Is America going to pot? Probably. In response to recreational marijuana recently being made legal in Canada and Michigan, and record numbers of Americans supporting legalization, the Young Americans debate whether we should celebrate these trends or be more skeptical of them. Call it a “pot-cast.”

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There are 5 comments.

  1. Penfold Member

    So, as a Libertarian, Kayla is against all enforcement of laws restricting recreational drug use. However she’s for legalizing pot so it will be safer because we’d be able to control it. Does anyone else see a problem here?

    • #1
    • November 30, 2018, at 12:25 PM PST
    • 1 like
  2. Full Size Tabby Member

    Penfold (View Comment):

    So, as a Libertarian, Kayla is against all enforcement of laws restricting recreational drug use. However she’s for legalizing pot so it will be safer because we’d be able to control it. Does anyone else see a problem here?

    Colorado early on discovered that much of the trade remained underground because of the costs of regulations and taxation.

    • #2
    • December 1, 2018, at 5:38 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  3. Full Size Tabby Member

    Kayla simply rejects any information that doesn’t support her position. I think she overestimates the amount of policing that is devoted to drugs, and as the other panelist noted, she conflates drug policy and general criminal justice reform.

    She seems willing to impose onto families the potentially large societal costs of her experiment.

    • #3
    • December 1, 2018, at 5:53 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  4. Jeff Hawkins Coolidge

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):

    Kayla simply rejects any information that doesn’t support her position. I think she overestimates the amount of policing that is devoted to drugs, and as the other panelist noted, she conflates drug policy and general criminal justice reform.

    She seems willing to impose onto families the potentially large societal costs of her experiment.

    This, as soon as she put out the tired trope that people are put in prison for years for simple possession I sort of had to take things with a grain of salt.

    You can’t argue vis-a-vis alcohol, the genie’s out of the bottle. Reducing crime isn’t a question of making fewer things illegal. The question is: does legislating do good? I used to be far more libertarian on the deal until I realized we hadn’t thought out the effects. We legalize but then the big government types also want us to pay for rehab etc.

    • #4
    • December 3, 2018, at 8:48 AM PST
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  5. Archibald Campbell Member

    Kayla’s argument was fairly fact-free. That’s not to say that I disagree with all of it, but it was more an argument you’d have at a bar with someone than a real fact- and law-driven policy debate. And as @jeffhawkins points out, my understanding is that many of those sentences look like minor offenses, but that’s only because they’ve been plead down from more serious ones. It also seems like pretty solid speculation that more people will consume pot if it becomes both legal at both the state and federal levels and less dangerous and more convenient to get at “regular” stores (or online.) It may not be a huge spike, but it’s hard to see how usage doesn’t climb in a statistically significant way.

    • #5
    • December 4, 2018, at 10:36 AM PST
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