Tag: COVID-19

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Generally, I’m not one of those people who is paranoid about my privacy. I try not to give my personal information needlessly, but I do appreciate, for example, the patient portals for my health care. In reading the latest information about “contact tracing” for COVID-19, however, we are watching the beginning of the most dangerous […]

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It was one thing when people argued over ventilators and lockdowns. But naturally, a culture war had to arise out of the coronavirus, and wearing masks is it. Who should wear them and when? Should the government mandate it and for how long? Also, is it right to shame people who choose not to wear one?

Links to the stories Park mentions:

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. I Wear a Mask

 

Obviously not while inside by myself, but I wear a mask whenever I expect to walk by people or I am getting a delivery. It’s partly because it is required by our crazy governor (statewide lockdowns are stupid), and partly because I want to protect other people. There’s also the fact that we will enforce masking at work, and I’ll be damned if I enforce a rule I won’t practice myself. (I became a stringent recycler in my private life when I was asked to implement a recycling program at my last job) It also is not really harming me, and I try to wear only quality American-made masks and bandanas.

I even stopped a pair of police officers and asked if the CPD didn’t give them masks. I said I’d give them bandanas suitable for masks if the department had left them out. Turns out they had just taken them off to talk outside their car. We chatted a bit before I finished heading home with dinner. It’s not like you could actually social distance from your partner in a squad car…

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

“Governments cannot openly admit that the “controlled easing” of COVID-19 lockdowns in fact means controlled progress toward so-called herd immunity to the virus. Much better, then, to pursue this objective silently, under a cloud of obfuscation, and hope that a vaccine will arrive before most of the population gets infected” –Robert Skidelsky Skidelsky is a […]

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Join host Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer’s Bill Smith in a conversation with Hannah Mamuszka, expert in diagnostic medicine, on why the U.S. lacked adequate early testing, what current testing looks like in the Commonwealth, and where testing technology needs to be to support public gatherings in the future.

Hannah Mamuszka is Founder & CEO of ALVA10, a healthcare technology firm. Hannah has spent her 20+ year career in diagnostics – both in pharma and at diagnostics companies, in the lab and on the business side. She believes that the challenges of diagnostic technology fully impacting patient care are more commercial than technical, and conceived of ALVA10 to create a mechanism to pull technology into healthcare by aligning incentives through data. She regularly speaks on issues regarding advancement of technology in healthcare, is on the Board of Directors for two diagnostic companies and writes a column on the value of diagnostics for the Journal of Precision Medicine.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Fun with Statistics

 

I have been manipulating statistics professionally for decades. It’s all been harmless fun, really, because I have been blessed to work in the candy store of life — sports television. One thing I learned over many decades of practice is that through omission and qualifiers, I can pretty much conjure up any number — positive or negative — to back up any argument you wish to make. And that is why I look at all the stats the media and governments throw out at us on the current pandemic with a bit of a jaundiced eye.

Take a look at the following from Google:

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. On Hamsters and Humanity

 

A recent study using hamsters to test the efficacy of wearing masks to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 appeared on various news sites.

Tests on hamsters showed wearing surgical masks can significantly reduce the non-contact transmission of the deadly Covid-19 virus, especially when masks were worn by infected individuals, according to a study led by HKU infectious disease expert Prof Yuen Kwok-yung.

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The following was published in 1866. He was in the hospital from the middle of Lent till after Easter. When he was better, he remembered the dreams he had had while he was feverish and delirious. He dreamt that the whole world was condemned to a terrible new strange plague that had come to Europe […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. It’s Tiiiime … Boogity, Boogity, Boogity!

 

Professional sports started breaking free from the COVID-19 craziness this past weekend. UFC led the way, followed by a more timid, painfully politically correct NASCAR. Meanwhile, the boys of summer looked to be dropping the ball again, Major League Baseball likely losing bigly in a squeeze play between the National Basketball Association, National Hockey League, and National Football League. Between the NASCAR messaging and UFC, I’ll likely be watching UFC, not NASCAR, this year.

“It’s . . . TIIIME!” 

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Member Post

 

First, let me make clear that I am not belittling this pandemic or the destruction of individual lives and families that have resulted. I am not even critiquing the governmental responses to date; hindsight is too easy to use to denigrate others. However, we do need to begin to consider what happened and what we […]

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If you’re like Dave Carter, you are hearing a cacophony of experts and their contradictory opinions and you’re wondering who to believe? Should we be wearing masks or not? Does a cloth mask do any good or is this just the latest edition of “woke” theatrics? How fast should businesses reopen? What about churches? Should they reopen and under what circumstances? What sort of lessons have we learned to this point? Dave sits down with one of Ricochet’s favorite physicians, known affectionately as Doc Jay to talk about all this and more.

Then, Dave gets Ricochet Member “Arahant” on the phone for a rollicking and fun conversation between two professed curmudgeons. The result is equal parts laughter, commiseration, and compelling insights into life at Ricochet.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Second Look at Sweden’s Response to COVID-19

 

It’s not too late to learn from Sweden‘s management of the COVID-19 pandemic. As the first phase winds down and the results can be tallied, it is clear that Sweden is in an enviable position both economically and medically.

Rather than relying on speculative models to justify draconian policies, Sweden’s public health officials noted the lack of evidence that social isolation mandates could reduce COVID-19 deaths over the full course of the virus. Plainly put, you can change the timing of the damage but you can’t make the virus go away.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. We need shut-down metrics next time, not just open up metrics

 

I get that when the current situation was getting underway we had little information to go on, so most people in government panicked at the thought of hospitals getting overwhelmed. We had to “flatten the curve” so they shut down just about everything, everywhere. Now they’re slowly opening things back up in stages based on metrics such as declining hospitalizations for 14 straight days.

But now we know more, and it turns out that running out of hospital beds didn’t happen. It was a concern only in the New York City area and maybe a couple of other places, for a little while. If anything, hospitals are empty because of stopping most other treatments. Maybe all the shutdowns helped, but we don’t actually know that. Some places didn’t shut down and did ok.

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The past week ended, and the new week started with birds singing and more sightings of beauty and beast-mode. Thursday, May 14, 2020, Maria Bartiromo got an extended interview with President Trump on the White House grounds. She asked 44 questions in a 55 minute interview and got answers to every question, from coronavirus to […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Heads Explode on Command: POTUS Takes HCQ

 

Trump thumbs upWell, the week certainly started off with a bang. President Trump held two televised meetings, one with the new White House Opportunity and Revitalization Council and the other with restaurant industry leaders. In the second forum, he took “questions” from the usual suspects, who naturally asked about everything except restaurant workers and all the workers in the supply chains that are harmed by governments ordering restaurants to go out of business or go far deeper in debt. The honking gaggle gave President Trump a chance to reveal something I had suspected ever since Vice President Pence visited a hospital, on camera, without wearing a mask. President Trump, and likely Vice President Pence, are taking hydroxychloroquine as preventive medicine.*

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Les McKeown is the Founder and CEO of Predictable Success and a trusted advisor to fast-growth SMEs and thriving not-for-profits as well as Fortune 500 companies and some of the largest government agencies in the world. Having been involved in the launch of more than 40 companies before he was 35, he joins Carol Roth to talk about why the COVID-19 crisis is different than any other he has seen for businesses and what they should do. Les and Carol also discuss the impact of coronavirus and government action (and inaction) on the economy.

Plus, a “Now You Know” segment on St. Patrick’s Day.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Covid-19 Update from Whiskey Rebellion Country

 

Well, the local distilleries are doing a booming business. Stopped out at one of my favorites the other day, and picked up a bottle of their “peated bourbon” (as good as any Islay single-malt scotch, IMHO), and had a chat with my friend Ellen, the proprietor. They’re doing great. Selling out, in fact.

I didn’t stop at my other favorite place (perhaps I’ll do that later this week). That one is run by Ed the US Marine, who’s a delightful guy. They make an excellent rye, and experiment with other spirits that take less time to develop. Don’t try the cherry cordial. Tastes like cough syrup. (It’s OK. I gave Ed the Marine my considered opinion on that, because it’s not my style to say something behind a person’s back that I wouldn’t say to his face. He says I’m not alone in that opinion. The other cordials are lovely. And the limoncello is nice.)

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In this episode, Host Joe Selvaggi is joined by Pioneer Research Analyst Rebecca Paxton to get reactions to Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker’s phased reopening, from the leaders of two statewide business organizations, NFIB and Retailers Association of Massachusetts. The guests share their concerns and disappointment with Gov. Baker’s plan, contending that good policy requires us to trust business leaders to protect the needs and safety of their clientele.

Guests:

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Decentralize the COVID-19 Response

 

Two tectonic forces are wreaking havoc on the American economy. On one side of the ledger, retail sales in April plummeted by 16.4% and manufacturing by 13.7%. Simultaneously, unemployment claims rose by about 20 million and have swelled to 36.5 million people overall, a number still climbing. On the other side of the ledger, state governments are grasping for solutions, making erratic decisions about how to restart the economy while reducing the spread of COVID-19.

The difficulties faced by states are compounded by a deep public divide over whether the economy should be reopened now, given the risk of a spike in new cases. The early reopening in Georgia is instructive because individual businesses have generally taken care to make the transition in sensible steps. The same seems to be true in Colorado. In Wisconsin, meanwhile, a Republican legislature backed by a conservative Supreme Court overturned a stay-at-home order imposed by Democratic Governor Tony Evers.

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