With polls showing alarming pluralities of voters not believing in the legitimacy of the last national election, how can we set the record straight on what transpired in 2020? Hoover Institution visiting fellow Ben Ginsberg, a preeminent authority on election law, interviews Center for Election Innovation & Research executive David Becker and CBS News chief Washington correspondent Major Garrett, coauthors of the newly released book The Big Truth: Upholding Democracy in the Age of “The Big Lie,” on fact versus fiction in America’s democratic process.

Big-money initiative wars over wealth taxes and online gaming dominate California’s airwaves; the Golden State’s plan for electric vehicles travels down an uncertain road; and a downturn in state revenue could mean trouble ahead. Hoover senior fellow Lee Ohanian and distinguished policy fellow Bill Whalen, both contributors to Hoover’s California on Your Mind web channel, join Hoover senior writer Jonathan Movroydis to discuss the latest in the Golden State, including a spend-happy governor Gavin Newsom suddenly embracing fiscal conservatism through his veto messages.

How do elections officials prepare for midterm and presidential votes, and what improvements can be made to states’ voting systems? Hoover Institution visiting fellow Ben Ginsberg, a preeminent authority on election law, interviews Milwaukee Election Commission executive director Claire Woodall-Vogg and Colorado County Clerks Association executive director Matt Crane on the highs (quick and accurate vote counts) and lows (personal threats, election deniers) that come from administering elections in America’s battleground states.

In battleground states across the nation, disinformation and partisan accusations have fed a growing lack of public confidence in America’s democratic process. Hoover Institution visiting fellow Ben Ginsberg, a preeminent authority on election law, interviews NYU Law professor Bob Bauer and Maricopa County supervisor Bill Gates on the root causes for the electorate’s trust going off the rails and suggested reforms to reassure those doubters that future elections are conducted honestly, with their votes counted accurately.

How to reinvest in and reinvigorate Newark, New Jersey, a city stricken by chronic poverty, unemployment and lack of investment capital? Hoover veteran fellow “Iron Mike” Steadman, a former Marine infantry officer, three-time college boxing champ, and CEO of the nonprofit IRONBOUND Boxing & Education, discusses his plans to get kids into the “squared circle” and young adults on an entrepreneurial path.

An irony in states across America: candidates seeking to become chief election officers who campaign and rail against the integrity of the democratic process. Hoover Institution visiting fellow Ben Ginsberg, a preeminent authority on election law, interviews former Kentucky secretary of state Trey Grayson and Politico reporter Zach Montellaro on the policy consequences should election deniers gain office, on current deficiencies within America’s voting systems, plus what state election officers can do ease the concerns of skeptics of our current democratic process.

Over the next few days, London will be filled to the brim with mourners paying their respects to the late Queen Elizabeth II; billions around the world will watch her state funeral. Historian and Hoover visiting fellow Andrew Roberts discusses the end of an era in Great Britain, how Charles III should proceed in her absence, and how historians might choose to examine the queen if given access to her diaries and personal papers.

On the eve of the 9/11 anniversary, another event that went largely unnoticed outside the military community: Aug. 30 and the one-year anniversary of the chaotic U.S. evacuation from Kabul. Joseph Felter, a Hoover Institution research fellow and former Army Special Forces officer once deployed to Afghanistan, discusses lessons learned from that day, current intelligence capabilities in Afghanistan, the future of U.S. relations with Pakistan and India, plus how the war on terror is presented to a new generation of officers at West Point.

Why is the right to vote important to a democracy? What legal protections should there be? How do we counter electoral refuseniks who won’t accept outcomes? Hoover Institution visiting fellow Ben Ginsberg, a preeminent authority on election law, interviews Stanford University political scientist Bruce Cain and Stanford Law School professor Nathaniel Persily on the struggle to restore the public’s confidence in the accuracy of elections.

As an FBI affidavit reveals details of what classified documents the FBI found in Donald Trump’s Palm Beach residence, the question is: will the Justice Department take the unprecedented step of prosecuting a former president? John Yoo, a Hoover Institution visiting fellow and UC-Berkeley law professor, weighs the legal options before Attorney General Merrick Garland, as well as how to restore the FBI’s tarnished image, plus the constitutionality of forgiving student-loan debt.

What can be done to avoid a repeat of 2020 and a re-questioning of the legitimacy and validity of American elections? Attorney Ben Ginsburg, a Hoover Institution visiting fellow and preeminent authority on election law, introduces Saints, Sinners and Salvageables – Restoring America’s Faith In Voting, a multi-part podcast in which the nation’s leading election officials discuss federal and state voting reforms and new ways to bring further transparency to the democratic process.

An online retail giant chooses not to expand in California, and Newsom’s change of heart regarding safe injection sites generates further presidential buzz. Hoover senior fellow Lee Ohanian and distinguished policy fellow Bill Whalen, both contributors to Hoover’s “California on Your Mind” web channel, join Hoover senior writer Jonathan Movroydis to discuss the latest in the Golden State, including farmworkers’ voting rights, fast-food oversight, and the irony of a renewable-loving California relying on one nuclear plant for its electricity needs.

Are Chinese and American forces on a collision course in the South China Sea? Admiral Roughead, the Hoover Institution’s Robert and Marion Oster Distinguished Military Fellow and the U.S. Navy’s 29th chief of naval operations, discusses China’s PLA Naval expansion, U.S. strategic concerns in the Western Pacific, plus the U.S. Navy’s construction, maintenance, and personnel needs.

Congress allocates $370 billion to address climate change while philanthropists offer billions more under the guise of environmental stewardship. Bjorn Lomborg, a Hoover Institution visiting fellow and environmental researcher, discusses ways to develop cheaper energy sources, along with a broader strategy addressing the quality-of-life needs of developed and developing lands.

As a result of California’s “wildfire season” now a year-long occurrence there is widespread difficulty in finding insurance, unsustainable pressure on the state’s insurance market, and a need to better anticipate and contain fire damage. Donnie Hasseltine and David Winnacker, members of Hoover’s inaugural class of veteran fellows, discuss their three-part plan to balance California’s competing housing and fire insurance demands.

Are we in a recession, what are the roots of the present inflationary spiral, what’s valid criticism of Federal Reserve policy and federal spending choices? John Cochrane, the Hoover Institution’s Rose-Marie and Jack Anderson senior fellow and proprietor of the Grumpy Economist blog, walks us these and other economic questions.

Will a California state law that’s survived a legal challenge now force the state’s independent truckers to unionize? Hoover senior fellow Lee Ohanian and distinguished policy fellow Bill Whalen, both contributors to Hoover’s “California on Your Mind” web channel, join Hoover senior writer Jonathan Movroydis to discuss a possible supply chain crisis should truckers disobey the requirement, the feasibility of a new north-south water tunnel, a proposed bill that would allow some California cities to serve alcohol until 4 a.m., plus the peculiarity of governor Gavin Newsom raising his national profile while Golden State Democrats don’t seem much interested in a larger role in 2024’s presidential primaries.

California governor Gavin Newsom vacations in Montana despite his public feuds with other such red states and a California law banning official travel by state employees. Hoover senior fellow Lee Ohanian and distinguished policy fellow Bill Whalen, both contributors to Hoover’s “California on Your Mind” web channel, join Hoover senior writer Jonathan Movroydis to discuss Newsom’s presidential prospects, the deflated state of San Francisco office space, plus UCLA and USC making a financial killing by relocating to the Big Ten Conference.

The Supreme Court’s recent rulings on abortion, guns, and other contentious social issues further complicates an already opaque political landscape. David Brady and Douglas Rivers, Hoover Institution senior fellows and Stanford University political scientists, discuss what if any opinion shifts their polling data suggests and what other political variables (inflation, an unpopular president) might affect November’s outcome.

The Supreme Court offers landmark decisions concerning abortion, Second Amendment rights, and public prayer at school activities. John Yoo, a Hoover Institution visiting fellow and UC-Berkeley law professor, discusses whether this year’s caseload marks the beginning of a historic conservative run on the high court, plus the internal dynamics of six right-leaning justices who sometimes differ on contentious jurisprudence.