Paul Beston joins Steven Malanga to talk about the history of the American high school and making high-quality career training central in today’s high schools. This Ten Blocks episode is the second based on City Journal’s special issue, The Shape of Work to Come.

In 1910, less than 20 percent of America’s 15-to-18-year-olds were enrolled in high school. By 1940, that figure had reached nearly 75 percent. The phenomenon became known as the American high school movement, and the impetus for it came from local communities, not from federal, or even state, government.

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Mattress Girl Discredited

 

If you haven’t heard of the “mattress girl,” it’s not for lack of trying among liberal opinion shapers. Emma Sulkowicz, who dragged a blue mattress around Columbia University’s campus in 2014 to dramatize her plight as a rape victim, was profiled sympathetically in New York magazine, the New York Times and other publications. Senator Kirstin Gillibrand (D., NY) invited her to attend one of President Obama’s State of the Union speeches. Artnet pronounced her mattress stunt (for which Columbia awarded her course credit as an art project) “one of the most important art works of the year,” and she was honored by the Feminist Majority Foundation and other groups.

Her story is this: A consensual sexual encounter with a male student named Paul Nungesser suddenly turned violent. Without warning, he choked her, struck her, and anally penetrated her while she cried out in pain.

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Education Spending and Results: An Idaho Story

 

So does spending more per student improve outcomes in Idaho? In a word, no.

I have a graduate-level background in statistics. I was asked by a local conservative think tank to see whether increased spending on secondary education on Idaho has a meaningful effect on student outcomes. Idaho periodically administers its own ISAT achievement tests to elementary and secondary students. The 10th grade science test from 2014 was the latest set of results that I could obtain with a broad sampling of students with the longest exposure to public schooling. Public schools in Idaho also submit their annual budgetary information on a standardized set of accounts, 2013 was the latest available. I extracted the operating portion of districts’ budgets (educational and overhead expenses) and scaled that by the average daily attendance (ADA) in each district, showing how much was being spent per student.

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The Mindset and the Frame

 

Both @susanquinn and @henryracette have written responses to my last post, one more favorable than the other. After reading these and many of the comments, I would like to clarify my intentions and proposed strategy.

First, I do not advocate merely some enraged, scorched earth, wild, and unfocused assault on “the enemy”. I emphatically propose that we fight, but we need to do so intelligently. Indeed, we should “choose our battles”, only proactively choosing to actually battle from time to time instead of perpetually using “choose your battles” to rationalize postponing the battle for another day that never comes.

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Jim Geraghty of the National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud Claremont McKenna College in California for defending free speech rights and punishing students who attempted to prevent a guest from speaking on campus. Reports claim that President Donald Trump has asked for specifics on his powers to pardon aides, family members, and even himself, leading Jim to ask when the president will stop making life more difficult for himself and allow the investigation to run its course. They call into question the genuinenss of OJ Simpson’s contrition after he was granted parole on Thursday and Jim makes a bold prediction about OJ’s future.

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Washington Examiner columnist Salena Zito welcomes Dr. Laura Brown, Director at George Washington University Graduate School of Political Management to the show. Much like Salena, Dr. Brown has an obsessive passion for history and politics. With this joint passion, the two discuss how the 2016 election and current administration has affected the younger generation in pursuing education and careers in politics.

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Harvard’s Assault on Freedom of Association

 

Whether you follow the work of my organization, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) or not, you may be aware of the ongoing dispute over Harvard University’s single-gender social organizations (e.g., the “Final Clubs”), which the university has been trying to drive to extinction through increasingly unsubtle means.

Last May, Harvard announced that members of these social organizations would be ineligible for recommendation for prestigious scholarships, chief among them the Rhodes and Marshall scholarships, and also be ineligible for leadership positions in student organizations. It’s been a dark comedy of errors ever since. Perhaps sensing the backlash to come from the recommendations of the policy’s implementation committee, which recommended making the policy even harsher, Harvard College Dean Rakesh Khurana announced the formation of a new review committee in January 2017. But Khurana then turned right around and said he would accept “nearly all” of the implementation committee’s draconian recommendations, and then appointed himself the head of the new review committee.

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Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for July 5, 2017 it’s the “Podcast of Record” edition of the podcast with your hosts Mike Stopa and Todd Feinburg. On this celebratory weekend of America’s birthday we bring you two stories from the Grey Lady herself, the New York Times, (who says it’s all fake news???) describing (1) how liberals are segregating America and (2) how they are attempting to invoke sympathy for Central Americans who are forced to cancel their well laid plans for trekking with human smugglers across the desert, children in tow, to enter America illegally.

First, the august NYT describes the current state of the “Fair Housing Act” (from 1968) and how these days what it is doing is offering tax exempt funding for low income housing that builders can only find already impoverished communities to build in (Program to Spur Low-Income Housing is Keeping Cities Segregated).The result: more segregation. Who could have imagined such a well-intentioned government program having consequences that, well, nobody thought of???

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Bill discusses Pres. Trump’s big win before the Supreme Court after it upholds most of his travel ban. Bill also weighs in on the latest news regarding Republican efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare. Then, foreign policy expert Michael Del Rosso joins Bill to discuss the war against ISIS abroad in Mosul and Syria as well as at home in the fight against the spread of radical Islam. Finally, he talks with David French about the legal and political implications of the Supreme Court upholding the travel ban and what comes next for Trump’s immigration plan.

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Today on the Daily Standard podcast, Preston Cooper of the American Enterprise Institute joins host Eric Felten to find out why, whether good times or bad, the price of college tuition keeps going up.

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In this AEI Events Podcast, AEI’s Gerard Robinson hosts Senate Committee on the Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA), who addresses the bipartisan Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2015 he cosponsored with Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) and several other lawmakers. This aims to cut mandatory minimums, grant judges greater sentencing discretion, and help prisoners successfully return to society.

Following Chairman Grassley’s remarks, Hayne Yoon (Vera Institute), John Huffington (Living Classroom Foundation), and the Pat Nolan (American Conservative Union Center for Criminal Justice Reform) discuss how to prepare prisoners for life after prison, reduce recidivism, provide opportunities for returned citizens, and reform the criminal justice system to create safer communities and more stable families. The panelists also address improving prison conditions for women, introducing prosecutorial discretion in sentencing, and funding and operating correctional education programs.

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In this AEI Events Podcast, AEI’s Nat Malkus welcomes Elizabeth McGhee Hassrick, Stephen Raudenbush, and Lisa Rosen, the authors of “The Ambitious Elementary School: Its Conception, Design, and Implications for Educational Equality,” to AEI to discuss school design, personalized instruction, and educational equality.

The authors open the event by describing their theory of school reform and its implementation at the University of Chicago Charter School. Their efforts have reduced racial inequality and improved reading ability among elementary school students. In short, the authors advocate for increased collaboration among teachers, administrators, and parents and for systemic approaches to school turnarounds.

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