Your questions were so good that Jim and Greg decided to take on three more today! In this edition, they address why supposed conservatives not only refused to support Donald Trump but stopped advocating for conservatism and openly embraced the Democrats while insisting they are still the principled ones. Then they discuss who they would choose as their running mates, with the condition that they cannot choose each other. Finally, they talk “Die Hard” – you knew it was going to come up! This time they are asked to rank the films in the series from best to worst.

We love our listeners and we love hearing from you! So we decided to ask what questions you’d like us to address.  Today we start with a great hypothetical. If conservatives won control of the House, Senate, and White House (with a supermajority in the Senate), which president from the past 100 years would we want setting the agenda and what would we want him to focus on. Then they take on a question asking what margin Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis needs to win re-election by to have real momentum for a 2024 presidential bad – and how damaging would it be for him if Sen. Marco Rubio wins by a wider margin?  Finally, they tackle a Terminator-themed political question in a crazy but intriguing final martini.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Josh Smith, research manager at The Center for Growth and Opportunity at Utah State University, about his work to demonstrate the outsized impact immigrants have on the economy and our culture. Josh describes some of the the negative narratives and the “othering” of immigrants, even though they’re part of our communities. Despite repeated fears that each new migrant group would never assimilate, America remains a “nation of immigrants,” and this is its not-so-secret sauce – as you’ll learn in this week’s JobMakers.

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. Charles Hobson, a retired resident scholar at the William & Mary Law School, 26-year editor of The Papers of John Marshall, and author of The Great Chief Justice: John Marshall and the Rule of Law. Dr. Hobson shares what students should know about the longest-serving, most important chief justice in the history of the Supreme Court, and his influence on our understanding of the U.S. Constitution. He reviews some of the most important Court decisions in American history. He also describes Marshall’s relationship with President Thomas Jefferson and their divergent views on the authority of the Court; as well as Marshall’s paradoxical position on African-American slavery. They explore the “Marshall Trilogy” of foundational Court decisions about Native Americans; and Chief Justice Marshall’s role and legacy of using the Court to safeguard the rule of law under the Constitution.

Stories of the Week: In Arizona, 40 students enrolled in the Applied Career Exploration in STEM (ACES) Camp engaged in immersive, hands-on activities and explored a wide variety of STEM careers. All 50 U.S. governors have agreed to expand K-12 computer science education in their states, prompted by a letter from 500+ business, education and nonprofit leaders urging an update.

Jim and Greg continue their week of special podcasts by focusing on the critical 2022 midterm elections.  They start by looking at the most competitive U.S. Senate races and come to different conclusions about which party is likely to be in control of the Senate next year. They also look at the race for the House, which is likely to swing back to GOP control, but is it a lock and how big of a GOP majority is reasonable to expect?  Finally, they examine the highest profile governor races, which may produce presidential contenders before too long.

Join Jim and Greg as they continue their week of special podcasts. Today, they take a grim look back at August 2021 and the disgraceful, chaotic, and deadly U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan. They walk through the Biden administration’s missteps before, during, and after the Taliban took control of Kabul. They also recognize the heroism of U.S. veterans who refused to leave their Afghan friends to the brutality of the Taliban and worked feverishly to get them out of the country. And they examine the ways that America’s perceived weakness around the world has impacted events throughout the world.

Jim and Greg are both on vacation but they put together a full week of brand new content for you. Today, they preview Jim’s soon-to-be-released novel, “Gathering Five Storms.” It’s the third installment in his “Dangerous Clique” series. Today, Jim offers a refresher on the premise for the series and what readers can expect in this latest novel. He also has a related e-book short story entitled “Saving the Devil” so you can get a flavor for the novel for just 99 cents. Finally, they discuss how real world events and ideas greatly influence the plot in his novels.

Join Jim and Greg as they dig into reports that plummeting demand – and not President Biden – are responsible for falling gas prices. They also sigh as businesses of all sizes are making plans to flee Taiwan if the China invades. And they get a kick out of New York Rep. Carolyn Maloney saying she didn’t expect President Biden to run again in 2024 and then gushing over him with praise when she apologizes.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they breathe a big sigh of relief that Eric Schmitt will be the GOP nominee for U.S. Senate in Missouri – and also that Eric Greitens won’t be. They also wince as the pro-life side takes a drubbing in Kansas but aren’t convinced there’s been a sea change in the midterms. And they try to sort out America’s paradoxical “One China Policy.”

 

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Milly Arbaje-Thomas, President & CEO of the Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity, Inc. (METCO) and Roger Hatch, co-author of Pioneer’s report, METCO Funding: Understanding Massachusetts’ Voluntary School Desegregation Program. Milly shares her background as an immigrant from the Dominican Republic and deep involvement with anti-poverty and neighborhood-based organizations in Boston. She describes METCO’s history, the challenges METCO participants face, and the program’s proven track record of achieving excellent results for minority students from Boston and Springfield. The discussion turns to METCO’s complex funding model, and Roger Hatch summarizes the main findings of his recent report. They explore institutional barriers to expansion, despite the program’s contribution to diversifying greater Boston’s suburban districts (METCO students constitute very high percentages of those districts’ minority student population). They talk about the fiscal implications of METCO in suburban districts, including state and district funding and transportation costs; and possible financial reforms.

Stories of the Week: Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg applauds President Biden’s reversal of a proposal to curb charter school expansion. Basketball legend and civil rights trailblazer Bill Russell passed away this week; Cara and Gerard pay tribute to him.

Modern social and political discussions all seem to revolve around the concept of identity. Dr. Carl Trueman, theologian and former William E. Simon Fellow in Religion and Public Life here at the Madison Program, discusses how thinkers like Marx, Freud, and Nietzsche created a world in which sexuality is politicized, and in which we all instinctively know what it means to “identify as.”

Dr. Trueman is the author two recent books, The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self, and a shorter, study-version on the same topic, Strange New World.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the CIA drone killing of Al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri in Afghanistan and recount the horrors he helped to inflict over the years. But they also wonder just how much Al Qaeda has reconstituted in Afghanistan. They also note the signs of a fraying relationship between the U.S. and Ukraine and whether the Biden administration is looking to end the war while Zelensky refuses. And they shake their heads as Trump endorses “ERIC” in the Missouri Senate race, since Eric Greitens is a scandal-ridden cancer on the GOP who could easily lose the general election and Eric Schmitt is a strong conservative who would win easily in November.

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with Boston Globe columnist Jeff Jacoby about November’s Massachusetts Ballot Question 1, the so-called Fair Share Amendment. They examine both the merits and timing of a graduated state income tax, as well as the effects on society of creating separate categories of tax payers, and the dangers of setting the many against the few.

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That would be Charles E. Magoon, appointed governor of the Isthmian Canal Commission in 1905 by President Roosevelt. He sure sounded qualified! And oh for the days when this was the sort of person you might meet in Washington, D.C. But before I get into any of that, I would like to report that the […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they wade into the rare territory of giving credit to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for planning to visit Taiwan in the face of Chinese threats against her. Sadly, President Biden has once again displayed his default position of weakness on this issue as well. They also rip Paul Krugman for trying to claim that the economy is actually really strong and that people think their own financial situation is fine but the media keeps convincing everyone things are bad. And they dissect the six-game suspension for Cleveland Browns quarterback Deshaun Watson after two dozen women accused him of sexual harassment or worse but no criminal charges were filed.

 

A Journalist and a Spy

 

Katherine Clark was an investigative reporter active between the 1940s and 1960s. She was the first female Allied war correspondent entering Berlin in 1945. Her 1950s beat was Eastern Europe. There she spoke truth to power, what investigative reporters are supposed to do. But she spoke the wrong kind of truth about the wrong kind of power. So, unlike those widely lionized today, like I.F. Stone, Clark has been allowed to be forgotten. Until now.

“The Double Life of Katharine Clark: The Untold Story of the American Journalist Who Brought the Truth about Communism to the West,” by Katharine Gregorio, brings Clark’s biography to the attention of a new generation of Americans. What a story it is.

Gregorio focuses the story on Clark’s Eastern European years, when Clark covered anti-Soviet uprisings in Poland, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia. More importantly, it reveals her efforts on behalf of Milovan Djilas, one-time vice-president of Yugoslavia. An ardent Communist who became disaffected with Communism, he was stripped of his position and the privileges and power that went with it after speaking up against its totalitarianism.

Join Jim and Greg as they find a glimmer of hope in Sen. Sinema’s silence thus far on the Manchin-Schumer bill. They also wince as another reports high inflation is here for at least several more months. And they shake their heads as Dr. Oz is polling at just 36 percent in Pennsylvania and is badly trailing an opponent who hasn’t campaigned in more than two months.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they serve up three very bitter martinis. First, it’s a double shot of bad as Sen. Joe Manchin abandons his inflation concerns to push corporate tax increases and hundreds of billions in climate change programs – and it’s all going to happen because the GOP got outsmarted by Senate Dems. They also fume as the Biden administration offers to free one of the world’s worst terrorists in exchange for two Americans held in Russia. And they lament a new Gallup poll showing that just 29 percent of Americans think couples with children should be married. And the numbers aren’t that much better among conservatives.