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There are 6 comments.

  1. Eugene Kriegsmann Member

    It probably isn’t politic to mention this, but during my long career in the school system beginning with my two years in Bedford-Stuyvesant, anti-semitic views were pretty openly express by black kids I worked with. Most of them wouldn’t know a Jew from a hole in the wall, but they used anti-semitic comments pretty freely. It isn’t hard to figure out from where these views generate. We have heard Jesse Jackson and several other prominent black leaders use less than complimentary terms in discussing Jews. Given that, Ilhan Omar’s comments shouldn’t be that big of a surprise. Where making antisemitic statements has become pretty rare among whites, it is not at all such among blacks. It is almost expected in some neighborhoods. Both hers and AOC’s may not be at all uncomfortable with openly stating these views. There is a long history of this behavior. It was documented in the book which accompanied the Harlem On My Mind display in the Metropolitan Museum Art in New York City in 1968. only in the book it wasn’t denigrated, it was justified and nearly lauded. That the Democrats in the House were unwilling to stand against antisemitism is unsurprising since the Congressional Black Caucus is a part of that group. The hypocrisy of the Democrats has never been more obvious. They are doing it under the cover of anti-Trump resistance, and anyone who can’t see that isn’t looking.

    • #1
    • March 11, 2019, at 9:47 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  2. filmklassik Member

    Fine podcast. It was good to hear Jay, Mona and their guest Ben decry the undeniable antisemitism on the part of Rep. Omar and a big percentage of the Left … and also decry the absurdity, and vileness, of the notion of reparations.

    It was the first time in recent memory that Jay and Mona saw fit to point out at length (operative phrase) how insane the Left has become.

    In other words, it was a very Commentary-esque — or Goldberg-esque — podcast. And this, of course, is when you express your well-founded aversion toward the current state of the Republican Party (jerk-offs all — practically) while not sparing the gunpowder when it comes to taking shots at the Left.

    • #2
    • March 11, 2019, at 12:37 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  3. Leslie Watkins Member

    Very much enjoyed this podcast. I have a couple of random responses, or, whatever.

    With Ilhan Omar, I think we have a Dorian Gray-ish situation. The pose is lovely but, I believe, belies a hostility bordering on contempt (at least, that’s how I see her smile). Maybe it’s because she came here as a teenager, but I just don’t get her expressed disappointment with where she ended up in comparison to what she was “promised.” No, I think she does not speak for herself or her community, but for the men in her world who hold sway. Why doesn’t someone call her out for her own ostensible dual loyalties? And, seriously, why doesn’t someone ask her what she means by hypnotized? (Christopher Hitchens: Are there no reporters with any curiosity anymore?) I agree with Jay that Omar’s comments would be run of the mill on virtually any American campus, but it’s exactly because of that that I say her comments need to be called out. Actually, her comments don’t need to be trumpeted as much as engaged. They would surely wilt. (Do you think any reporter knows that?)

    I agree that the idea of reparations is nonsensical. And I would bet that most people who are braying the call are white because I think most black people would be either annoyed or embarrassed by such a thing. As if they need white folks. Good grief. That said, I would be willing to consider some kind of country payback to the descendants of those who were lynched. American chattel slavery was a crime against man but not against history. Jim Crow was a crime against history. We claimed we were better than we were, and we weren’t, in a legal sense. I say this as a native of Louisiana whose mother was present at a lynching in New Orleans in the 1920s. I have no idea if the practicalities are practical, but morally, even though I was not alive and had nothing to do with it, I would be open to trying to address the especial American stain of lynching.

    Added after the fact: This fellow Benjamin Parker has a lot of good things to say. It isn’t just that he’s well spoken; he’s well thought out. That’s tough to get to these days given the fixation on branding and the like. He’s on his way, it seems. I imagine his parents are immensely proud–and should be.

    • #3
    • March 11, 2019, at 9:03 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  4. filmklassik Member

    Agree with you about Omar’s insincere (and, because of that insincerity, rather insidious) smile.

    And Jay’s casual dismissal of the prevalence of antisemitism among the young was chilling, because of what it bodes for the future. Is Jay that unconcerned about it? (“America’s young people hate Israel? Snooze. Wake me when things get interesting.”)

    As for reparations for lynching, even if I agreed with this idea in principle (which I don’t), one doesn’t need the imagination of Ray Bradbury to foresee the problems this would cause.

    “Wait, why only lynching? Our grandfather got dragged for friggin’ miles behind a team of horses and died three days later! Are you saying we don’t get money too?!”

    ”Our grandmother got raped by a crew of farm hands before they stabbed her to death. Are you denying us money because she was stabbed instead of lynched?”

    Etc.

    • #4
    • March 11, 2019, at 9:31 PM PDT
    • Like
  5. Leslie Watkins Member

    filmklassik (View Comment):

    Agree with you about Omar’s insincere (and, because of that insincerity, rather insidious) smile.

    And Jay’s causal dismissal of the prevalence of antisemitism among the young was chilling, because of what it bodes for the future. Is Jay that unconcerned about it? (“Young people hate Israel? Snooze. Wake me when things get interesting.”)

    As for reparations for lynching, even if I agreed with this idea in principal (which I don’t), one doesn’t need the imagination of Ray Bradbury to foresee the problems this would cause:

    “Wait, why only lynching? Our grandfather got dragged for friggin’ miles behind a team of horses and died three days later! Are you saying we don’t get money too?!”

    ”Our grandmother got raped by a crew of farm hands before they stabbed her to death. Are you denying us money because she was stabbed instead of lynched?”

    Etc.

    Good points. All I’m saying is, as a person who feels very lucky–yes, proud–to be American, and perhaps even more because I am a southerner, I recognize the moral lacuna that is lynching and would be willing for our society to address it as a historical injustice. Crime is crime. Injustice is something else. 

    • #5
    • March 11, 2019, at 9:39 PM PDT
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  6. Daniel Sterman Listener

    Leslie Watkins (View Comment):
    This fellow Benjamin Parker has a lot of good things to say. It isn’t just that he’s well spoken; he’s well thought out. That’s tough to get to these days given the fixation on branding and the like. He’s on his way, it seems. I imagine his parents are immensely proud–and should be.

    I’d imagine his mother is extremely proud of him, or she wouldn’t have hosted him on her podcast :)

    • #6
    • March 11, 2019, at 9:43 PM PDT
    • Like