Americans Forced to Work Job Just to Put Food on Table

 

A husband and father to three children, Dan Allen has been receiving a vast array of city, state, and federal unemployment benefits since being furloughed from his job when the COVID-19 crisis struck last March. Nevertheless, Mr. Allen and millions of Americans just like him are learning the hard way that government largesse just isn’t enough. Shortly after the initial lockdown last spring, Allen decided to swallow his pride and return to work.

“I’m not proud of it. But my wife and I sat down and crunched the numbers and there was no way around it: I was going to have to begin earning again,” he said.

Policymakers in Washington are struggling to deal with a problem that has perplexed public officials since the New Deal: how to keep people from relying on work to support themselves?

True, some Americans do better than others on social welfare programs. Some, particularly in America’s most progressive cities and states, even seem to thrive on them. Others, however, have difficulty escaping an endless cycle of dependency on hard work, saving, and investment. And it is these Americans whom policymakers are most concerned about.

“Our studies suggest that there’s a cultural component,” said Theodore M. Stanley, a research fellow at the Center For The Emerging Majority, a progressive think tank. “It’s breaking that cycle of work-paycheck-work-paycheck which gets passed down through generations which presents the greatest challenge to policymakers.” Mr. Stanley advocates, among other things, a gradual reduction in the retirement age.

While total dependency on government may be the ideal, some planners look to compromises made in countries such as Greece, where those who insist on working are given largely harmless positions in government.

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  1. Kozak Member
    Kozak
    @Kozak

    • #1
  2. David Deeble Member
    David Deeble
    @DavidDeeble

    What a mess! Could just as easily have come from the Klan.

    • #2
  3. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    Oh what a tangled web we weave,

    When first we practice to achieve.

    –  William Fakespeare

    • #3
  4. Kozak Member
    Kozak
    @Kozak

    David Deeble (View Comment):

    What a mess! Could just as easily have come from the Klan.

    Your tax dollars at work.

    • #4
  5. The_Admin() Admin
    The_Admin()
    @Max

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Oh what a tangled web we weave,

    When first we practice to achieve.

    – William Fakespeare

    Pretty sure that Faulkner.

    • #5
  6. Caryn Thatcher
    Caryn
    @Caryn

    The_Admin() (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Oh what a tangled web we weave,

    When first we practice to achieve.

    – William Fakespeare

    Pretty sure that Faulkner.

    Fauxkner, I believe.

    • #6
  7. Caryn Thatcher
    Caryn
    @Caryn

    Kozak (View Comment):

    You would think a national museum might get the hanging of the flag right.  But, then, everything else is bass-ackwards, so why not the flag?

    • #7
  8. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Caryn (View Comment):

    The_Admin() (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Oh what a tangled web we weave,

    When first we practice to achieve.

    – William Fakespeare

    Pretty sure that Faulkner.

    Fauxkner, I believe.

    Somebody ask Andrea Mitchell. She’ll know.

    • #8
  9. Jimmy Carter Member
    Jimmy Carter
    @JimmyCarter

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Oh what a tangled web we weave,

    When first we practice to achieve.

    – William Fakespeare

    Oh, what a tangled web We weave,

    When We first practice to conceive. 

    – Kelly Bundy

    • #9
  10. Dr. Bastiat Member
    Dr. Bastiat
    @drbastiat

    Outstanding post.  That’s awesome.

    • #10
  11. Living High and Wide Inactive
    Living High and Wide
    @OldDanRhody

    “No one who rises before dawn 360 days a year fails to make his family rich.”  –  Chinese Proverb

    • #11
  12. The_Admin() Admin
    The_Admin()
    @Max

    Living High and Wide (View Comment):

    “No one who rises before dawn 360 days a year fails to make his family rich.” – Chinese Proverb

    Yeah, but the Chinese Communists define family as the Communist party elite.

    • #12
  13. Living High and Wide Inactive
    Living High and Wide
    @OldDanRhody

    The_Admin() (View Comment):

    Living High and Wide (View Comment):

    “No one who rises before dawn 360 days a year fails to make his family rich.” – Chinese Proverb

    Yeah, but the Chinese Communists define family as the Communist party elite.

    And aren’t they being made rich?

    • #13
  14. GLDIII Temporarily Essential Reagan
    GLDIII Temporarily Essential
    @GLDIII

    I know you think you’re doing satire……

    • #14
  15. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    Kozak (View Comment):

    I really like this description of White People.  What was all the fuss about it?

    • #15
  16. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    Living High and Wide (View Comment):

    “No one who rises before dawn 360 days a year fails to make his family rich.” – Chinese Proverb

    Except, of course, for the average Chinese peasant.  And there are still millions of them in the Communist Chinese countryside.

    • #16
  17. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    When I first met my now-wife a little over 40 years ago, her sister had recently married into a family that was on second and third generation dependence on government handouts. Government handouts versus working is definitely a learned behavior transmitted through family and social expectations. 

    • #17
  18. Columbo Member
    Columbo
    @Columbo

    The horror, the horror!

    • #18
  19. Living High and Wide Inactive
    Living High and Wide
    @OldDanRhody

    RushBabe49 (View Comment):

    Living High and Wide (View Comment):

    “No one who rises before dawn 360 days a year fails to make his family rich.” – Chinese Proverb

    Except, of course, for the average Chinese peasant. And there are still millions of them in the Communist Chinese countryside.

    I first heard this proverb with the conclusion, “will fail to feed his family.”  I like that one better, but didn’t find anything I could pretend was a valid source.

    • #19
  20. Kozak Member
    Kozak
    @Kozak

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Kozak (View Comment):

    I really like this description of White People. What was all the fuss about it?

    Just imagine if this had been published by Storm Front instead of the Smithsonian.  The SJW’s would be all up in arms about it as racist.

    • #20
  21. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Kozak (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Kozak (View Comment):

    I really like this description of White People. What was all the fuss about it?

    Just imagine if this had been published by Storm Front instead of the Smithsonian. The SJW’s would be all up in arms about it as racist.

    I’d say it’s racist regardless of who says it.

    • #21
  22. Gossamer Cat Coolidge
    Gossamer Cat
    @GossamerCat

    You should submit this to the Babylon Bee.

    • #22
  23. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    Percival (View Comment):

    Kozak (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Kozak (View Comment):

    I really like this description of White People. What was all the fuss about it?

    Just imagine if this had been published by Storm Front instead of the Smithsonian. The SJW’s would be all up in arms about it as racist.

    I’d say it’s racist regardless of who says it.

    I dunno.  Rugged individualism, nuclear family, objective rational linear thinking, delayed gratification, plan for future, hard work as key to success.  I kind of like this racism!

    • #23
  24. MiMac Thatcher
    MiMac
    @MiMac

    Kozak (View Comment):

    When I read that a few months ago I realized I was whiter than rice, in a cup of milk, on a paper plate, in a snowstorm…..

    addendum-OK I must admit, I stole the line from Major Payne. But I don’t think it qualifies as cultural appropriation.

    • #24
  25. MiMac Thatcher
    MiMac
    @MiMac

    Kozak (View Comment):

    duplicate posting

    • #25
  26. Roderic Reagan
    Roderic
    @rhfabian

    “White Culture” appears to be a racialized version of bourgeois culture, which is not confined to any particular race.  Not all whites have bourgeois values, and we see many young white people sitting at home, drawing disability payments, drinking beer, and playing video games these days and increasing numbers of out of wedlock births.  Nor are the ideas that people should stay in school, make good grades, wait until matrimony to have children, etc. confined to the white race.  Government systems like the Great Society that encouraged a departure from such values have contributed to the dissipation of poor peoples of all races.  

    • #26
  27. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Roderic (View Comment):

    “White Culture” appears to be a racialized version of bourgeois culture, which is not confined to any particular race. Not all whites have bourgeois values, and we see many young white people sitting at home, drawing disability payments, drinking beer, and playing video games these days and increasing numbers of out of wedlock births. Nor are the ideas that people should stay in school, make good grades, wait until matrimony to have children, etc. confined to the white race. Government systems like the Great Society that encouraged a departure from such values have contributed to the dissipation of poor peoples of all races.

    That is a good point.  And it ties the current movement to the long history of leftwing opposition to bourgeois culture. 

    There has also been a long tradition of homosexual opposition to bourgeois culture, which is why I’ve long been suspicious of the “marriage equality” movement. On the other hand, some homosexual people I have known seem to want to make their relationships a part of bourgeois culture. I don’t detect any fakery or self-delusion about it, so maybe it isn’t so simple.  But self-delusion is hard to detect, as we saw with the hysteria surrounding the Russia-collusion hoax. So I’m really not sure what to make of it, and probably won’t be sure for a long time.

    But bourgeois culture is definitely a barrier to leftwing aspirations. 

    • #27
  28. Columbo Member
    Columbo
    @Columbo

    Women and children hardest hit.

    • #28
  29. JimGoneWild Coolidge
    JimGoneWild
    @JimGoneWild

    The need to knock every American value will put us on the fastest sled-ride to Socialism.

    • #29