The Nation is reeling from sustained physical, verbal, and political attacks on our brave and patriotic law enforcement officers. These men and women put their lives on the line every single day to keep our communities safe. Instead of thanking them, a large portion of our society has subjected them to vulgar criticisms and vile characterizations. We have also seen extreme cases, such as in Portland, where violent anarchists, domestic terrorists, and thugs have wreaked violent attacks against law enforcement. Unfortunately, this has turned into a large movement to eliminate them altogether.

Commissioner Mark Morgan is the head of the largest law enforcement agency in the entire country. He has a long career in law enforcement, from police work, to the FBI, leading ICE, and now CBP. There is no one better situated to discuss how important law enforcement is and all the great work they are doing to restore law and order.

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Want to know why there are riots in our streets and the country appears to be completely divided? It didn’t happen organically, and it was not a grassroots effort. The foundations for our division were laid decades ago. Mike Gonzalez’s book, The Plot to Change America, explains. Join author Mike Gonzalez and conservative commentator Michael Knowles for an illuminating conversation about the roots of identity politics and how this pernicious way of thinking divides America, featuring introductory remarks by Kay C. James.


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As many schools across the country remain closed, parents are banding together to form “education pods,” pooling resources, grouping their children in co-quarantined clusters, and hiring a teacher or private tutor for instruction. It is a real-time, large scale example of civil society in action; what Edmund Burke called the “little platoons” that make America an exceptional nation. How do these education pods work for students, and how might they benefit teachers and families? How do you form an education pod of your own?

Join us for a discussion on how to build your own education pod with policy experts and parents who have created successful pods and microschools.

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General David H. Berger, Marine Corps Commandant, is aggressively pushing a dramatic redesign of the Corps for future war incorporating new missiles, advanced sensors, unmanned platforms, and hypervelocity weapons. His Force Design 2030 effort has drawn enthusiastic support from those who agree that the Corps must change to remain relevant on a more lethal battlefield. But it has generated an equally fervent amount of criticism from others who think the effort is overly focused on China—rendering the Corps irrelevant across a range of other potentially more likely scenarios. To achieve its vision, the Corps is doing away with tanks, reducing conventional artillery, shrinking units, and placing new demands on the Navy, already struggling to modernize its fleet. But it is adding anti-ship missiles, doubling-down on unmanned systems, and reenergizing a profound discussion about the importance of naval power.

Will a redesigned Corps make it irrelevant for land operations against conventional militaries of larger state powers or irregular forces like terrorist groups? Or are General Berger’s designs essential to America’s future ability to conduct nearly any military operation in any theater against a host of potential enemies?

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In the first half of 2020, the EPA has already taken numerous critical actions to help protect the environment while respecting the rule of law, federalism, and transparency. The agency has finalized efforts to both ensure that environmental regulations are based on sound and transparent science and environmental protections do more good than harm. Too often, however, opponents of these common sense reforms have used myths and scare tactics to distort the truth of the agency’s actions. These critics have even objected to the EPA using reasonable enforcement discretion during the pandemic. The reality is the EPA is taking a number of practical steps that are way past due. Join us as we hear directly from EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler to get the truth about the agency’s 2020 regulatory actions and what they mean to Americans.


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Following the death of George Floyd, books such as White Fragility rose on bestseller lists and “anti-racist” training programs saw a massive increase in demand in corporate America and governments at all levels, and concepts like “unconscious bias” and “internalized racial superiority” found their way into everyday conversation. What is the origin of Critical Race Theory that informs much of this training and what are its goals? And, will this new form of identity politics truly heal our nation? Join us for a discussion on the pervasive trends that, under the guise of equality, make diversity training in government, corporate America, and schools pernicious, divisive, and destructive.


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The Supreme Court’s blockbuster 2019-2020 term is winding down. There were important cases involving religious liberty, DACA, faithless electors, separation of powers, the scope of anti-discrimination laws, and the president’s tax returns. Our scholars and scribes will break down some of the landmark cases, talk about the historic new procedures utilized during the pandemic, and discuss what it all means.


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Every year it seems another new effort to “reform the Pentagon” is announced. Every Secretary of Defense for the last five Administrations has “made it a priority” to address perceived bloat and inefficiency. Yet, few of these initiatives produce significant results, and the Pentagon bureaucracy lumbers on, as wasteful as ever. In his book, Defense Management Reform, author Peter Levine addresses why, despite a long history of attempted reform, the Pentagon continues to struggle with waste and inefficiency. Join us for a fascinating conversation on what works—and what doesn’t—in the world of Pentagon reform.

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On May 21, 2020, President Trump announced that the United States would withdraw from the 1992 Treaty on Open Skies (OST) in response to allegations of many years of Russian violations. While Open Skies has arguably benefited the United States by providing a level of military transparency, the Trump Administration assessed that Russian abuse of the treaty has become too grave to continue its participation. Is withdrawing from Open Skies the correct decision? What does this mean for arms control negotiations moving forward? On July 14, hear from experts on both sides of the debate who will assess the withdrawal from the Open Skies Treaty and its implications.

 

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America is at a pivotal time in the history of our nation. Our country is torn apart by sharp disagreement on what it means to be an American. Many have forgotten that our nation is the best place of hope, opportunity, and freedom. Join us for the first of a three-part series, America’s History of Hope, as Dr. Lucas Morel and Dr. Thomas Krannawitter reflect on the triumphs of our American history, and ways to debunk the narratives of revisionist history.


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In an effort to contain COVID-19, many governors have used emergency powers to limit business activity, social gatherings, and mobility. Without action by state legislators these emergency powers will remain in place. Further economic damage and constitutional concerns can be allayed by replacing vague statutory language with clear parameters for emergency powers. Such powers should expire without affirmative legislative renewal, and targeted litigation may be required to ensure governors adhere to statutory limitations. Join us for a panel discussion on how legislators can navigate these legal waters.


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In the decades since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the United States has held sole global leadership. However, that leadership role is today contested by Russia and especially China. The crisis over the COVID-19 pandemic has illustrated the danger of the West’s dependence on Chinese exports and highlighted China’s pursuit of global technological and military dominance.

Yet, as a democracy, the United States stands a good chance of maintaining its global leadership role. In his new book, “The Return of Great Power Rivalry,” Matthew Kroenig argues that the human and social values embodied in the American system makes it far stronger and enduring than autocratic regimes. Join our all-star panel for a discussion of this important new work.

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The Heritage Foundation recently commissioned a nationally representative survey of parents across the country, along with a corresponding survey of school board members, to gauge their attitudes toward the state of civics education and the New York Times’ 1619 Project. The foundational essay of this project, recently awarded the Pulitzer Prize, seeks to “reframe the country’s history” by changing our founding date from 1776 to 1619, the year the first enslaved Africans arrived in America.

The Pulitzer Center estimates that 4,500 classrooms across the country have now adopted the 1619 Project and its associated curriculum, which states, “our democracy’s founding ideals were false when they were written.” Civics education has never been more important.

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As the world reels from the economic impacts of COVID-19, the U.S. and its allies can move beyond the current crisis together to foster increased economic freedom. The U.S.-European Economic Partnership Recovery Plan emphasizes transatlantic community cooperation on key issues such as free trade agreements, the Three Seas Initiative, energy security, and the future of 5G technology. As Americans and Europeans cooperate on these matters, Latvia is uniquely positioned to strengthen our understanding of how to successfully navigate these issues in Europe.

Please join us on June 30th for a special conversation with the Prime Minister of the Republic of Latvia, His Excellency Mr. Krišjānis Kariņš.

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Since the start of the pandemic, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has obfuscated important information about COVID-19. The Chinese government has silenced whistleblowers, forcibly disappeared citizen journalists, and misreported infection and death rates from COVID-19. Civil society and other critical responders, like Taiwan, have been sidelined. The CCP’s early decision to limit knowledge about the novel coronavirus significantly hampered other countries’ ability to respond to their own domestic outbreaks. The international community is now exploring various options for holding the CCP accountable. Join us for a conversation of how the U.S. and other countries can take effective, independent, and apolitical measures to hold the CCP accountable for mishandling COVID-19.


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Due to worker illnesses and even deaths related to COVID-19, there has been a bottleneck at meat processing plants that has reduced the supply of meat and poultry. Fortunately, these problems appear to be easing, but the situation remains fluid. As a result of these supply problems, there has been significant attention placed on the nature of the meat processing industry and the regulatory barriers imposed by federal meat inspection requirements that make it more difficult to sell meat. What is the current status of the meat supply, and what has been the practical impact of the bottleneck on farmers, processors, and consumers? What kind of meat-inspection reforms are being proposed? Would they make an impact on the meat supply and do they properly consider food safety and consumer interests? Join us as our experts discuss these timely issues.


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With the importance of savings magnified by the COVID-19 pandemic, a new idea is gaining popularity: Universal Savings Accounts (USAs).

These all-purpose savings accounts would allow every American to save for things other than just retirement, education, and health care. USAs could enable citizens to save for a rainy day, start a business, or grow their family. The National Coronavirus Recovery Commission also recently recommended USAs as a critical policy for reducing the financial risks of future pandemics by allowing more Americans to save for future unknowns. Hear from experts about how USAs not only protect savers from complicated and costly taxes but can help build local communities, support families, and shore up civil society.

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Capitalism offers greater prosperity and opportunity for everyone, while socialism, unnecessary interventionism, and other choices promise equal outcomes but inevitably fail. The findings of The Heritage Foundation’s annual Index of Economic Freedom reaffirm the truth of this statement year after year. A complete government takeover of healthcare, for example, would mean less competition among providers and a greater degree of statist intervention that would translate into lower quality healthcare treatment systems, less research, and fewer innovations. Fortunately, it is not too late to fix or avoid these problems. Join us for a discussion with author and internationally recognized economist Daniel Lacalle and Robert E. Moffit, Ph.D., Director of the Center for Health Policy Studies at the Heritage Foundation.


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Amid revenue shortfalls caused by COVID-19, governors and lawmakers are calling for federal bailouts for state and local governments.


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Since of the senseless death of George Floyd, the nation has started a serious conversation about police use-of-force policies and other potential reforms.


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