Vegans, Vaginas and a Greased Piglet

Note: This week’s episode of London Calling, was recorded several hours before the Conservative Party’s vote of confidence in Boris Johnson’s premiership.

Update: Johnson survives, 211-148. Percentage-wise that is much worse than the vote that signaled the beginning of the end for Theresa May in 2019. Number 10 had hoped to keep the rebellion under 100 votes. 

Toby and James discuss whether Boris can survive, assuming he wins the confidence vote; who among his successors would be better, if any, including those who attended the meeting of the Bilderberg Group over the weekend.

Then it’s a review of the Jubilee celebrations and why Prince Williams feels he can embrace the climate emergency agenda without saying anything remotely politically contentious and whether the multi-ethnic nature of the celebrants gives the lie to Stephen Fry’s claim that British society is deeply racist.

In Culture Corner, Top Gun: Maverick, The Pistols, Season 5 of The Last Kingdom and Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope (1815 – 1882).

This week’s opening sound is Sir Graham Brady announcing the confidence vote.

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There are 8 comments.

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  1. Al Sparks Thatcher
    Al Sparks
    @AlSparks

    I’m finding James Delingpole to be tiresome.   While I haven’t bought into his conspiracy theories since the 1970’s (for me, it was the Council of Foreign Relations, by the time people started talking about the Trilateral Commission I had abandoned the whole thing), I at least found the good natured ribbing Delingpole would give Toby Young over their differences to be endearing.

    It seems that Delingpole has become more bitter as time has gone on, and now he’s dismissive instead with his tendency to interrupt, and talk about how much this all is a waste of time.  Why bother, he says?  He no longer finds Young to be misguided but funny, but just plain dumb.

    And his assertion that we American listeners aren’t interested in Britain and Toby’s take on current affairs in his own country is off base.

    Delingpole has changed, and he’s becoming less attractive to listen to.

     

    • #1
  2. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    I agree Al that I’m interested in British politics, etc. I listen to the BBC hour and like to get Toby (Team Toby) and James’ slants on all that. I haven’t given up on James completely but I do understand your feelings about him. Cheers.

    • #2
  3. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    colleenb (View Comment):

    I agree Al that I’m interested in British politics, etc. I listen to the BBC hour and like to get Toby (Team Toby) and James’ slants on all that. I haven’t given up on James completely but I do understand your feelings about him. Cheers.

    As a British National, I’m following, and have followed, British politics for years. I don’t know one person in my life who could name Boris Johnson as the current PM, let alone his current travails, with the exception of my Aussie friend. And while I always had friends interested in a Royal Wedding, and in the case of Diana, a royal funeral, not a one cares about the Queen’s jubilee. They don’t have anything against Queen Elizabeth; it just isn’t their jam.

    My mother always complained that Yanks thought everything revolved around America. It frustrated her mightily. I agree with her, but it doesn’t frustrate me. I find it kind of charming.  Back when I was in high school, everyone was encouraged to learn French, as that would become the international language. Everyone in America said:  Really? Ya think? Huh. And then carried on. Kind of like the metric system.

    • #3
  4. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    Annefy (View Comment):

    colleenb (View Comment):

    I agree Al that I’m interested in British politics, etc. I listen to the BBC hour and like to get Toby (Team Toby) and James’ slants on all that. I haven’t given up on James completely but I do understand your feelings about him. Cheers.

    As a British National, I’m following, and have followed, British politics for years. I don’t know one person in my life who could name Boris Johnson as the current PM, let alone his current travails, with the exception of my Aussie friend. And while I always had friends interested in a Royal Wedding, and in the case of Diana, a royal funeral, not a one cares about the Queen’s jubilee. They don’t have anything against Queen Elizabeth; it just isn’t their jam.

    My mother always complained that Yanks thought everything revolved around America. It frustrated her mightily. I agree with her, but it doesn’t frustrate me. I find it kind of charming. Back when I was in high school, everyone was encouraged to learn French, as that would become the international language. Everyone in America said: Really? Ya think? Huh. And then carried on. Kind of like the metric system.

    Very true about Americans being oriented toward America. It does seem to have been and continue to be that way. I also generally find it charming. I guess I’m too close and too frustrated by American politics/culture/media so I listen to the BBC, France 24, and NHK for news. They are all greatly leftists but you do get some in depth reporting that you don’t seem to get with any of the regular media in the US. Also I did have to find out all about the Platinum Pudding and how it was chosen for the Queen’s celebration. Cheers.

    • #4
  5. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    colleenb (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    colleenb (View Comment):

    I agree Al that I’m interested in British politics, etc. I listen to the BBC hour and like to get Toby (Team Toby) and James’ slants on all that. I haven’t given up on James completely but I do understand your feelings about him. Cheers.

    As a British National, I’m following, and have followed, British politics for years. I don’t know one person in my life who could name Boris Johnson as the current PM, let alone his current travails, with the exception of my Aussie friend. And while I always had friends interested in a Royal Wedding, and in the case of Diana, a royal funeral, not a one cares about the Queen’s jubilee. They don’t have anything against Queen Elizabeth; it just isn’t their jam.

    My mother always complained that Yanks thought everything revolved around America. It frustrated her mightily. I agree with her, but it doesn’t frustrate me. I find it kind of charming. Back when I was in high school, everyone was encouraged to learn French, as that would become the international language. Everyone in America said: Really? Ya think? Huh. And then carried on. Kind of like the metric system.

    Very true about Americans being oriented toward America. It does seem to have been and continue to be that way. I also generally find it charming. I guess I’m too close and too frustrated by American politics/culture/media so I listen to the BBC, France 24, and NHK for news. They are all greatly leftists but you do get some in depth reporting that you don’t seem to get with any of the regular media in the US. Also I did have to find out all about the Platinum Pudding and how it was chosen for the Queen’s celebration. Cheers.

    I suspect not a few Americans know of the American-born Prime Minister who engineered Brexit; though Margaret Thatcher and Winston Churchill would probably exhaust their knowledge of his predecessors.

    • #5
  6. Bishop Wash Member
    Bishop Wash
    @BishopWash

    colleenb (View Comment):

    I agree Al that I’m interested in British politics, etc. I listen to the BBC hour and like to get Toby (Team Toby) and James’ slants on all that. I haven’t given up on James completely but I do understand your feelings about him. Cheers.

    Count me in too. I wish it could get back to the boys that a lot of us listen to them for their takes on British politics. I’ve been surprised at how much they know about American politics but suppose they follow it because of their jobs. 

    • #6
  7. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHill
    @EJHill

    Bishop Wash: I’ve been surprised at how much they know about American politics but suppose they follow it because of their jobs.

    Unfortunately too much of the world revolves around Washington and that means that our politics are watched and fretted about by people all over. That doesn’t mean they’re well informed because what they know (or think they know) comes from the NYT, the WaPost and CNN.

    On the other hand, I am in the opposite corner here, an American who has been dropped into their world. (This is my third year of producing the show.) The extent of nationalization (or “nationalisation”) remains astonishing to me. To think that there is a cabinet minister who is responsible for all the fire services in  England and Wales (but not Scotland and N. Ireland) is just weird. I cannot fathom federal oversight of our local FD and it being the same one responsible for immigration (The Home Office.)

    When an Englishman speaks of their “constitution,” it is not a real thing, i.e. it’s not a single document. It is the collective output of Parliament. Anything that body wishes to do is legal, no matter what. The Blair Government created their version of the Supreme Court (proposed in 2003, passed in 2005 and implemented in 2009) but it is just really the last court to uphold any act of Parliament. (They also hear civil cases.) The idea that a Supreme Court can save you from bad law is purely an American thing.

    Likewise, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, a creation of Trudeau I, it avoids US style substantive due process in favor of procedural due process. In other words, the Canadians are happy to take away your rights provided they followed a parliamentary approved process to do so. That’s why some Americans are bewildered by the actions of other Anglosphere nations. We’re all offspring of the Mother Country and because we rejected the Westminster system we are more proactively rights-oriented. Its also why the American left has yearned for a Westminster-style government for generations.

     

    • #7
  8. Bishop Wash Member
    Bishop Wash
    @BishopWash

    EJHill (View Comment):

    Bishop Wash: I’ve been surprised at how much they know about American politics but suppose they follow it because of their jobs.

    Unfortunately too much of the world revolves around Washington and that means that our politics are watched and fretted about by people all over. That doesn’t mean they’re well informed because what they know (or think they know) comes from the NYT, the WaPost and CNN.

    On the other hand, I am in the opposite corner here, an American who has been dropped into their world. (This is my third year of producing the show.) The extent of nationalization (or “nationalisation”) remains astonishing to me. To think that there is a cabinet minister who is responsible for all the fire services in England and Wales (but not Scotland and N. Ireland) is just weird. I cannot fathom federal oversight of our local FD and it being the same one responsible for immigration (The Home Office.)

    When an Englishman speaks of their “constitution,” it is not a real thing, i.e. it’s not a single document. It is the collective output of Parliament. Anything that body wishes to do is legal, no matter what. The Blair Government created their version of the Supreme Court (proposed in 2003, passed in 2005 and implemented in 2009) but it is just really the last court to uphold any act of Parliament. (They also hear civil cases.) The idea that a Supreme Court can save you from bad law is purely an American thing.

    Likewise, the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, a creation of Trudeau I, it avoids US style substantive due process in favor of procedural due process. In other words, the Canadians are happy to take away your rights provided they followed a parliamentary approved process to do so. That’s why some Americans are bewildered by the actions of other Anglosphere nations. We’re all offspring of the Mother Country and because we rejected the Westminster system we are more proactively rights-oriented. Its also why the American left has yearned for a Westminster-style government for generations.

     

    Thank you for the insight. It was interesting during the last two years seeing how people’s baselines differ from country to country. A lot seemingly are willing to give the government a lot of control. 

    • #8
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