One Hundred years after the Treaty of Versailles ended World War I, Victor Davis Hanson argues that the effects of the agreement are widely misunderstood. In this episode, we look at Versailles in the context of the wider war (and the wartime diplomacy of the era), examine the American role in World War I, parse the claim that the First World War was little more than a tragic mistake, and scrutinize claims that modern geopolitical tensions have parallels to those of 1914.

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  1. Arahant Member

    Human nature: Unchanged and unchanging.

    • #1
    • September 3, 2019, at 6:14 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  2. Texmoor Coolidge

    Thank you to VDH for standing up to WW1 revisionist history.

    • #2
    • September 4, 2019, at 7:18 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  3. colleenb Member
    colleenb Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I continue to think that the 1870 Franco-Prussian War was more important than we understand. I would love a recommendation by Professor Hanson on a book (not too detailed) if indeed one has been written. I think its too easy to just dismiss WWI as a bloodbath/stupid/warmongering, etc. That, interestingly, fits the Communist narrative. As someone mentioned about the Nazi-Soviet Pact, the only war everyone likes is WWII because we were allies of the Soviet Union.

    • #3
    • September 4, 2019, at 11:33 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  4. Texmoor Coolidge

    colleenb (View Comment):

    I continue to think that the 1870 Franco-Prussian War was more important than we understand. I would love a recommendation by Professor Hanson on a book (not too detailed) if indeed one has been written. I think its too easy to just dismiss WWI as a bloodbath/stupid/warmongering, etc. That, interestingly, fits the Communist narrative. As someone mentioned about the Nazi-Soviet Pact, the only war everyone likes is WWII because we were allies of the Soviet Union.

    I just started this book on WW1: The First World War: A Complete History by Martin Gilbert

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07H18BPHC/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_muaCDb4FRC0CB

    The Guns of August is great. I blew threw it and almost chose to re-read it recently instead but decided to give Martin Gilbert a try.

    • #4
    • September 4, 2019, at 11:48 AM PDT
    • Like
  5. colleenb Member
    colleenb Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Yes @texmoor I liked Guns of August too. As part of my trying to read more about WWI during the centenary, I also read 1913, Beauty & Sorrow: An Intimate History of WWI, August 1914 (by Solzinetsyn), A Higher Form of Killing (about the airwar), and Paris 1919. 

    • #5
    • September 4, 2019, at 12:09 PM PDT
    • Like
  6. MISTER BITCOIN Member

    the audio quality was bad on itunes

     

    • #6
    • September 5, 2019, at 3:24 PM PDT
    • Like
  7. RufusRJones Member

    I am so glad I heard that.

    • #7
    • September 7, 2019, at 6:59 AM PDT
    • Like
  8. Rodin Member

    Very interesting commentary on Germany in the 21st Century and its antipathy for the US.

    • #8
    • September 7, 2019, at 7:07 PM PDT
    • Like