industry competitive.

Robert Seamans is an associate professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business and a former Senior Economist at the White House Council of Economic Advisors. Most recently, he coauthored the chapter “AI and the Economy” with Jason Furman.

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Has Big Tech become a barrier to innovation? Who owns the data you generate while surfing the web? And should you get paid when a company uses that data for targeted ads? On this episode, Neil Chilson discusses the economics of privacy, the complexities of content moderation, and whether Big Tech has become anticompetitive.

Neil Chilson is a former Federal Trade Commission (FTC) acting Chief Technologist and a current senior research fellow for technology and innovation at the Charles Koch Institute. Prior to joining the FTC, Chilson practiced telecommunications law at Wilkinson Barker Knauer, LLP.

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Ever since the new Democratic majority was seated in the House and the 2020 Democratic presidential primary got underway, numerous proposals have emerged to increase taxes on America’s wealthiest. But is a two percent tax on wealth over $50 million as small as it sounds? And what are the disincentive effects of Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s 70% top tax rate? On this episode, AEI’s Alan Viard walks us through how to think about some of the new tax policy proposals emerging out the Democratic presidential primary race.

Alan Viard is a resident scholar here at AEI, where he researches federal tax and budget policy. He earned his PhD in economics from Harvard University, has worked as a senior economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, and was a senior economist at the White House’s Council of Economic Advisers.

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On this episode, podcaster and serial entrepreneur Brian McCullough discusses the rise of the early internet companies, the dot-com bubble, and whether today’s Big Tech companies poses a threat to Silicon Valley’s tradition of innovation.

Brian McCullough is the host of the daily tech news podcast Techmeme Ride Home, as well as the Internet History Podcast. He’s also the founder of WhereAreTheJobs.com, WhoToTalkTo.com, and ResumeWriters.com. His latest book is “How the Internet Happened: From Netscape to the iPhone.”

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Will Made in China 2025 succeed in making China the world’s leading producer of high value technology? Is China really a threat to the world’s industrialized economies? On this episode, George Magnus discusses four “red flags” that may complicate China’s plans for growth­.

George Magnus is an associate at the China Centre at the Oxford University, a research associate at the School of Oriental and African Studies, and a former chief economist for UBS. His latest book is “Red Flags: Why Xi’s China is in Jeopardy.”

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Have we entered a new Gilded Age? Are Facebook, Google, and Apple today’s Standard Oil, Northern Securities Company, and US Steel? On this episode, professor Tim Wu discusses the history and legacy of antitrust law in America, as well as whether it’s time to break up big-tech.

Tim Wu is a professor at Columbia Law School where he focuses on antitrust, copyright, and communications law. His latest book is “The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age.”

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Is Sen. Bernie Sanders’ ‘Medicare for All’ proposal really Medicare for all? And what are the real costs associated with single-payer health care? On this episode, AEI’s Benedic Ippolito discusses the oft ignored implications of the health care plans popular among 2020 Democratic presidential hopefuls.

Benedic Ippolito is a research fellow in economic policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute where he focuses on health economics.

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Should we worry about the size of the trade deficit? How do we bring back American manufacturing? Why aren’t wages growing more quickly? On this episode, economics professor and BBC presenter Linda Yueh discusses how twelve of the world’s greatest economists might respond to these questions and more.

Linda Yueh is an Adjunct Professor of Economics at the London Business School, an Associate Fellow at Chatham House, and a TV and radio presenter for the BBC. Her latest book is “What Would the Great Economists Do? How Twelve Brilliant Minds Would Solve Today’s Biggest Problems.”

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has said it “absolutely” should be part of our conversation about the economy. During the presidential campaign, Sen. Bernie Sanders’ chief economist was an adherent. But what the heck is Modern Monetary Theory? On this episode, economist and AEI scholar Stan Veuger breaks it all down, discussing his latest article for AEI Economic Perspectives titled Modern Monetary Theory and Policy.

Stan Veuger is a resident scholar here at AEI where he specializes in political economy and public finance.

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As China continues to become economically and militarily dominant there is a tendency in Washington to act as though it all could have been prevented. But could China have been stopped? On this episode, China specialist and AEI fellow Zack Cooper walks us through how and why China failed to be incorporated into the international order as well as the futility of Trump’s tariff regime in changing Chinese behavior today.

Zack Cooper is a research fellow here at AEI, where he studies US defense strategy in Asia and US-China competition.

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Nations compete across many dimensions, but in the coming years perhaps no competition will be as fierce or as important as the one for talent. Harvard Business School Professor William Kerr explains why in his new book, “The Gift of Global Talent: How Migration Shapes Business, Economy, & Society,” which he joined my podcast to discuss.

William Kerr is Professor at Harvard Business School and Co-Director of the school’s Managing the Future of Work initiative. He’s also a recipient of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Prize Medal for Distinguished Research in Entrepreneurship. You can download the episode by clicking the link above, and don’t forget to subscribe to my podcast on iTunes or Stitcher. Tell your friends, leave a review.

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One response to stepped-up surveillance is stepped-up effort to hide from it — more laws regulating what people and governments are allowed to record, and more funds devoted to encryption and other privacy-protecting resources. But author and scientist David Brin says while this approach reflects the right instincts, it is insufficient. Especially as technology advances, there will be no hiding from surveillance. What we should instead fight for is transparency: the watchers must feel just as exposed as the watched.

Dr. Brin anticipated this debate with his 1998 book, “The Transparent Society,” which he joined me to discuss. We also talked about what privacy policy means when applied to the government versus the increasingly powerful tech titans, the future of AI, and lessons from science fiction. David Brin holds a PhD in astrophysics, and besides writing “The Transparent Society” is also the prize-winning author of several science fiction novels. His blog can be found here, and essays and speeches touched upon in this episode here, here, and here.

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It’s a perennial story. The demise of mom-and-pop stores, the shuttering of small businesses across the country, the undercutting of local sellers by massive corporations — in short, the retail apocalypse. But economist Michael Mandel has looked at the data and finds a much different story. Not only is the economy adding more jobs than it’s shedding thanks to the massive online retailers allegedly wreaking havoc across the United States, these new jobs actually pay more as well.

His work cuts against the conventional wisdom, and he joined the show to explain his case. We also discuss America’s productivity problem, whether the official stats are mismeasuring it, and how we think we’ll look back on the economy 25 years from now.

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