The I-Word Podcast

Welcome friends to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for April 24, 2019 it is the I-Word edition of the show with your T-Word (“terrific”) hosts Todd Feinburg, radio guy, east coast and Mike Stopa, AI guy, west coast. We are here every week to blast you with the latest news and political commentary that you so deeply need.

This week, the I-Word. Impeachment. Who be fer it and who be agin it? Does Rachel Maddow have any choice really? It matters not a whit what the Mueller report said, Maddow and her like-minded fellow travellers were going to continue to be pro-impeachment no matter what. That’s what happens when you are insulated from empiricism. But how about the legacy media like WaPo or the NYT? And then, how about the Dems, the Reps, the candidates? We will analyze.

And speaking of candidates erstwhile Harvard Law professor Liz Warren is out ahead of the curve in the wonk world *and* with calling for DJT impeachment. Is Liz going to surprise everyone and walk away with the nomination? We remain to be convinced…but we are pondering.

Our shower thoughts are provocative (what did you think?) and our hidden gem this week is from the New Broadway Cast of Pippin, Morning Glow. This is a fabulous piece of music. Enjoy!

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Published in: Elections, Politics

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  1. OccupantCDN Coolidge
    OccupantCDN
    @OccupantCDN

    I think the idea of a debt forgiveness for college is workable. IF the school takes the hit. Lets say there are a bunch of kids out there who have taken a 4 year degree (taken over 6 years) in Latin lit or something else as outlandishly useless – then the school that granted the degree should take the hit when the kid defaults on his loans. The cost of a degree should have some relationship to the value of the career that degree should unlock for you. Just like any other investment. The schools that have been over promising and under delivering would go out of business.

    • #1
  2. Taras Coolidge
    Taras
    @Taras

    Who says no Republican will vote for impeachment?

    The rewards available to turncoat “conservatives” like Charlie Sykes and Max Boot and Jennifer Rubin are quite substantial.

    • #2
  3. colleenb Member
    colleenb
    @colleenb

    Uh oh Stopa. You’re making me nostalgic. I actually saw the original Pippin cast in DC before they debuted on Broadway – Irene Ryan!, Jon Rubenstein!, Ben Vereen!! Stephen Swartz sitting in the back of the theater working on rewrites. I agree not a top American musical but a good, solid one. And who woulda thunk that a musical about Charlemagne and family would be so fun.

    • #3
  4. Michael Stopa Contributor
    Michael Stopa
    @MichaelStopa

    colleenb (View Comment):

    Uh oh Stopa. You’re making me nostalgic. I actually saw the original Pippin cast in DC before they debuted on Broadway – Irene Ryan!, Jon Rubenstein!, Ben Vereen!! Stephen Swartz sitting in the back of the theater working on rewrites. I agree not a top American musical but a good, solid one. And who woulda thunk that a musical about Charlemagne and family would be so fun.

    I love this one so much, Colleen. Amazing that you saw the original cast! Would have loved to.

    • #4
  5. Todd Feinburg Contributor
    Todd Feinburg
    @toddfeinburg

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    I think the idea of a debt forgiveness for college is workable. IF the school takes the hit. Lets say there are a bunch of kids out there who have taken a 4 year degree (taken over 6 years) in Latin lit or something else as outlandishly useless – then the school that granted the degree should take the hit when the kid defaults on his loans. The cost of a degree should have some relationship to the value of the career that degree should unlock for you. Just like any other investment. The schools that have been over promising and under delivering would go out of business.

    Or if you just put responsibility for the loans on the schools and let them figure out the rest on their own because they have skin in the game. Loans could become targeted for very specific programs where there’s roi. Still, it keeps govt in the higher education business, and govt makes a mess of things.

    • #5
  6. OccupantCDN Coolidge
    OccupantCDN
    @OccupantCDN

    Todd Feinburg (View Comment):

    OccupantCDN (View Comment):

    I think the idea of a debt forgiveness for college is workable. IF the school takes the hit. Lets say there are a bunch of kids out there who have taken a 4 year degree (taken over 6 years) in Latin lit or something else as outlandishly useless – then the school that granted the degree should take the hit when the kid defaults on his loans. The cost of a degree should have some relationship to the value of the career that degree should unlock for you. Just like any other investment. The schools that have been over promising and under delivering would go out of business.

    Or if you just put responsibility for the loans on the schools and let them figure out the rest on their own because they have skin in the game. Loans could become targeted for very specific programs where there’s roi. Still, it keeps govt in the higher education business, and govt makes a mess of things.

    Sounds good. There are 21 forms of debt not discharged in bankruptcy. Student loans are among them. Maybe the simplest thing would be to allow student loans to be discharged in bankruptcy.

    I wonder how having debts not discharged is not a violation of the 13th amendment? If taken to the extreme doesnt this lead to peonage?

    • #6