A few days late because of the holiday week, “Lucretia,” Power Line’s international woman of mystery, joins Steve Hayward once again to resume their series critiquing the “1619 Project,” this time taking up the examples of Alexander Stephens, Booker T. Washington, and W.E. B DuBois, among other thinkers, as well as noting the peculiar objections to the 1619 Project coming from . . . the World Socialists?!? This is going to take a while to unravel. We also have a few topical rants at the beginning about the truly important subjects—chicken sandwiches, cheeseburgers, milkshakes, and french fries.

Exit bumper music this week is Louis Armstrong’s rendition of “Go Down, Moses,” which rather fits the theme of this series.

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There are 3 comments.

  1. Eugene Kriegsmann Member

    The opening discussion about Salvation Army reminded me of the opening chapter of William Manchester’s Goodbye Darkness. During the closing days of WWI Manchester’s father was seriously wounded, nearly killed. He was taken to a hospital where he was initially triaged to the hopeless ward. When he unexpectedly began to recover the Red Cross volunteers went around the hospital selling cigarettes to the wounded veterans. Manchester’s father was not only terribly wounded, but broke. It was the Salvation Army that came around and offered comfort to him without expecting any kind of compensation. Manchester said that he would never, ever contribute to the Red Cross, but never passed a Salvation Army bucket without putting in a contribution. I do the same. 

    • #1
    • December 4, 2019, at 9:03 AM PST
    • 2 likes
  2. colleenb Member
    colleenb Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Eugene Kriegsmann (View Comment):

    The opening discussion about Salvation Army reminded me of the opening chapter of William Manchester’s Goodbye Darkness. During the closing days of WWI Manchester’s father was seriously wounded, nearly killed. He was taken to a hospital where he was initially triaged to the hopeless ward. When he unexpectedly began to recover the Red Cross volunteers went around the hospital selling cigarettes to the wounded veterans. Manchester’s father was not only terribly wounded, but broke. It was the Salvation Army that came around and offered comfort to him without expecting any kind of compensation. Manchester said that he would never, ever contribute to the Red Cross, but never passed a Salvation Army bucket without putting in a contribution. I do the same.

    Wonderful story.

    • #2
    • December 4, 2019, at 12:22 PM PST
    • Like
  3. colleenb Member
    colleenb Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Excellent discussion between Mr. Hayward and my favorite (only?) PLIWofM Lucretia. I am reading Bordewich’s America’s Great Debate and it certainly adds to my knowledge of the argument and attitudes about slavery in America. It truly is a wonder that slavery was ever stamped out by any people with all the advantages that it offers to the slaveholders. I just wish the people who are so worried about the legacy of past slavery would be half as concerned with current human trafficking/slavery.

    • #3
    • December 4, 2019, at 12:35 PM PST
    • 1 like