Your questions were so good that Jim and Greg decided to take on three more today! In this edition, they address why supposed conservatives not only refused to support Donald Trump but stopped advocating for conservatism and openly embraced the Democrats while insisting they are still the principled ones. Then they discuss who they would choose as their running mates, with the condition that they cannot choose each other. Finally, they talk “Die Hard” – you knew it was going to come up! This time they are asked to rank the films in the series from best to worst.

We love our listeners and we love hearing from you! So we decided to ask what questions you’d like us to address.  Today we start with a great hypothetical. If conservatives won control of the House, Senate, and White House (with a supermajority in the Senate), which president from the past 100 years would we want setting the agenda and what would we want him to focus on. Then they take on a question asking what margin Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis needs to win re-election by to have real momentum for a 2024 presidential bad – and how damaging would it be for him if Sen. Marco Rubio wins by a wider margin?  Finally, they tackle a Terminator-themed political question in a crazy but intriguing final martini.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Josh Smith, research manager at The Center for Growth and Opportunity at Utah State University, about his work to demonstrate the outsized impact immigrants have on the economy and our culture. Josh describes some of the the negative narratives and the “othering” of immigrants, even though they’re part of our communities. Despite repeated fears that each new migrant group would never assimilate, America remains a “nation of immigrants,” and this is its not-so-secret sauce – as you’ll learn in this week’s JobMakers.

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. Charles Hobson, a retired resident scholar at the William & Mary Law School, 26-year editor of The Papers of John Marshall, and author of The Great Chief Justice: John Marshall and the Rule of Law. Dr. Hobson shares what students should know about the longest-serving, most important chief justice in the history of the Supreme Court, and his influence on our understanding of the U.S. Constitution. He reviews some of the most important Court decisions in American history. He also describes Marshall’s relationship with President Thomas Jefferson and their divergent views on the authority of the Court; as well as Marshall’s paradoxical position on African-American slavery. They explore the “Marshall Trilogy” of foundational Court decisions about Native Americans; and Chief Justice Marshall’s role and legacy of using the Court to safeguard the rule of law under the Constitution.

Stories of the Week: In Arizona, 40 students enrolled in the Applied Career Exploration in STEM (ACES) Camp engaged in immersive, hands-on activities and explored a wide variety of STEM careers. All 50 U.S. governors have agreed to expand K-12 computer science education in their states, prompted by a letter from 500+ business, education and nonprofit leaders urging an update.

Join Jim and Greg as they continue their week of special podcasts. Today, they take a grim look back at August 2021 and the disgraceful, chaotic, and deadly U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan. They walk through the Biden administration’s missteps before, during, and after the Taliban took control of Kabul. They also recognize the heroism of U.S. veterans who refused to leave their Afghan friends to the brutality of the Taliban and worked feverishly to get them out of the country. And they examine the ways that America’s perceived weakness around the world has impacted events throughout the world.

Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with Dr. Bill Smith, Director of Pioneer Institute’s Life Sciences Initiative, about the impact of the Inflation Reduction Act on long-term health costs. They discuss the bill’s unintended consequences, potential effect on the region’s vibrant pharmaceutical research and development sector, and what citizens can do about it.

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In this episode of Take Back Our Schools, Beth and Andrew welcome back former math teacher, journalist and educational hero, Paul Rossi. Paul discusses his seven week purgatory from Twitter for exposing videos of toxic racial literacy curriculum that has infiltrated private schools across the country. Paul also talks about his recent expose of his former school, Grace Church, where a drag queen was invited to perform in bi-weekly chapel, and students were pressured to dance along. We also discuss how identity politics in schools has shifted from race to gender and sexual orientation, and Paul shares his own experiences as a teacher witnessing this transition. 

Paul Rossi is a mathematics teacher, writer, and whistleblower who disclosed the impact of CRT at Grace Church School, where he taught from 2012 to 2021. He is currently a Senior Education Analyst writing for LegalInsurrection.com, and an advisor to the Educational Liberty Alliance.

Jim and Greg are both on vacation but they put together a full week of brand new content for you. Today, they preview Jim’s soon-to-be-released novel, “Gathering Five Storms.” It’s the third installment in his “Dangerous Clique” series. Today, Jim offers a refresher on the premise for the series and what readers can expect in this latest novel. He also has a related e-book short story entitled “Saving the Devil” so you can get a flavor for the novel for just 99 cents. Finally, they discuss how real world events and ideas greatly influence the plot in his novels.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Khamzat Asabaev, refugee from Chechnya and cofounder of SoftSmile, a software tool that helps dentists provide affordable, quality orthodontic treatment. Khamzat pursued entrepreneurship to make basic services accessible to all, after experiencing a lack of access to basic care as a refugee and a minority. Refugees like Khamzat face terrible circumstances, but through resilience and fortitude, often make significant contributions to their adopted homeland, with higher rates of employment and entrepreneurship. That means they give back far more than we gave them, as you’ll discover in this week’s JobMakers.

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Join Jim and Greg as they breathe a big sigh of relief that Eric Schmitt will be the GOP nominee for U.S. Senate in Missouri – and also that Eric Greitens won’t be. They also wince as the pro-life side takes a drubbing in Kansas but aren’t convinced there’s been a sea change in the midterms. And they try to sort out America’s paradoxical “One China Policy.”

 

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Milly Arbaje-Thomas, President & CEO of the Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity, Inc. (METCO) and Roger Hatch, co-author of Pioneer’s report, METCO Funding: Understanding Massachusetts’ Voluntary School Desegregation Program. Milly shares her background as an immigrant from the Dominican Republic and deep involvement with anti-poverty and neighborhood-based organizations in Boston. She describes METCO’s history, the challenges METCO participants face, and the program’s proven track record of achieving excellent results for minority students from Boston and Springfield. The discussion turns to METCO’s complex funding model, and Roger Hatch summarizes the main findings of his recent report. They explore institutional barriers to expansion, despite the program’s contribution to diversifying greater Boston’s suburban districts (METCO students constitute very high percentages of those districts’ minority student population). They talk about the fiscal implications of METCO in suburban districts, including state and district funding and transportation costs; and possible financial reforms.

Stories of the Week: Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg applauds President Biden’s reversal of a proposal to curb charter school expansion. Basketball legend and civil rights trailblazer Bill Russell passed away this week; Cara and Gerard pay tribute to him.

Kim Holmes is a veteran foreign-policy hand. For many years, he was at the Heritage Foundation. He was also an assistant secretary of state. Today, he is, among other things, vice chairman of the Center for International Private Enterprise. With Jay, he talks about the War on Terror (ongoing). And, of course, the Ukraine war. And China and Taiwan. He also talks about American conservatism: Are leaders and institutions on the right still devoted to liberty? No matter what, Kim Holmes is, and listeners of all types will be interested and/or provoked by what he has to say. 

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the CIA drone killing of Al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri in Afghanistan and recount the horrors he helped to inflict over the years. But they also wonder just how much Al Qaeda has reconstituted in Afghanistan. They also note the signs of a fraying relationship between the U.S. and Ukraine and whether the Biden administration is looking to end the war while Zelensky refuses. And they shake their heads as Trump endorses “ERIC” in the Missouri Senate race, since Eric Greitens is a scandal-ridden cancer on the GOP who could easily lose the general election and Eric Schmitt is a strong conservative who would win easily in November.

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with Boston Globe columnist Jeff Jacoby about November’s Massachusetts Ballot Question 1, the so-called Fair Share Amendment. They examine both the merits and timing of a graduated state income tax, as well as the effects on society of creating separate categories of tax payers, and the dangers of setting the many against the few.

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Join Jim and Greg as they serve up three very bitter martinis. First, it’s a double shot of bad as Sen. Joe Manchin abandons his inflation concerns to push corporate tax increases and hundreds of billions in climate change programs – and it’s all going to happen because the GOP got outsmarted by Senate Dems. They also fume as the Biden administration offers to free one of the world’s worst terrorists in exchange for two Americans held in Russia. And they lament a new Gallup poll showing that just 29 percent of Americans think couples with children should be married. And the numbers aren’t that much better among conservatives.

 

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with April Ryan, immigrant from Russia, founder and CEO of Red Iguana nail art products, and influencer to hundreds of thousands. April came to the U.S. from a poor town, speaking no English, but through tenacity and inventiveness, she achieved success by creating video tutorials of nail art, and developing a breakthrough product that became a bestseller in 19 countries. April’s story is the immigrant story, about the kind of people who embark on the journey to America, and then put their pluck and ingenuity to use for the benefit of everybody, as you’ll hear in this week’s JobMakers podcast.

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Photo courtesy Charles Love

On this free-flowing episode of Take Back Our Schools, Beth and Andrew speak with author, activist and social commentator, Charles Love. We speak about Charles’s involvement in the recent, “Open Letter Denouncing the Attacks on Justice Clarence Thomas.” Charles shares his views on why black progressives are silent on the racist attacks against Justice Thomas, and what Republicans need to do to engage with the black community and encourage them to join the culture war. Charles also shares his own personal experiences engaging with his young son’s school on issues of racial indoctrination in the classroom.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Gerard Robinson and Cara Candal talk with Richard Epstein, the inaugural Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Law at NYU School of Law, and author of The Classical Liberal Constitution: The Uncertain Quest for Limited Government. He describes the influence of 17th and 18th-century English ideas on our Founding Fathers’ views of ordered liberty and self-government. He traces federalism’s legal roots and explains why the concept of “competitive federalism” among the states and with the national government remains hotly contested. They discuss federalism as it relates to education, with early state constitutions delegating wide authority to local governments and citizens. Professor Epstein distinguishes federalism from infamous states’ rights arguments from antebellum America, or unjust state and local laws like Jim Crowism and segregation, and offers insights on how to strike a balance between the federal, state, and local governments in terms of ensuring basic rights. He explores how policymakers at all levels should think about using classical liberal constitutionalism to achieve wider access to educational excellence. The interview concludes with Professor Epstein’s reading from his book.

Stories of the Week: In the UK, the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Entrepreneurship has issued a report calling on the government to prioritize instruction in entrepreneurial skills. In Utah, women constitute 72 percent of K-12 educators, but only 13 percent of school superintendents, according to 2019 study by the national School Superintendents Association.

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with Rafael Mangual, Manhattan Institute senior fellow, about his newly released book, Criminal (In)Justice, examining where crime is occurring in the U.S., what types of crimes those in the prison systems have committed, and the tradeoffs faced by society when considering defunding the police and reducing prison populations.

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With the Ukraine war dragging on, joining this episode is Stephen Bryen, an expert on Ukraine, war fighting, security, and technology. We explore the state of play, how that war might end, and some technology lessons including warfighters using Elon Musk’s Starlink, and about Russia’s weaponized energy exports.

Musk’s Tech Put to Deadly Weapon Effect in Ukraine, Stephen Bryen, Asia Times, July 1, 2022