Richard Epstein reacts to the proposed tax increases in President Biden’s spending bill and explains what “tax the rich” really means.

Richard Epstein delves into President Biden’s new vaccine mandate and addresses whether it holds up to constitutional scrutiny.

Richard Epstein reacts to the new Texas abortion bill and weighs in whether states should be allowed to delegate enforcement of controversial laws to civilians.

Richard Epstein explains when the use of force is justified overseas, what President Biden has gotten wrong by withdrawing from Afghanistan, and how our allies and adversaries will react to the fall of Pax Americana.

Richard Epstein dives into the latest IPCC report on climate change and provides a few methods for how to interpret, critique, and verify its results.

Is that legal? Richard answers questions about the constitutionality of student loan forgiveness, the national eviction moratorium, and California’s upcoming recall election.

Richard Epstein recounts President Reagan’s handling of the air traffic controller strike of 1981 and offers lessons for future conflicts with other public sector unions.

Richard Epstein details the upcoming Supreme Court case that could overturn Roe v. Wade and gives his predictions based on the current composition of the Court.

Richard Epstein delves into Trump’s claim that censorship by tech companies violated his First Amendment rights and explains why there’s more to the lawsuit than at first glance.

Richard Epstein weighs in on recent moves by the SEC to change financial disclosure requirements regarding climate change and warns against mission creep in regulatory agencies.

Richard Epstein addresses the privacy concerns of publishing leaked tax records, breaks down the debate over taxing capital gains, and provides a solution for how to tax the wealthy.

Richard Epstein discusses the rise and fall of the ACLU, including its heroic efforts during desegregation and the Civil Rights movement, and its less than heroic metamorphosis into a partisan organization overrun by identity politics.

Richard Epstein explains why corporate tax rates in other countries affect companies here in the United States, weighs in on the President Biden’s proposed tax increases, and gives advice for the lonely few who still want to limit government spending.

Richard Epstein traces the history of the Supreme Court on abortion, from the day before Roe v. Wade to today, when a new case out of Mississippi raises the prospect that the landmark ruling may be overturned. Also, stay tuned to the end of the podcast for a special announcement.

Richard Epstein analyzes the recent outbreak of violence between the Israelis and the Palestinians, the future of American foreign policy in the Middle East, and the viability of Palestinian claims based on the “right of return.”

Richard Epstein examines the economic issues coming to the fore with the end of the COVID pandemic: a sluggish labor market, inflation fears, tax increases, and the future of American infrastructure.

Richard Epstein dissects the recent proposal to remove patent protection for COVID vaccines as a way to make them more affordable for the developing world — and explains why the patent system is one of the most underappreciated sources of American dynamism.

Richard Epstein analyzes a raft of progressive tax proposals: big increases to capital gains and corporate tax rates, plus the continuing quest to repeal the cap on state and local tax deductions. Then a look at the other side of the ledger: what consequences should we expect from the Biden Administration’s torrent of new spending proposals?

Richard Epstein analyzes the Equality Act, a progressive proposal that would expand the definition of sex discrimination and set the stage for a legal battle between trans activists and advocates for religious liberty.

Richard Epstein analyzes why a recent effort to unionize an Amazon facility in Alabama went down to a lopsided defeat, parses congressional Democrats’ new labor legislation, and explains why the zero-sum mindset behind private-sector union efforts are likely to fail.