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Iconic Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Sir Winston Churchill was a former officer in the British Army and is considered by many to be one of the greatest wartime leaders of the 20th century. He oversaw British victory in the Second World War, played an important role in defending against the spread of fascism, […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the news that a top figure in Iran’s likely nuclear weapons program was targeted and killed and they marvel at how it was done. They also bang their heads against the table as some Trump supporters suggest opposing GOP senators David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler for being insufficiently vocal about the alleged election fraud and believe writing in Trump in the Senate races would send a powerful message. And they groan as the media clearly intends to stay in full Joe Biden cheerleading mode, including one story featuring an animal psychic who says Biden’s dogs are convinced he will be a great president.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Robinson’s Rescues

 

This is about a World War II Navy Chaplain, Charles Robinson, who helped free the first Allied POWs in Japan. I’m posting this on Ricochet partly because I was irritated by the recently discovered comments by the Democrat candidate Raphael Warnock in the Georgia special election for Senate, who orated from the pulpit that people cannot serve the military and God. I didn’t find this to be true during my Navy career, whether one was serving as a Chaplain or just an adherent of a religion. Some of the people I respected the most were men of the cloth and I still value their friendship and the time we served together.

The essay is unrelated to the politics of the moment, so if you’d like a break from news about the election, the essay is safe to read. I doubt any of you have heard about Father Robinson, but his story is one that is worthy of sharing and, I believe, undercuts the narrative that Reverend Warnock peddles. Father Robinson pursued studies in theology that led him to become a Jesuit Priest almost 100 years ago, and he went overseas to Japan for his first posting. What he learned while in Japan ended up helping hundreds of prisoners of war in the Tokyo area who had been tortured or were starving at the end of the war.

The full essay is based on a research project for a history class I completed earlier this year. The professor described how Father Robinson had accomplished a mission of mercy for the Jesuits at the Jesuit Sophia University in Tokyo, and due to my Navy background, she suggested I research it for the term paper. My research determined that he had done a lot more of consequence before his rescue mission to Sophia. At the war’s end, he was stationed onboard the Battleship USS Missouri (BB-63), which arrived at the entrance to Tokyo Bay a few days before it would host the surrender ceremony on 2 September 1945. Of the tens of thousands of sailors who came to Tokyo Bay and were present for the surrender ceremony, Father Robinson had a skill that ended up being critical for rescuing hundreds of prisoners of war (POW) languishing in Japan’s numerous POW camps. He used his knowledge and abilities with distinction, in ways that helped smooth the process of quickly freeing the first group of POWs and saving other lives.

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From what was then called The Teaching Company I once bought a course about constitutional law, and it was so bizarre I returned it for a full refund, which provision may or may not be in the U.S. Constitution. The course probably was getting around to saying so, because everything is in the U.S. Constitution, […]

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We hope you and your family had a wonderful Thanksgiving! As Black Friday officially kicks off the Christmas shopping season, Jim and Greg each discuss three gifts they’d like to give political figures. The gifts range from the practical to the comical to the desperately needed.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. I Was Dead and Buried: A Soldier Visits His Own Grave at Shiloh

 

Post-war photo of William C. Phipps (The Indianapolis News, May 28, 1912)
There are many oddball stories associated with the American Civil War, and this is one of them; it concerns a soldier from Indiana who visited his own grave at Shiloh. The story was told in The Hocking Sentinel (Logan, Ohio), June 4, 1903:

William C. Phipps, of Indianapolis, accompanied the Governor’s party to Shiloh. April 4, for the dedication of the Indiana monuments, for the purpose of seeing whether he was still dead. He desired to view his resting place again. I was especially anxious to see this old battlefield,’ said Mr. Phipps, ‘for there I fought, bled and died in my youth.

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The Covid crisis has unleashed the petty tyrants, little by little, bit by bit. “MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) – The state of Vermont is again encouraging people to limit Thanksgiving gatherings this week to members of their immediate households. Preview Open

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Join Jim and Greg as they reveal what they’re politically thankful for in 2020. From the fight against COVID to domestic politics to major events on the world stage, they each find three things they’re thankful for from this difficult, unpredictable year.

Happy Thanksgiving to all 3 Martini Lunch listeners and your families! There will be no podcast on Thursday. Please join us Friday for our special Black Friday edition, as Jim and Greg pick out gifts for various political figures.

There may be no good martinis today but we’re still having a lot of fun! Join Jim and Greg as they groan over Biden’s choice of John Kerry to be a special envoy on climate change and Biden making the progressive climate agenda a major priority. They also tear apart the push for compulsory voting in the U.S. and why not caring about politics should remain one of our cherished rights. And they unload on Pennsylvania for implementing an arbitrary ban on alcohol sales in bars and restaurants on Wednesday.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The 57th Anniversary of the Assassination of President Kennedy

 

I was in third grade when President Kennedy was murdered. They let us out of school early but didn’t tell us why. I walked home with my sister Joan, who was in fifth grade. My mom was watching the TV and told us what happened. I now have an apartment just over a mile from Dealey Plaza where it happened. We walked there yesterday and took pictures.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome disputed reports that the leaders of Saudi Arabia and Israel met in recent days in hopes that the thaw in Middle East tensions is spreading even farther. As the CEO of Qantas Airlines announces all passengers on international flights will eventually need to be vaccinated against COVID to be allowed on board, Jim and Greg discuss why that’s a difficult policy to enforce and whether people will shut out from society if they refuse. And they discuss the Trump legal team parting ways with Sidney Powell just days after their much-discussed press conference.

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This review may be a bit premature, considering I’m only halfway through the podcast, but it’s already too good to not share! I had two semi-long car rides over the past weekend, so I decided to try out this audio documentary that had been sitting in my feed for months. I did not regret it! […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome growing evidence that coronavirus transmission rates are very low in the schools. Jim explains why the Trump campaign’s accusations of massive election fraud don’t seem to hold water. And they shake their heads as Barack Obama reveals why his Middle East peace efforts went nowhere.

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss Senate Democrats unloading on Minority Leader Chuck Schumer over Democrats failing to win several highly targeted seats this year. Is his job safe? They also unload on Joe Biden’s plan to tax gun owners $34 billion and ban some of the most popular rifles and magazines on the market. And they dissect New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo melting down over COVID, schools, and law enforcement officers refusing to endorse his absurd policy on Thanksgiving gatherings.

Join Jim and Greg as they credit Republicans for keeping a treasure trove of opposition research on Raphael Warnock quiet until the Georgia Senate runoff. Now they are highlighting Warnock’s radical statements on many different issues. They also walk through a number of burdensome new COVID restrictions, including Pennsylvania’s requirement to wear masks in your own home if you have guests, and contrast that with politicians like California Gov. Gavin Newsom who don’t think the rules apply to them. And they get a kick out of watching Bernie Sanders supporters become deeply disappointed with Joe Biden as he names corporate figures to most positions in his inner circle.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Wayne Franklin, professor of English at the University of Connecticut and definitive biographer of the American literary figure James Fenimore Cooper. As we celebrate Native American Heritage Month, Prof. Franklin reviews Cooper’s background and major works, especially the “Leatherstocking Tales,” including The Last of the Mohicans, which are distinguished for their enlightened and sympathetic portrayal of the disappearing tribes. Franklin discusses why these books, set in upstate New York in the middle of the 18th century, and their memorable protagonists have captivated generations of readers for over a century, and why Cooper deserves more contemporary study and appreciation. They also explore Cooper’s lessons about the importance of constitutionalism, liberty, self-government, and civic knowledge as the basis for the rule of law in our republic. Prof. Franklin concludes with a reading from The Last of the Mohicans.

Stories of the Week: In Europe, despite a COVID-19 surge that has prompted closures of restaurants, theaters, and gyms, schools remain open. Are there lessons for the U.S.? Some prominent names have been floated to serve as the next U.S. Secretary of Education – among them, Eduardo Padron, president emeritus of Miami Dade College; Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers; and Lily Eskelsen García, former president of the National Education Association – but would they accept?

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer four sheriffs in New York for refusing to investigate whether local residents have more than ten people in their homes for Thanksgiving. They also push back against the push by Democrats to forgive vast amounts of student loan debt and discuss the backlash that would ensue. And they discuss Jim’s new thriller “Hunting Four Horsemen” and how it ties into the threat we’ve all been dealing with this year.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the news that Moderna’s new coronavirus vaccine is nearly 95 percent effective. They also look at the Georgia runoffs, hos history is on the GOP’s side, and how the opposition research on Rev. Warnock is now flowing freely. And they react to Georgia Democrats assuming Stacey Abrams will run for governor again in 2022.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Pioneering Allied Airborne Operations Recounted

 

The Germans were the first nation to airborne troops in combat, using them decisively in 1939 and 1940. The British were not far behind, developing their own airborne forces in 1940. They initially used their airborne troops as raiders.

“Churchill’s Shadow Raiders: The Race to Develop Radar, WWII’s Invisible Secret Weapon,” by Damien Lewis examines the first two combat operations by British paratroopers, Operations Colossus and Biting. It combines these stories with a look at the “Wizard War” – the battle between Britain and Germany for electronics superiority.

Colossus and Biting were intended to smash vital targets unapproachable to soldiers, except by air. Operation Colossus was a February 1941 landing by paratroopers to destroy an aqueduct delivering water to Southern Italy. Operation Biting, in February 1942, was supposed to appear to be a British attempt to destroy a German radar station. In reality, it was to carry off the radar for intelligence analysis.

Join Jim and Greg as they relish Democrats likely having such a tight majority in the House that it will be tough for many to accept jobs in the executive branch because the vacancies could make it tough for Democrats to get much legislation done. They also hammer musician John Legend for suggesting you’ll do more good donating to Democrats running for U.S. Senate in Georgia than giving to your local food bank. And they update the infighting among Democrats by discussing the latest salvos from Joe Manchin and AOC.