There are 9 comments.

  1. Clifford A. Brown Contributor

    “Controversial.”

    That weasel was made an example of. No military officer, of any rank, would tolerate such gross insubordination from a subordinate: “Sir, you didn’t put in a written order, so I didn’t have to do it.”

    The first 2-star general for whom I directly worked gave me a great lesson in followership. He called attention to the way a staff training team reacted to him. The staff training team existed to exercise and develop staffs in support of their commanders. The moment the commanding general opened his mouth, team members all had their notebooks out, pens poised, and proceeded to write down every single word he said.

    The general explained that that showed the doctrinally correct view of general officers’ words. All the words were to be treated as important, lawful guidance to their staff. The trainers now had the general’s words, and were checking everything the staff did to see if it conformed, to see if the general’s staff was operating competently and correctly in support of the general.

    In other contexts, the general coached me to read into phases and topics raised or not, to see if higher headquarters were reinforcing existing guidance (repetition) or changing direction or emphasis.

    • #1
    • November 26, 2019, at 3:25 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  2. Skyler Coolidge

    A tweet is a political statement and not an order. I agree 100%. Trump is known for puffery and exaggeration.

    However, defying the commander in chief is not the same thing. If a tweet is posted that you disagree with, you seek clarification, you don’t publicly contradict him.

    • #2
    • November 26, 2019, at 5:12 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  3. Skyler Coolidge

    It’s shocking to me that so many people have been so disloyal. I don’t know of anything Trump has done that is unlawful or unethical. How is it that so many Americans don’t understand the idea that the man on top gets to make the decisions? That we have so many back stabbing people at these high levels is as astounding as it is dangerous.

    • #3
    • November 26, 2019, at 5:36 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  4. Clifford A. Brown Contributor

    Skyler (View Comment):

    It’s shocking to me that so many people have been so disloyal. I don’t know of anything Trump has done that is unlawful or unethical. How is it that so many Americans don’t understand the idea that the man on top gets to make the decisions? That we have so many back stabbing people at these high levels is as astounding as it is dangerous.

    Yes. I’ve just laid out my views further here, including a perspective on senior, I mean really senior, leaders’ words I got from a general for whom I worked.

    • #4
    • November 26, 2019, at 6:05 PM PST
    • 1 like
  5. Fake John/Jane Galt Coolidge

    Skyler (View Comment):

    It’s shocking to me that so many people have been so disloyal. I don’t know of anything Trump has done that is unlawful or unethical. How is it that so many Americans don’t understand the idea that the man on top gets to make the decisions? That we have so many back stabbing people at these high levels is as astounding as it is dangerous.

    He is the unlawfully elected by the Russian’s and must’ve resisted at all cost.

    • #5
    • November 27, 2019, at 8:27 PM PST
    • Like
  6. JoyceCordi Coolidge

    Clifford A. Brown (View Comment):

    “Controversial.”

    That weasel was made an example of. No military officer, of any rank, would tolerate such gross insubordination from a subordinate: “Sir, you didn’t put in a written order, so I didn’t have to do it.”

    The first 2-star general for whom I directly worked gave me a great lesson in followership. He called attention to the way a staff training team reacted to him. The staff training team existed to exercise and develop staffs in support of their commanders. The moment the commanding general opened his mouth, team members all had their notebooks out, pens poised, and proceeded to write down every single word he said.

    The general explained that that showed the doctrinally correct view of general officers’ words. All the words were to be treated as important, lawful guidance to their staff. The trainers now had the general’s words, and were checking everything the staff did to see if it conformed, to see if the general’s staff was operating competently and correctly in support of the general.

    In other contexts, the general coached me to read into phases and topics raised or not, to see if higher headquarters were reinforcing existing guidance (repetition) or changing direction or emphasis.

    @cliffordabrown — Thanks for your thoughts. My concern stems from two different places:

    First: The intervention (repeatedly) in a lawfully predicated military judicial proceeding is not conducive to the “good order” of the military, in general, but especially in a situation where a newly appointed admiral is there to restore “good order and discipline” in the SEAL organization.

    General Miley, Secretary Esper and Secretary Pompeo — all urged the President not to interfere — pointing to “good order, discipline, and their oaths as West Pointers.

    Second: Gallagher has repeatedly and systematically gone over the head of his superiors — out of the chain of command to televise his grievances to the President — when Gallagher didn’t like the decisions through that chain of command.

    In the private sector, where I come from, going around several layers of administration and organization in your chain to appeal directly to the CEO would get your ass fired without severance. The word we would use is insubordinate.

    Esper fired Spenser for doing exactly the thing that Trump rewarded Gallagher for doing!

    And Gallagher richly deserved to lose his Trident. If he didn’t know that is where the review would come out — he wouldn’t be all over TV — begging for Trumpian intervention.

    Next stop for Gallagher: The Trump Rally stage. As a former military man, yourself, that should make you sooooooo very proud!

     

    • #6
    • December 4, 2019, at 6:48 PM PST
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  7. JoyceCordi Coolidge

    Skyler (View Comment):

    A tweet is a political statement and not an order. I agree 100%. Trump is known for puffery and exaggeration.

    However, defying the commander in chief is not the same thing. If a tweet is posted that you disagree with, you seek clarification, you don’t publicly contradict him.

    @Skyler

    And posing with the corpse of an enemy is worthy of the loss of the Trident.

    Gallagher’s actions — from the beginning of his confinement — have defied the chain of command.

    Esper fired Spenser for doing exactly the same thing that Trump has rewarded Gallagher for doing!

    My concern is primary for the guys in the field. Gallagher’s behavior and the justification offered by the President puts others who might fall into enemy hands at greater risk.

    The rules must apply to our warriors — if we are going to be the “good guys” — and if we are not the “good guys” — then what are we doing at war?

    • #7
    • December 4, 2019, at 6:53 PM PST
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  8. Skyler Coolidge

    JoyceCordi (View Comment):
    Esper fired Spenser for doing exactly the same thing that Trump has rewarded Gallagher for doing!

    That is a rather bizarre interpretation. Trump is the Commander in Chief. He is the head of the military. He holds pardon power, not only for judicial actions, he is also the source of administrative law (hence the name). Authority is ALWAYS allowed to reach down the chain of command, at any time, for any reason. It is the authority’s chain, and the authority can use that chain as it sees fit.

    • #8
    • December 4, 2019, at 7:02 PM PST
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  9. Skyler Coolidge

    JoyceCordi (View Comment):

    And posing with the corpse of an enemy is worthy of the loss of the Trident.

     

    I’m not so squeamish about that. I couldn’t care less if he posed with a corpse. I care if he posed with a corpse in violation of an order, but the act itself is unremarkable to me.

    • #9
    • December 4, 2019, at 7:03 PM PST
    • Like