America has embarked on a long-overdue effort to modernize its nuclear deterrent, most of which is decades old and becoming obsolete. A critical part of this effort is the Air Force’s development of the Long Range Standoff weapon (LRSO), a new generation of the current nuclear-armed air-launched cruise missile (ALCM), which is quickly aging out.

 

Critical Race Theory (CRT) and public policies based on this worldview will not alleviate racial inequality in the real world. In fact, this dogma undermines human and social factors—such as family, entry-level work, and merit-based education—the wellspring of upward mobility. Yet, the rigid persistence with which believers apply this theory has made CRT a constant, daily presence in the lives of hundreds of millions of people.

CRT underpins Identity Politics, an ongoing effort to reimagine the United States as a nation riven by the division between racial groups, each with specific claims on victimization. In education and the workforce, as well as entertainment and social media, CRT has become entrenched, driving decision-making based on skin color rather than individual merit and talent. As Critical Theory becomes more familiar to the public in everyday life, CRT’s intolerance, and the idea of systemic racism is being “normalized” in the American psyche. This weakens public and private bonds that create trust between citizens and allow for civic engagement.

Join us for an exclusive conversation on the China challenge between Heritage’s James Carafano and Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Chad Wolf. At the conclusion of a year dominated by COVID and China Policy, Acting Secretary Wolf will discuss the policies that the Department of Homeland Security has put into place to address China, including travel, trade, and what is yet to come.


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Modern Anti-Semitism often manifests itself as hostility against Israel—particularly on college campuses, at the United Nations, and even in U.S. Congress. Despite claiming to lack hostility toward the global Jewish people, today’s “anti-Zionists” single out the world’s only Jewish state for specific and demonizing criticism. Casting Israel as a villain on the world stage, this rhetoric makes ample use of historic anti-Semitic tropes such as greed, global conspiracy, and media puppetmastery.

Elan Carr, the State Department’s Special Envoy to Monitor anti-Semitism, has successfully pursued recognition that this language is indeed anti-Semitism. By promoting the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s (IHRA) definition of anti-Semitism, which includes anti-Israel rhetoric, Carr has moved this definition solidly into public discourse.

To conclude this two-part series, we ask what the future of work and unions looks like in America. We will discuss both positive and negative ideas for long-term labor reform; from sectoral bargaining, which would mandate one-size-fits-wall wages and benefits across entire industries, to more positive recommendations that would instill flexibility and voluntarism in collective bargaining.

Prior to the coronavirus pandemic, the U.S. labor market was experiencing record-setting lows in unemployment and rising incomes, with the largest gains accruing to the lowest-income workers. This was the result of pro-worker and pro-growth tax and regulatory policies. A new congress and administration could not only undo some of those policies but could also pursue actions that could set American workers back decades. The Heritage Foundation and Institute for the American Worker would like to invite you to join us for a two-part series on the future of labor policy in America, for 2021 and beyond.

Join us as we celebrate one of the most significant protections of liberty in the history of the world: The Bill of Rights. Adopted 229 years ago, on December 15, 1791, the United States Constitution’s first ten amendments protect our most fundamental rights and liberties and guarantee equal protection under the law. In honor of the Bill of Rights, we will bolster five trailblazing initiatives that promote civic education and foster an appreciation of our founding for America’s next generation.


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Four decades ago, Bob Woodson founded an organization to identify, connect, and enhance the work of community leaders fighting problems like poverty, addiction, gang violence, and prisoner recidivism. He discovered common traits and principles at work in the extraordinary grassroots leaders he’s worked with over the years. Now he’s sharing these lessons for everyone looking for answers about what can restore wounded lives and communities.


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The United Nations Charter charges the organization with “promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and for fundamental freedoms for all.” Sadly, the U.N. has often failed to fulfill this obligation. In particular, the Human Rights Council has demonstrated bias and ineptitude, too often manipulated by the world’s worst human rights abusers. The U.S. left the Council in 2018 after other governments failed to support much-needed reforms to prevent human rights abusers from joining and eliminate discrimination against Israel. It is a tall task to fix a body that, in the words of Amb. Craft, “is a haven for despots and dictators, hostile to Israel, and ineffectual on true human rights crises.” Please join us as Amb. Craft discusses lessons learned and offers suggestions for reforms that would help the Council live up to its purpose.


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A new era of Great Power Competition is dawning between the U.S., China and Russia, and the struggle for dominance spans all the world’s oceans. The U.S. Navy is turning to meet this new threat, but the fleet has spent recent decades focused on near-coast operations and support for counterterrorism. Now, it must confront rival navies on the high seas and compensate for Chinese and Russian uses of non-military tactics such as hybrid warfare and coercive behavior.

>>> Index of U.S. Military Strength

Last winter, the regulatory system at the FDA, the CDC and CMS delayed the ability of the United States to rapidly develop and deploy COVID-19 testing. These regulatory failures contributed to the rapid spread of COVID and led to lockdowns, and a wave of infections. This time around, the agencies could (and should) enable us to get ahead of the virus by approving rapid self-testing kits for COVID-19.

The FDA has taken steps in this direction, but barriers remain. For example, a cheap rapid test requires a laboratory certificate, even though it can be performed anywhere with no lab equipment.

In part one of this two-part series, we will discuss what the election outcomes mean for labor policy in the near-term, including insights about what to expect from the next Congress, Administration, and State and Local governments.

Prior to the coronavirus pandemic, the U.S. labor market was experiencing record-setting lows in unemployment and rising incomes, with the largest gains accruing to the lowest-income workers. This was the result of pro-worker and pro-growth tax and regulatory policies. A new congress and administration could not only undo some of those policies but could also pursue actions that could set American workers back decades. The Heritage Foundation and Institute for the American Worker would like to invite you to join us for a two-part series on the future of labor policy in America, for 2021 and beyond.

In the past four years, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has achieved significant environmental benefits while reining in past agency overreach. It has finalized numerous regulations that respect the rule of law, federalism, and property rights. It has also been proactive in strengthening transparency in agency decision-making. This includes promoting policies that will help ensure the use of sound science and proper benefit-cost analysis in the formulation of regulations.

 

The Baltic Sea remains one of the most complex regions that the U.S. and NATO are obligated to defend, with Russia posing the only substantial threat to peace and stability. The impact of Russia’s growing presence in Belarus, the evolving global pandemic, the outcome of U.S. elections, and NATO’s ongoing period of reflection will cause ripples for Baltic Security. Finland, Sweden, and the U.S. share a focus on the security and stability of the Baltic Sea region. Already close partners, Sweden and Finland have sought ways to strengthen the security relationship with the U.S., including signing a Trilateral Agreement in May 2018.

Finland and Sweden have recently signaled significant increases in defense investment and continue to cooperate closely with NATO as “enhanced opportunity partners.” Join us for a discussion on Finland and Sweden’s ongoing role in Baltic Sea security, what the new defense investments are and what they mean, and why partnership with the U.S. and NATO should continue to be strengthened.

November is National Adoption Month and the morning after Election Day a critical case about foster care and religious freedom was heard by the Supreme Court. The pandemic shutdowns have reduced the supply of families for the 424,000 children in foster care, 125,000 of whom are eligible to be adopted. Even before COVID-19, the opioid crisis dramatically increased the number of children in the state’s care. And yet because of disagreements over same-sex marriage and gender identity, governments have been taking choices away from parents which reduces families for children. Adoption and foster care provide lifelines to children in need. Please join us as we discuss these issues that are fundamentally about life, civil rights, and the best interests of America’s neediest children.


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Imagine American life without private property rights and a free market system, the foundation that men and women, since the nation’s birth, developed and preserved. Plymouth’s first colonial settlement rejected communal property and successfully implemented the idea of individual property rights by promoting individual initiative and prosperity within the community. Today the assault on private property rights and the creep of socialism continue to challenge free-market principles. Join the discussion and trace the origins of free-market principles from Plymouth’s economic structures to today’s free-market economy and discover the influence on modern-day property rights and economic liberty.


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Faced with the possibility of deep rifts within their new community, the signers of the Mayflower Compact did something almost unheard of in Europe: They mutually agreed to enact “just and equal laws” to guide them in their new political community. There would be no king among their ranks; rather, they would submit themselves to laws that they themselves had written. In this, the Pilgrims offered an early model of American constitutionalism: the rule of law, equal justice, and government by consent of the governed. The Mayflower Compact stands as a rebuke to those who denigrate America’s historic commitment to freedom and democracy, ideals which were written into the very first pages of the American story. Join the discussion to hear the case for preserving our legacy of freedom.


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The 2020 Antipoverty Forum will highlight people and policies reconnecting communities to overcome poverty and social challenges.


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The key to achieving human flourishing is culture — not genes, geography, institutions, or policies. In his latest book, Why Culture Matters Most, Dr. David Rose argues that societal success depends on the ability to impart moral beliefs through culture, strengthening a society’s institutions and practices. Join our second Russell Kirk Lecture for a conversation with Dr. David Rose about the importance of culture and moral beliefs as the foundations for a flourishing civil society.


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Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic and in the face of a rising China, the U.S.-Taiwan partnership is more important than ever. Taiwan is an important partner in the Free and Open Indo-Pacific strategy and a strong democracy with shared values. For years, The Heritage Foundation has called for the U.S. forging an ever-closer partnership with Taiwan, from advocating for a free trade agreement to actively supporting Taiwan’s participation in international organizations. Join us as we discuss how to build upon the U.S.-Taiwan partnership and the role it plays.

 

Abortion, embryo-destructive research, assisted reproductive technologies, artificial wombs, genetically modified babies, physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia. These are just a small sampling of the bioethical questions our country will have to address in the coming years. Lying beneath these questions are competing visions of what it means to be a human being and how human beings flourish. Join an academic all-star panel as they discuss the ethics, policies, and philosophies at the core of today’s debates. All three scholars served in various capacities on The President’s Council on Bioethics, and have written extensively on these issues, including a new Harvard University Press book by Carter Snead, What It Means To Be Human: The Case for the Body in Public Bioethics.


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