Richard Epstein describes why immigration policy is fraught with complicated trade-offs that make hard-line positions — whether on the restrictionist side or the open-borders side — inappropriate. Along the way, he ventures into the debates over which criteria America should use to admit new immigrants, the effect of low-wage immigrants on American labor, whether it’s inconsistent to support free trade without supporting open borders, and why America has been so successful at assimilating immigrants from different races and cultures.

Richard Epstein analyzes the debate around Texas’ cold-weather blackouts. How much of the blame does climate change bear? Is the problem an excessive reliance on renewable energies or a failure to harden infrastructure against extreme weather events? And what do the Biden Administration’s policies mean for the future of grid resiliency?

Richard Epstein describes his work on a case pitting Chicago conservationists against Barack Obama on plans for the former commander-in-chief’s presidential center.

Richard Epstein explains the history and sweep of American antitrust law, examines a proposal by Senator Amy Klobuchar to expand it, and argues that a more complex economy may actually justify less exacting antitrust policies.

Richard Epstein parses the wave of energy and environmental policies introduced in the early days of the Biden Administration, from the cancellation of the Keystone Pipeline to rejoining the Paris Climate Agreement to an emphasis on renewable energy and the potential of green jobs.

Richard Epstein analyzes a raft of progressive policies coming out of the new Biden Administration on everything from energy to COVID to immigration to gun control.

Richard Epstein provides in-depth legal analysis of the 25th Amendment, the impeachment count against President Trump, the ability of Congress to bar a president from future office, and the legality of impeaching a president after he’s departed office.

Richard Epstein analyzes the dramatic events of the last week through a legal prism: Did Congress really have the power to object to the electoral vote? Should President Trump be removed from office in light of the assault on the capitol? Does the prospect of President Trump pardoning himself call into question the breadth of the pardon power? Plus, a look back at the consequences of the 2016 Presidential election in which Professor Epstein finds himself in the rare position of finding a question too difficult to answer.

Richard Epstein casts a critical eye on Nasdaq’s proposal to impose diversity requirements on the companies listed on its exchange.

Richard Epstein analyzes the major legal plot lines attending the presidential transition: The Trump campaign’s frantic efforts to keep the president’s prospects alive in court, the possibility of a raft of last-minute presidential pardons, and the decision by Attorney General William Barr to transform U.S. Attorney John Durham — currently investigating the origins of the Russia probe — into a special counsel.

Richard Epstein looks at the policy proposals that will be at the forefront of the Biden Administration, from climate change to immigration to forgiving student loans.

Richard Epstein looks at the Supreme Court’s pre-election decisions on state voting procedures, considers the likelihood that the ultimate outcome of the race will come down to a Supreme Court decision, and responds to the argument that Amy Coney Barrett should recuse herself from any such cases.

Richard Epstein examines the merits of the antitrust case against Google, as well as calls to regulate how social media companies regulate content; looks back to the Microsoft antitrust case to explain what lessons it may hold for the current lawsuit; and makes his predictions for the trajectory of tech regulation under Biden or Trump administrations.

Richard Epstein scrutinizes the Senate’s confirmation process for Amy Coney Barrett, considers how much deference legislators should give to presidents of the opposite party for their judicial picks, and describes which areas of law he thinks a more conservative court should focus on reforming.

Richard Epstein previews some of the most contentious cases on the docket in the new Supreme Court term. Will a change to the individual mandate spell the end of the Affordable Care Act? Can religious organizations be excluded from placing foster children if they refuse to work with same-sex couples? And what role will the Court play in the tumultuous 2020 election?

In their new book, Law and Leviathan: Redeeming the Administrative State, Harvard Law professors Cass Sunstein and Adrian Vermeule mount a defense of the federal government’s maze of policymaking agencies and departments — institutions that many critics say operate outside of the nation’s constitutional architecture and any meaningful democratic controls.

Earlier this year, Professor Epstein released his own book, The Dubious Morality of Modern Administrative Law, making precisely the opposite case. Tune in as Professor Epstein explains the differences between the two sides and explains what an effective, constitutionally-constrained administrative state would look like.

Richard Epstein explains the economic problems inherent to organized labor, describes how public policy has locked them into place, and cautions against the strand of conservative populism that aims to develop an alternative union model for the 21st century.

Richard Epstein examines the case for whether “institutional racism” really exists in America, describes how authorities should react when protests devolve into violence, and reflects on whether Americans can reverse the last few years’ decline in race relations.

Richard Epstein analyzes a trio of policy mistakes in California: the renewable energy mandates that have led to rolling blackouts, the restrictions on contractors that have Uber and Lyft looking for the exits, and a proposed wealth tax that would hit citizens even if they move out of state.

Richard Epstein analyzes the legality of President Trump’s recent executive orders on COVID relief and explains how executive orders fit into the constitutional order.