Dr. Brian Keating, PhD, is a professor of physics at the Center for Astrophysics & Space Sciences (CASS) in the Department of Physics at the University of California, San Diego. He is a public speaker, inventor, and an expert in the study of the universe’s oldest light, the cosmic microwave background (CMB), using it to learn about the origin and evolution of the universe. He has written for many publications including Scientific American and is about to be the first speaker from the hard sciences at Prager U. Brian bravely counters much of scientific academia where he believes the overwhelming majority of scientists are atheists and “hardcore leftists” and their beliefs actually impact the politics of science. How does this affect scientific findings and those who are awarded?

His latest book, Losing the Nobel Prize: A Story of Cosmology, Ambition, and the Perils of Science’s Highest Honor where Brian “provocatively argues that the Nobel Prize, instead of advancing scientific progress, may actually hamper it, encouraging speed and greed while punishing collaboration and bold innovation. In a thoughtful reappraisal of the wishes of Alfred Nobel, Keating offers practical solutions for reforming the prize, providing a vision of a scientific future in which cosmologists may, finally, be able to see all the way back to the very beginning.”

Follow Brian Keating on Twitter @DrBrianKeating  and his excellent website BrianKeating.com.

Out Music: She Blinded Me With Science (acoustic), Thomas Dolby.

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There are 4 comments.

  1. Thatcher

    Dave, this was a terrific interview. I’d encourage you to do more interviews on science. I’m sick to death of hearing people opine about Comey and Mueller, so it was a nice break to hear about physics for a change. I think I’d rather listen to an interview with a master griller talking about the world of barbecue competitions than hear another word about the Russia investigation.

    • #1
    • April 22, 2018 at 10:08 am
    • Like
  2. Contributor

    Randy Weivoda (View Comment):

    Dave, this was a terrific interview. I’d encourage you to do more interviews on science. I’m sick to death of hearing people opine about Comey and Mueller, so it was a nice break to hear about physics for a change. I think I’d rather listen to an interview with a master griller talking about the world of barbecue competitions than hear another word about the Russia investigation.

    Brian was a great guest and his book’s an excellent read. We just now released a rare weekend episode which, based on your request, you should love. Thanks Randy.

    • #2
    • April 22, 2018 at 10:21 am
    • 1 like
  3. Member

    Great podcast (as is usual for you)! My Dad is one of three people generally credited with inventing GPS. The fights for priority have been vicious at times and a lot of ludicrous assertions have been made. It is similar to his comments about the Nobel Prize. I’ve read some of the private deliberations for the 2003 Draper Prize, which has been called the Nobel Prize for engineering, and their incompetence is astounding.

    • #3
    • April 23, 2018 at 9:13 pm
    • 1 like
  4. Contributor

    Richard Easton (View Comment):

    Great podcast (as is usual for you)! My Dad is one of three people generally credited with inventing GPS. The fights for priority have been vicious at times and a lot of ludicrous assertions have been made. It is similar to his comments about the Nobel Prize. I’ve read some of the private deliberations for the 2003 Draper Prize, which has been called the Nobel Prize for engineering, and their incompetence is astounding.

    Wow! That’s incredible Richard. 

    • #4
    • April 25, 2018 at 12:58 pm
    • Like