We’re delighted to bring Scott Yenor to the show this week to discuss his important new book, The Recovery of Family Life: Exposing the Limits of Modern Ideologies, which is being officially released tomorrow from Baylor University Press. Unlike many other fine books on the family today that rely chiefly on social science, Scott also brings his immense learning in political philosophy to bear on family questions, from Plato and Aristotle through to de Tocqueville—and even Russian novels.

Yenor takes us through a grand tour of the “rolling revolution” wrought by the ideologies of sexual liberation and unlimited individual autonomy over recent decades, which has led to, among other things, the degradation of love, and a civilization-threatening collapse in the birth rate. Scott has some thoughts on what policy makers can do to reinforce strong family life.

Journalist Megyn Kelly joins Ben Domenech to discuss her new podcast “The Megyn Kelly Show,” cultural wokeness, and the importance of independent media. Note: This podcast was recorded before President Donald Trump officially nominated Amy Coney Barrett to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat on the Supreme Court of The United States

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. ACF Masters #11: Hail the Conquering Hero

 

Welcome to wartime comedy! Zena Hitz and I bring you the two small-town 4f blues movies Preston Sturges made–first the Marine revolution in Oak Grove, CA, or how democracy comes to a quaint old place. This is an Eddie Bracken comedy, the most hangdog comedian after Buster Keaton, and so even when he gets the parade, the girl, his mother’s happy, whole town loves him, and he’s about to be acclaimed mayor, he’s still miserable. It’s as funny as Hollywood ever got. Enjoy! It’s also the one time Sturges wrote songs, and they’re quite funny, too.

“Judge of the Decade”, the Honorable Michael Warren (6th Circuit Court, Oakland County, MI) Author & Co-Creator of the Patriot Week Foundation https://www.patriotweek.org/ discusses the contentious and history-making Trump nomination to the Supreme Court of the United States. From a Constitutional perspective, can Democrats go through with their threats to “pack the court”? How and when did SCOTUS become so politicized? If Trump wins reelection, will a second term see a 7-2 Conservative court and how would that impact the country?

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Editor-In-Chief of the Hollywood In Toto website Christian Toto joins Host Ben Domenech to discuss the absence of Hollywood entertainment during the pandemic and it’s slow creep back to life. They also examine the hypocrisy of Hollywood’s diversity and political agendas.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Matthew Yglesias, author of “One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger” and co-founder of Vox, joins Host Ben Domenech to discuss how the United States can maintain and preserve its streak of American exceptionalism through common sense solutions like: supporting families, building more housing, more transportation, fixing welfare and welcoming immigrants.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, former Trump National Security Advisor, joins Host Ben Domenech for a conversation about his new book, “Battlegrounds: The Fight to Defend the Free World.” McMaster details his time in the White House and some of the policy initiatives made concerning China, Russia, and other countries. He argues historians will call some of the Trump Administration’s decisions “the greatest shift in foreign policy since the Cold War.”

We are joined by Dr. Jung Chang, author of the best-selling books Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China; Mao: The Unknown Story; and Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister: Three Women at the Heart of Twentieth-Century China. Dr. Chang discusses Wild Swans, a sweeping narrative about three generations of her family across 20th-century China, and the importance of transmitting firsthand historical knowledge of life under Mao Zedong. She also describes her definitive biography of Mao – which, like Wild Swans, remains banned in China – documenting the carnage under his reign, including the peacetime deaths of an estimated 70 million people. She explores Mao’s cult of personality, changing perceptions of his character and legacy, and Maoism’s resurgence in China today. Dr. Chang then delves into the topic of her newest book, Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister: Three Women at the Heart of Twentieth-Century China, a group biography of the powerful Soong sisters, including Madame Chiang. She concludes with a reading from her memoir, Wild Swans.

Stories of the Week: A new report covered by Time magazine reveals a shocking lack of Holocaust knowledge among Millennials and Gen-Z Americans surveyed across 50 states – troubling evidence of the dangers of woefully inadequate history instruction. CBS News reports that more Black families, when given the option, are likely to choose remote learning, for a variety of reasons having to do with mistrust of the system and safety concerns.

Ilya Shapiro is a senior fellow in constitutional studies at the Cato Institute, and author of the timely new book, “Supreme Disorder: Judicial Nominations and the Politics of America’s Highest Court.” With host Ben Domenech, Shapiro explains the history of contentious court fights and how they transitioned from an insulted political conflict into the public square. They also discuss Trump’s potential nominees and how a new justice may cause specific areas of law to undergo a significant shift.

Join host Joe Selvaggi as he discusses Ranked Choice Voting with former Federal Election Commissioner Lee Goodman. As a recognized national expert in election administration, Commissioner Goodman offers a deep dive on the contours of ranked choice voting, including the benefits and challenges moving to the new system would offer Massachusetts voters.

Guest:
Lee Goodman served as Chairman and Commissioner of the Federal Election Commission (FEC), where he successfully led the rulemaking to conform the agency’s regulations to the Supreme Court’s Citizens United and McCutcheon decisions and championed free speech on the Internet and free press rights. He previously had served as legal counsel and policy advisor to the Governor of Virginia and Attorney General of Virginia, and associate general counsel of the University of Virginia.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Assistant Editor Kylee Zempel joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss the passing of Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, President Trump’s decision to nominate a woman justice as her replacement, and the media and left’s handling of the difficult confirmation battle that lies ahead.

Ep. 257 – This week’s episode feature Dave’s interviews at The Real Side Radio; Movie Critic Christian Toto, purveyor at HollywoodInToto.com discusses the controversial Netflix film “Cuties”, Sam Elliott, Burt Reynolds, and the Oscars. At @22:43 Jon Gabriel, Editor in Chief at Ricochet.com discusses the “Harris-Biden Administration” and why Arizona may be big trouble for both President Trump and Senator Martha McSally. At @42:22 Billboard’s Top 40 pop recording artist Ricky Rebel discusses his viral video MAGA (YMCA parody played in full at the end of the interview), and his thoughts on the Lefts’ identity politics.

Independent Institute research fellow and professor emeritus of economics in College of Business at the University of Nevada, Reno, Thomas Cargill, joins Host Ben Domenech to discuss the lack of educational materials covering the progressive movement’s history, particularly how the movement advocated eugenics and forced sterilization in order to attain a better society.

This week’s episode takes us into New York City for a look at two especially incisive ads that could only have come from the Big Apple. We also look at President Trump’s standing with white working-class voters and his general election prospects with the Economist’s D.C. Bureau Chief, James Astill. Listen today!

Acting Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security Ken Cuccinelli joins Host Ben Domenech to discuss federal initiatives of “law and order” in cities like Portland, his history in politics and law enforcement, and the Donald Trump’s leadership during COVID-19 and rioting. 

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the Abraham Accords and hope President Trump is right that several other Arab nations may soon normalize relations with Israel as well. They also discuss the claims of a possible Chinese whistleblower who claims she has evidence that COVID-19 came from a lab rather than a wet market and the Chinese Communist Party has been covering its tracks ever since. Jim explains why she ought to release whatever she has as soon as possible. And as the “experts” keep insisting states are totally prepared for massive mail-in voting, they groan as Michigan can’t even get the names in the presidential race right on the ballot.

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich joins Host Ben Domenech to discuss the 2o20 election season, President Trump’s political strategy, the media, and the future of America and American politics. “This is one of the great transition periods,” Gingrich explained. “I think the most important thing to recognize is that this is a historic rather than a political period.”

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Kelly Smith, founder and CEO of Prenda, a company that helps create flexible learning environments known as microschools. Often described as the “reinvention of the one-room school house,” microschools combine homeschooling, online education, smaller class sizes, mixed age-level groupings, flipped classrooms, and personalized learning. Kelly shares what inspired him to launch Prenda in 2018, and how the COVID-19 pandemic has catapulted microschools to fame. They discuss how Prenda ensures teacher preparation in core academic areas, holds teachers accountable for student outcomes, and works to bridge achievement gaps.

Stories of the Week: A new report from Eric Hanushek and Ludger Woessmann projects that school closures could cost the U.S. economy over $14.2 trillion by the end of the century. Idaho Gov. Brad Little announced $150 million in funding to public schools and parents for COVID-19 relief, including direct payments to families for educational materials, devices, and services. In The Atlantic, scholars discuss the pros and cons of families’ increasing propensity to consider alternatives to public schools, as a result of COVID.

Join Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer Institute’s executive director Jim Stergios for a conversation with Boston Globe columnist Jeff Jacoby about the lawsuit against the Massachusetts Governor’s executive orders. They will explore what can be learned from the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic, and what must be considered when devising a new way forward.

Related commentary:
The Boston Globe (Columnist Jeff Jacoby): “Baker’s pandemic orders were tough. Were they lawful?
Commonwealth magazine (Pioneer Executive Director Jim Stergios and MA State Senator Ryan Fattman): “Executive branch overreach, blanket orders having harmful effects

Director of the Office of Management and Budget Russell Vought joins Host Ben Domenech to discuss how his office responded to the discovery of the recent critical race theory curriculum being used by federal agencies. He also explained how the OMB dealt with economic uncertainty during COVID-19 and what fiscal responsibility looks like under the Trump administration.