Victor Davis Hanson looks at how many of the most important stories of the last several years — from the Russian collusion charges to the COVID epidemic to the Capital riot to the Biden Administration’s handling of immigration — have been distorted by progressives in government and media until the public can barely decipher the truth anymore.

Subscribe to Victor Davis Hanson's The Classicist in Apple Podcasts (and leave a 5-star review, please!), or by RSS feed. For all our podcasts in one place, subscribe to the Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed in Apple Podcasts or by RSS feed.

Please Support Our Sponsors!

Honey

Policygenius

Now become a Ricochet member for only $5.00 a month! Join and see what you’ve been missing.

There are 4 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. Boney Cole Member
    Boney Cole
    @BoneyCole

    Thank you, Mr Hanson for your continued work on behalf of the nation.  
    Thank you for your work during the election. Trump was tremendously energetic working toward his re-election with his rallies, and with his Covid response.  I thought you were also tremendously energetic in your sphere as a public intellectual during the reelection campaign, and seemed to me to be working from a true patriotic impulse.  Your energy is even more remarkable considering the realm within which you are working. The incident at Stanford highlights the risks within which you have placed yourself. 
    That you have continued this work after the election is doubly admirable and important.  It must be tremendously tempting to enter into a peaceful retirement. 
    I think that you fill a unique role on Ricochet and National Review. I don’t know the fount of your energy, wisdom and strength, but I hope you will accept my appreciation for you work as long as you choose to labor. 
    The issues are real and serious.  Those of us out in flyover country, searching the public infosphere for sensible and insightful comment on our present crisis, find few places to reliably turn. 

    • #1
  2. Architectus Coolidge
    Architectus
    @Architectus

    Boney Cole (View Comment):

    Thank you, Mr Hanson for your continued work on behalf of the nation.
    Thank you for your work during the election. Trump was tremendously energetic working toward his re-election with his rallies, and with his Covid response. I thought you were also tremendously energetic in your sphere as a public intellectual during the reelection campaign, and seemed to me to be working from a true patriotic impulse. Your energy is even more remarkable considering the realm within which you are working. The incident at Stanford highlights the risks within which you have placed yourself.
    That you have continued this work after the election is doubly admirable and important. It must be tremendously tempting to enter into a peaceful retirement.
    I think that you fill a unique role on Ricochet and National Review. I don’t know the fount of your energy, wisdom and strength, but I hope you will accept my appreciation for you work as long as you choose to labor.
    The issues are real and serious. Those of us out in flyover country, searching the public infosphere for sensible and insightful comment on our present crisis, find few places to reliably turn.

    Dittos!

    • #2
  3. Wolfsheim Member
    Wolfsheim
    @Wolfsheim

    I don’t live in the United States but nonetheless pay great (perhaps excessive) attention to developments there. I’ve been advised that what I learn is filtered through whatever the opposite of rosy glasses may be and that I shouldn’t be so gloomy. Dr. Hanson’s unique perspective–from the Central Valley to the Stanford campus–is thus always most helpful. And yet now he too sounds quite a pessimistic note, and I fear that he is only being realistic…There may be, however, another factor to consider: We who have spent so many years in academia, whether in America or elsewhere, may be inclined to overestimate its influence…Having often fretted about “anti-intellectualism” in America and what seems to be contentment with pig-headed ignorance, I find myself, ironically enough, taking comfort in the thought that while too many Americans may be unable to locate Greece on the map, they are not so stupid or so gullible as to knuckle under the commands of the country’s woke Alice-in-Wonderland red queens…In the old East Germany, generations grew up never having known freedom, and yet there was resistance. Ordinary people knew that their masters were frauds. There is all the more reason to hope that Americans will be pushing back–and pushing back soon.

    • #3
  4. MISTER BITCOIN Inactive
    MISTER BITCOIN
    @MISTERBITCOIN

    Wolfsheim (View Comment):

    I don’t live in the United States but nonetheless pay great (perhaps excessive) attention to developments there. I’ve been advised that what I learn is filtered through whatever the opposite of rosy glasses may be and that I shouldn’t be so gloomy. Dr. Hanson’s unique perspective–from the Central Valley to the Stanford campus–is thus always most helpful. And yet now he too sounds quite a pessimistic note, and I fear that he is only being realistic…There may be, however, another factor to consider: We who have spent so many years in academia, whether in America or elsewhere, may be inclined to overestimate its influence…Having often fretted about “anti-intellectualism” in America and what seems to be contentment with pig-headed ignorance, I find myself, ironically enough, taking comfort in the thought that while too many Americans may be unable to locate Greece on the map, they are not so stupid or so gullible as to knuckle under the commands of the country’s woke Alice-in-Wonderland red queens…In the old East Germany, generations grew up never having known freedom, and yet there was resistance. Ordinary people knew that their masters were frauds. There is all the more reason to hope that Americans will be pushing back–and pushing back soon.

    We overestimate the influence of academics because academics have a great public relations team

    Most academics are useless — VDH is the outlier

     

    • #4