What went wrong in Afghanistan, and who is to blame? Is America safer today than on September 10, 2001? What lessons should the leaders of America’s foreign policy draw from the war in Afghanistan? Ambassador Nathan Sales is a nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council, the former U.S. State Department Coordinator for Counterterrorism, and former acting Under Secretary of State for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights. He joins the show to answer these questions and others.

The James Madison Program: https://jmp.princeton.edu/events

Why is Jordan Peterson so popular? In what ways is Jordan Peterson’s approach to Scripture unique? What can Christians learn from Peterson about the Bible? Christopher Kaczor, Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University, joins Madison’s Notes to answer these questions and discuss his new book, “Jordan Peterson, God, and Christianity: The Search for a Meaningful Life.”

Jordan Peterson, God, and Christianity: The Search for a Meaningful Life: https://www.wordonfire.org/peterson-book/

What does the U.S. Special Presidential Envoy for Hostage Affairs do? How can a liberal arts education help you personally and professionally? Roger Carstens, U.S. Special Presidential Envoy for Hostage Affairs, joins Madison’s Notes to answer these questions and more.

What is academic freedom for? What are the greatest threats to academic freedom today? Should Critical Race Theory be taught on college campuses? What about in K-12 classrooms? Keith Whittington, Chairman of the Academic Freedom Alliance’s Academic Committee and the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Politics at Princeton University, joins the show to answer these questions and discuss the work of the Academic Freedom Alliance.

The Academic Freedom Alliance: https://academicfreedom.org/

Are Books VIII and IX the climax of the Republic? Is 21st century America a democratic or oligarchic society? Are democratic societies destined for tyranny? Marcus Gibson, Director of the Princeton Initiative in Catholic Thought, returns to Madison’s Notes to continue our series on the Platonic dialogues with a discussion of Books VIII and IX of the Republic.

Is the Declaration of Independence unique? Does the Declaration prescribe a form of government? What is the relationship between the Declaration and the Constitution? Allen C. Guelzo, Director of the James Madison Program’s Initiative on Politics and Statesmanship, joins the show to answer these questions and more.

Harry and Me: https://claremontreviewofbooks.com/harry-and-me/

Gigi Georges has had an extensive career in politics, public service, and academia. She joins Madison’s Notes to discuss her new book, “Downeast: Five Maine Girls and the Unseen Story of Rural America.” Georges discusses rootedness, the importance of home, life in rural America, the double-edged sword of “Progress,” and more.

Downeast: https://www.harpercollins.com/products/downeast-gigi-georges?variant=32306138284066

How did American Catholics go from subjects to citizens? Who is the “godfather” of the First Amendment? How can spiritual and temporal duties be reconciled? Michael Breidenbach, Associate Professor of History at Ave Maria University, joins the show to answer these questions and discuss his new book, “Our Dear-Bought Liberty: Catholics and Religious Toleration in Early America.”

Does God need politics? What does it mean to be free? Why should we care about tradition? Sohrab Ahmari, op-ed editor of the New York Post, joins Madison’s Notes to discuss his new book, “The Unbroken Thread: Discovering the Wisdom of Tradition in an Age of Chaos.” 

 

Why is education so important in a democracy? Are democracies capable of producing the citizens they need? What do John Locke and Alexis de Tocqueville have to teach us about education in a liberal democracy? Jeffrey Sikkenga, Executive Director of the Ashbrook Center, joins Madison’s Notes to answer these questions and more.

About the Ashbrook Center: https://ashbrook.org/about/

Helen Andrews, senior editor at The American Conservative, joins Madison’s Notes to discuss her new book, “Boomers: The Men and Women Who Promised Freedom and Delivered Disaster.”

Boomers: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/617494/boomers-by-helen-andrews/

Was Socrates guilty? What is the relationship between the philosopher and the city? What does it mean to live an “examined life”? Marcus Gibson, John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Princeton University’s James Madison Program, returns to the show to discuss The Apology of Socrates in this second episode of our series on the Platonic dialogues.

The Complete Works of Plato: https://www.hackettpublishing.com/philosophy/complete-works

For 40 months, Wang Xiyue was imprisoned in Iran on false charges of espionage. A doctoral candidate in history at Princeton University, Wang Xiyue joins the show to discuss his imprisonment and U.S.-Iranian relations.

Don’t let Iran’s human rights be sacrificed at the altar of a nuclear deal: https://www.aei.org/articles/dont-let-irans-human-rights-be-sacrificed-at-the-altar-of-a-nuclear-deal/

Born in Somalia, Ayaan Hirsi Ali is a women’s rights activist, free speech advocate, and New York Times bestselling author. She joins the show to discuss her new book, “Prey: Immigration, Islam, and the Erosion of Women’s Rights.” [Note: This conversation includes discussion of sensitive topics related to sexual violence.]

Prey: https://www.harpercollins.com/products/prey-ayaan-hirsi-ali?variant=32126595203106

What is postmodernism? Does the Biden Administration support Critical Race Theory? How might a recommitment to classical liberal principles help fight “Woke-ism”? James Lindsay joins the show to answer these questions and more and discuss his book (co-written with Helen Pluckrose), “Cynical Theories: How Activist Scholarship Made Everything About Race, Gender, and Identity—and Why This Harms Everybody.”

Cynical Theories: https://cynicaltheories.com/

Why and how should we read Plato? Why did Plato write dialogues? Is Plato a friend to democracy? Dr. Marcus Gibson, John and Daria Barry Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Princeton University’s James Madison Program, joins Madison’s Notes to provide an introduction to Plato in preparation of a series of episodes on individual Platonic dialogues.

 

John Cribb is the author of “Old Abe,” a historical novel which former Vice President Mike Pence says is the “best book on President Lincoln” he has ever read. John joins to show to discuss the book, the importance of heroes, the “great man” approach to history, Facebook’s attempts to “cancel” his book, and more!

 

What does the future hold for the Republican Party? What are the greatest challenges facing America today? How many pull-ups should a young man be able to do? Congressman Mike Gallagher joins Madison’s Notes to answer these questions and more.

On January 6th, 2021, the world watched in disbelief as rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol  as the results of the Electoral College were being formally presented—and challenged—in Congress. The riots left at least 4 dead, and many others wounded. Robert P. George, Director of the James Madison Program, and Allen C. Guelzo, Director of the James Madison Program’s Initiative on Politics and Statesmanship, discuss the significance of this attack on the Capitol, the state of the Nation, and what Republicans and Democrats alike can do to fix this.

What is the relationship between America’s Founding principles and her foreign policy? What are unalienable rights and how do we know they exist? How have other nations responded to the final report of the U.S. Department of State’s Commission on Unalienable Rights? Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo and Mary Ann Glendon, Chair of the Commission on Unalienable Rights, join Madison’s Notes to answer these questions and others.