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Click here to listen to the podcast On this episode of The Resistance Library Podcast, Sam and Dave discuss the Star-Spangled Banner. It might be impossible to sing, but everyone knows the words to the national anthem of the United States – “The Star-Spangled Banner.” It’s a staple at everything from sporting events to patriotic […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the partnership among the U.S., the United Kingdom, and Australia that will allow Australia to have nuclear submarines and hopefully pose a deterrent to China in the region.  They’re also glad to see special counsel John Durham is still alive and planning to indict a lawyer in connection with the 2016 effort to allege collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign.  And we fume at the FBI once again as Olympic gymnasts explain how the bureau completely dropped the ball on investigating team doctor and serial molester Larry Nassar.

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We continue our small reading group of Solzhenitsyn’s The Gulag Archipelago, vol. 1, to help us understand what is happening today. You can read the original post: The Gulag Archipelago, V. 1: Ch. 1&2. For the next two weeks (Sept. 16-30), we continue with Chapter 5, “First Cell, First Love,” and Chapter 6, “That Spring.” […]

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O Columbia! the gem of the ocean,The home of the brave and the free,The shrine of each patriot’s devotion,A world offers homage to thee;Thy mandates make heroes assemble,When Liberty’s form stands in view;Thy banners make tyranny tremble,When borne by the red, white, and blue.   Preview Open

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Jim and Greg are fascinated to see public opinion catching up with the troubling performance of President Biden, especially among independents and women. They also groan as California voters overwhelmingly vote to keep Gov. Gavin Newsom and Democrats are likely to see the results as proof of support for their radical agenda. And they hammer away at Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley following reports he told Chinese officials he would tip them off if President Trump ordered an attack against them.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” guest co-host Jason Bedrick and co-host Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. Leon Kass, MD, the Addie Clark Harding Professor Emeritus in the Committee on Social Thought and the College at the University of Chicago. Dr. Kass describes the important pieces of wisdom and humanity people today can still learn from reading the Book of Genesis, the topic of his 2003 work, The Beginning of Wisdom. They next discuss his newest book, Founding God’s Nation: Reading Exodus, and general lessons about the Israelites that leaders, teachers, and students could use in addressing the challenges of modern life. They explore the influence of the Book of Exodus and the themes of liberation from captivity on the Civil Rights Movement, and several of its major leaders, including the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and what teachers and students today should learn from Exodus about deliverance from life’s hardships. Dr. Kass shares why he became interested in the Great Books, and their crucial role in helping 21st-century students receive a complete liberal arts education and lead fulfilling lives. They discuss Western education’s increasing focus on vocationally oriented and often technocratic skills at the expense of humanistic education, and why we should be concerned about it, especially in our hyper-technological era. The interview concludes with a reading from Dr. Kass’s newest book on Exodus.

Stories of the Week: Co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson discuss New York Times story on the plight of America’s nine million students in rural school districts that are underfunded, disconnected, and face myriad challenges. Pioneer Institute and other organizations submitted an amicus brief in the U.S. Supreme Court case, Carson v. Makin, to expand access to private and religious schools for families in Maine.

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It might be impossible to sing, but everyone knows the words to the national anthem of the United States – “The Star-Spangled Banner.” It’s a staple at everything from sporting events to patriotic rallies. But while everyone knows the song, very few Americans know the story behind it, both the story of the lyrics and […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they react to Chinese state media open talking about flying jets over Taiwan, solidifying sovereignty, and warning other nations not to recognize Taiwan. They also groan as Secretary of State Antony Blinken keeps talking about his expectations that the Taliban will allow freedom of travel and right for women and girls – even though they aren’t doing those things and never will. And they react to Larry Elder’s website and a statement from President Trump alleging fraud in the results of today’s California recall.

Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with author and former MassPort CEO Virginia Buckingham about her recently released book, On My Watch: A Memoir, which chronicles her experience leading the organization through 9/11 and the life and leadership lessons learned from that tragic day.

Guest:
A native New Englander, Virginia Buckingham was the first woman to serve as chief of staff to two consecutive Massachusetts governors. She was subsequently appointed to head the Massachusetts Port Authority, operator of Logan International Airport. She has also worked as a deputy editorial page editor and columnist for the Boston Herald. In 2015 she was selected for the inaugural class of Presidential Leadership Scholars. She is a graduate of Boston College.

The Oklahoma Panhandle: Creating and Settling No Man’s Land

 

I grew up in the small town of Optima, OK, which had 92 people, in the heart of No Man’s Land, the Oklahoma Panhandle. I’ve become curious how my home region became No Man’s Land, so I did some research. It turned out to be a story of how a series of unrelated decisions by the federal government, foreign governments, and American politicians affected a largely unsettled portion of North America and accidentally formed the land in which I grew up. Here is the story of each of the four borders of the rectangular Oklahoma Panhandle.

Source: http://www.emersonkent.com/images/us_expansion_1820_adams_onis.jpg

Join Jim and Greg as they chronicle how the U.S. likely killed a U.S. ally instead of ISIS-K personnel in the drone strike following the terrorist attack at the Kabul airport.  And this news comes as the State Department stops processing special immigrant visa applications for our Afghan allies.  They also hammer the Democrats for proposing $3 trillion in higher taxes to pay for their bloated, reconciliation bill full of terrible policies.  And they sigh as more Democrats see Trump supporters and unvaccinated people as bigger threats than the Taliban or China.

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On this episode of The Resistance Library Podcast, Sam and Dave discuss the 9/11 attacks, Al-Qaeda, and the domestic fall-out from America’s secret war. With American military personnel now entering service who were not even alive on 9/11, this seems an appropriate time to reexamine the events of September 11, 2001 – the opaque motives […]

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With American military personnel now entering service who were not even alive on 9/11, this seems an appropriate time to reexamine the events of September 11, 2001 – the opaque motives for the attacks, the equally opaque motives for the counter-offensive by the United States and its allies known as the Global War on Terror, and […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they slam President Biden’s heavy-handed and logically inconsistent bullying act on COVID policy…and they discuss why he’s really doing this. They also hammer Democrats and their allies in the media for the despicable, racist coverage of California gubernatorial candidate Larry Elder. And they offer their reflections in advance of Saturday’s 20th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

Join Jim and Greg as Jim sizes up Pres. Biden’s latest COVID strategy as “same as the old one only louder.” They also shudder at the weakness the U.S. is projecting around the world, most recently through the painfully pathetic statements of Defense Sec. Lloyd Austin and Sec. of State Antony Blinken. And they hammer Biden for refusing to relax his European travel ban.

Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with Jeffrey Thielman, President and CEO of the International Institute of New England, about the path refugees must take to resettle in the US, how organizations like his facilitate and integrate refugees including those recently displaced in Afghanistan, and what individuals concerned about the fate of refugees can do to support their resettlement.

Guest:

Join Jim and Greg as they applaud conservative and mainstream media for calling out Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer over his lie that all Americans who wanted to get out of Afghanistan are now out. In a double-fisted bad martini, they hammer the State Department for greatly hindering the efforts of private groups to get Americans and our Afghan allies out of the country.  They also revisit the Obama administration’s terrible swap of five high-value Taliban figures for American deserter Bowe Bergdahl – and the impact it is having right now. And they marvel at the large number of online leftists who honestly think they can get Brett Kavanaugh removed from the U.S. Supreme Court.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Dr. Kate Clifford Larson, a New York Times best-selling biographer of Harriet Tubman and Fannie Lou Hamer. Kate shares why she has written about these historical African-American figures, and how she thinks parents, teachers, and schools can draw on their lives to talk about race. She describes the deeply segregated Jim Crow landscape of Fannie Lou Hamer’s native Mississippi Delta, the challenges she faced, and the influence of Freedom Songs and spirituals like “This Little Light of Mine,” often performed at her rallies, on her tireless advocacy. They discuss Hamer’s courageous voter mobilization efforts during Freedom Summer and at the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, both during the summer of 1964, and why it’s so important for Americans to know about this unsung heroine of the Civil Rights era. They also explore Hamer’s reception by President Lyndon Johnson and the often male-centric Civil Rights Movement.

Stories of the Week: Around the country, K-12 online learning is experiencing a decline in interest among families, especially in programs with less live instruction and interaction with teachers and peers. A report from the National Student Clearinghouse shows that just over 40 percent of 2- and 4-year college students across the U.S. during the 2020-21 academic year were men.

Join Jim and Greg as they’re pleasantly staggered to see Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal publicly slamming the federal government for not doing more to get American citizens and our Afghan allies out of Afghanistan. They also dig into recently divulged documents showing labs in China were doing experiments with SARS-related cornavirus on mice with human cells and we paid for it. And they unload on the Biden administration for its ongoing lies about Americans and Afghan allies being allowed to leave.

Was the Doolittle Raid a Mistake?

 

Recent events have me thinking about military strategy, and the importance of morale. I found myself mulling over the famous Doolittle raid during World War II.

For those who might not recall the details, this was an air raid on Tokyo in April 1942 by a handful of American bombers, B-25 Mitchells, which were land-based bombers but were, in this instance, launched off the carrier Hornet. The damage to Tokyo was minimal, but the propaganda victory was significant, after a series of catastrophic American and allied losses in the first months of the war.