Summary

Images of thousands of illegal aliens, mostly from Haiti, camped under the international bridge in Del Rio, Texas, last September created a serious political problem for the Biden administration, which feared it would harm Democratic prospects in the 2022 midterm elections.

Despite the administration’s hostility to border enforcement, the need to make the problem go away caused the White House to decide to deport some of the illegal aliens back to Haiti. To secure Haiti’s approval, it made a deal with Dr. Ariel Henry, Haiti’s acting prime minister and acting president: Haiti would accept the deportees in exchange for the Biden administration allowing the acting president to cancel the upcoming elections and remain in power.

Summary

On this week’s episode of Parsing Immigration Policy, Todd Rokita, the 44th Attorney General of the state of Indiana, discusses legal actions his state has taken to combat illegal immigration. Attorney General Rokita has taken on a leadership role in challenging the Biden administration’s lack of immigration enforcement.

AG Rokita says, “The foundational part of our ‘American Exceptionalism’ is the rule of law and we’re nothing if we’re not going to follow the law… and we’re not all under it.” Due to a lack of enforcement of immigration laws, there are over 124,000 illegal immigrants in the state of Indiana, putting a strain on Indiana’s social services and driving up crime and fentanyl overdose numbers in the state.

Summary

On this week’s episode of Parsing Immigration Policy, host Mark Krikorian is joined by Akiva Lamm, the government and communications director for the Israeli Immigration Policy Center, based in Jerusalem. Krikorian and Lamm explore the striking similarities between the immigration-control challenges faced by their respective countries.

The IIPC was established in 2012 in response to the illegal infiltration of “asylum-seekers” from Sudan and Eritrea across Israel’s desert border with Egypt – a problem very similar to the one faced by the U.S. on its own southern border. It was solved by the construction of a barrier along Israel’s entire 150-mile border with Egypt, though Lamm stresses the need in addition for a legal “wall”, to deter possible infiltrators and visa-overstayers from breaking the law in the first place.

Summary

Federal authorities estimate that more than one million people in the United States, many of them illegal aliens, are using Social Security numbers belonging to someone else. However, government agencies choose to look the other way, allowing Americans, including young children, to be victimized by identity thieves.

This week, Ben Weingarten joins Parsing Immigration Policy to talk about a report on ID theft he co-authored for RealClearInvestigations.com, where he is deputy editor. Weingarten discusses with Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies and host of the podcast, various steps the federal government can take to address this widespread fraud.

Summary

A record number of illegal aliens have been caught at the U.S. Southwest border this year, and more than 1 million have been released into the United States. Despite these historic numbers, the arrest, detention, and removal of illegal aliens inside the country is down as a result of the Biden administration’s disregard for the enforcement of immigration laws. Robust border security and interior enforcement work together to provide a deterrent to illegal immigration but both are being undermined by the White House, and increased illegal immigration is the natural result.

Tom Homan, former director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, joins Parsing Immigration Policy this week to discuss the Biden administration’s lack of transparency on the dangerous public safety impact of its policies, and the insufficient response from Congress.

Summary

Illegal border crossings reached yet another all-time high in apprehensions of illegal border crossers in July, with the year-to-date total of 1.8 million apprehensions exceeding the number encountered in all of FY2021. More importantly, the number of illegal crossers who are released into the country, together with the “gotaways” who avoided arrest, is at an all-time high. Since the Biden administration shows no sign of changing policies to reduce illegal entries, some states have moved to buffer their citizens from the consequences of this influx. Florida has been the most innovated and assertive in marshaling state authorities to address these consequences, including empaneling a statewide grand jury with expansive investigative powers to attack the criminal infrastructure that drives illegal immigration and to hold accountable those who participate in illegal migration-related criminal schemes.

Dan Cadman, a senior fellow at the Center and a former senior ICE official, explains the role and powers of this grand jury and the possible impact it may have. One focus for the jury will be the smuggling of unaccompanied minors into the country and the implications for parents who pay smugglers to transport their children from their home countries. The grand jury may also look at whether certain local governments, reportedly including Miami-Dade County, are following Florida law, which requires them to assist ICE in taking custody of criminal aliens.

Summary

More than a million migrants have been apprehended and released into the United States under the Biden administration. If got-aways – migrants who successfully evaded Border Patrol – and unaccompanied minors are added, the total is nearly two million. In today’s episode of Parsing Immigration Policy, experts discuss solutions to ending the border crisis and executing an effective interior enforcement plan.

Dan Vara, a former District/Chief Legal Counsel for the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Miami Division and a Center board member, shares his experiences with past operations that successfully dealt with mass migration situations, including the record breaking mass exodus of Nicaraguans from their home country to the United States in 1988 and 1989.

Summary

Does the large scale admission of foreign students from the People’s Republic of China (PRC) PRC, especially those in STEM fields, pose an economic or security threat to the United States? More than 317,000 Chinese students are present in the country today, representing over one-third of all foreign students. The PRC government considers every one of these students an intelligence asset, and pressures them all to gather whatever intelligence they can during their time in this country.

George Fishman, the Center for Immigration Studies’ senior legal fellow, has been following this issue since 2005, and joins this week’s episode of Parsing Immigration Policy to discuss his recent report on the escalation of students from the PRC studying in the United States, the intelligence collection threat they present, and several steps the United States – and even states – can take to limit the espionage taking place at universities.

View Podcast Archive


Summary

Federal law places limits on immigration. What for? After all, there are those who advocate the free flow of people across borders, allowing unlimited immigration into the United States. This week’s episode of Parsing Immigration Policy addresses the reasons for immigration laws.

View Podcast Archive


Summary

The costs and benefits of immigration are routinely measured and debated in academic journals with the conclusion that immigration has mixed effects. That conclusion comports with most people’s common-sense understanding of the issue. Nevertheless, many advocacy groups continue to cite a supposed academic “consensus” that immigration has only benefits. In this week’s episode of Parsing Immigration Policy, Jason Richwine, the Center’s resident scholar, discusses his recently updated compendium of academic work showing negative impacts of immigration.

View Podcast Archive


Summary

The U.S. Supreme Court’s 2021-2022 term is over, and its final ruling was on the “Remain in Mexico” case brought against the administration by the states of Texas and Missouri. But that is only one of a large number of immigration cases filed over the past year and a half since President Biden’s inauguration. The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a conversation on immigration-related lawsuits brought against the Biden administration, at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, July 6. The discussion focused on specific cases being litigated as well as on how litigation has affected decision-making in the executive and how it might influence Congress’s framing of legislation.

View Podcast Archive


Summary

The Supreme Court finished its 2021-2022 term with the release of Biden v. Texas, a case brought against the administration by the states of Texas and Missouri. Most of the media attention has focused on the Court’s finding that the Biden administration may rescind the Trump-era Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP) – often referred to as the “Remain in Mexico” – policy. But receiving little attention is that the key issues in the matter were remanded to the lower courts. These are the issues that will have lasting impact on immigration policy and how it is enforced.

View Podcast Archive


Summary

Some two million people have illegally crossed over the Southwest border and settled in the United States since President Biden’s inauguration. Americans see the images and are justifiably concerned.

View Podcast Archive


Summary

A panel discussion was held and sponsored jointly by the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) and the Hungarian Migration Research Institute (MRI), which examined the challenges posed by the Ukrainian refugee crisis. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine unleashed a deluge of refugees on Europe comparable in size only to the massive displacement of people at the end of World War II. Front-line countries in Europe – Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Moldova, and Romania – opened their borders to those fleeing Ukraine, and the EU in an historic decision offered them temporary protection, including the right to work. The United States has focused on helping Ukrainians where they are in Europe, pledging up to $5 billion in humanitarian assistance. In addition, however, the Biden administration has pledged to take in 100,000 Ukrainians, granted Temporary Protected Status to those already in the U.S., and created the “Unity for Ukraine” program to allow individuals to sponsor Ukrainians who don’t want to stay in the EU.

View Podcast Archive


Summary

Within the next three weeks, the Supreme Court of the United States will issue an opinion in Biden v. Texas, which involves the administration’s termination of the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), better known as “Remain in Mexico”. The Court will decide if there are limits on the administration’s authority to ignore explicit congressional mandates in allowing foreign nationals to enter and remain in the United States. Understanding the issues surrounding detention and the history behind the detention mandates in the INA will be key to understanding the Court’s holding in what some consider the most important immigration legal case ever heard.

View Podcast Archive


Summary

Allegations in a recent whistleblower lawsuit raise serious questions about the extent of fraud in the foreign student program and the ability of the federal government to provide proper oversight.

View Podcast Archive


Summary

On this week’s episode of Parsing Immigration Policy, Jeremy Carl, a senior fellow at the Claremont Institute, discusses America’s history and values as they pertain to immigration. Carl stresses the importance of understanding what it means to be a nation and asks the question: Is America a nation of immigrants or a nation with immigrants?

View Podcast Archive


Summary

On this week’s episode of Parsing Immigration Policy, Kevin Lynn, Executive Director of Progressives for Immigration Reform (PFIR), joins us to discuss the displacement of Americans in high-skilled jobs, specifically in the field of medicine. Doctors are required to complete a post-graduate residency program in order to be licensed to practice medicine in the United States. But these taxpayer-funded programs are passing over American physicians who have been educated at U.S. medical schools in favor of foreign doctors who have trained abroad.

View Podcast Archive


Summary

In this week’s episode of Parsing Immigration Policy, guest Phillip Linderman discusses the history of the Cuban migrant program and provides policy recommendations. Linderman, a retired State Department Foreign Service Officer, served in Trinidad, Chile, Cuba, and post-communist East Germany before returning to Washington, D.C. to work at the Organization of American States. During his time abroad, Linderman worked in the consular sector of the State Department, which was primarily charged with helping American citizens abroad and issuing visas and passports.

View Podcast Archive


Summary

Today on Parsing Immigration Policy, the Center responds to the argument by many supporters of high levels of immigration that an expansion of immigration would reduce inflation, which is close to a 40-year high. They argue that admitting more foreign workers to fill jobs would decrease wages and lower consumer prices. The Center’s analysis shows that the foreign workers would be filling jobs typically performed by the less-educated, such as food service, healthcare support, hospitality, and trucking. Reducing wages for the less-educated is not an effective means of controlling inflation because such workers earn relatively little and as a result account for only a modest share of economic output. Dr. Steven Camarota, the Center’s director of research, voices concern for the impact such a plan would have on the economic prospects of working-class Americans who have seen little to no wage growth for decades. Lowering wages for the lowest-paid workers will also impact taxpayers if these workers would then qualify for some of the country’s welfare programs. In his closing commentary, Mark Krikorian, the Center’s executive director and host of Parsing Immigration Policy, discusses Secretary Mayorkas’s appearance before the Senate Homeland Security Governmental Affairs Committee. While it lacked the drama of the House committee hearings, it revealed that the Biden administration is no longer trying to deter illegal migrants, making it the first administration to have such a policy.