Join Jim and Greg as they applaud Australia for ending its extradition agreement with Hong Kong and extending visas for Hong Kong residents in Australia over China’s crackdown on freedoms. They also discuss New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman urging Joe Biden to refuse debating President Trump unless Trump agrees to a couple of very unlikely demands. And they wince as CNN’s Don Lemon demonstrates just how little he knows about the most basic tenets of belief for tens of millions of Americans.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Well, this is interesting. Especially if you live in eastern Oklahoma, including the state’s second largest city, Tulsa. While much of the media will focus on the two US Supreme Court decisions involving whether 1) Congress or 2) Manhattan prosecutors may access President Trump’s tax returns, I find the McGirt v. Oklahoma State Appeals Court […]

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After a week off, the crew is back and have an in-depth conversation about:

  • Trump’s Mt. Rushmore speech and the media’s awful portrayal of it
  • Sen. Tammy Duckworth’s characterization of the speech is a total lie
  • Cancel culture and the goofy claim it doesn’t exist and what the future holds

There is no magazine this week, so the guys will talk about their top picks in the next issue!

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Join Jim and Greg for three crazy martinis today! First, they wade into the battle over how schools should open, with President Trump and teacher unions unsurprisingly on opposite sides of the debate. Jim offers a highly entertaining theory on how a recent head injury may explain some of his troubling decisions. And they have a lot of fun dissecting the new presidential campaign of Kanye West.

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Join Jim and Greg as they wince over the news that coronavirus mutations could make the virus up to ten times more contagious. They also hammer Joe Biden for embracing a national version of California’s AB5, which crushes opportunities for freelance work and erodes the right to work without joining labor unions. And they shake their heads as President Trump decides to dredge up a fight with Bubba Wallace and NASCAR.

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Member Post

 

It has become a common refrain to hear that “this is the most important election in our lifetime.” So common, in fact that it has become a common refrain to hear that “It has become a common refrain to hear that ‘this is the most important election in our lifetime.’” The implied message is that […]

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Greg and Jim are both here! Today, they welcome a Supreme Court decision extolling the importance of honoring the verdict of the people in each state during presidential elections. They also shudder as China reports at least one case of the bubonic plague. And they have fun with the NBA allowing “personalized” messages on players’ jerseys that must come from a pre-approved list of messages.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The United States in a Perilous Year

 

The United States is going through some hard times right now. Some might believe 2020 to be the most challenging year faced by the Republic. The oldest among us remember a year far worse than 2020 or even the 1960s.

“The Year of Peril: America in 1942,” by Tracy Campbell, recalls that year. The United States had been unexpectedly thrust into a war, one we appeared to be losing in 1942.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Today in American History

 

On this day in history — July 4, 1881 — Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, known today as Tuskegee University, in Tuskegee, Alabama, held its first day of class.

Booker T. Washington served as the school’s founding principal and presided over the first day of class– which, due to significant lack of resources, was held in a one-room church. The first official building on campus was erected by Washington and the students themselves, one year later.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: The Declaration of Independence

 

IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776.

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,

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On Independence Day, when so much seems to be going wrong, perhaps we need to take a step back, share a laugh, and then focus some attention on those whose dedication makes this and every Independence Day possible. This episode meets both of those needs as Dave sits down with comedian David Deeble to bring the blood pressure down a bit by looking at the lighter side of life. Everything is fair game, from rioters toppling garden gnomes, to the proper placement of deer crossing signs in this freewheeling and fun exchange.

Then, Dave talks with new Ricochet Member Nick Plosser, who has started his own podcast called The Half Percent. The podcast provides a needed outlet and opportunity for active duty military, veterans, guard and reserve troops to tell their story, share their experiences, and bring you into the world of that half percent of Americans who are serving their country in uniform at any given time. Nick is an inspiring gentleman, and has even persuaded Dave to be a guest on an upcoming episode of his podcast (we understand there will be humor and bourbon involved, though we’re not sure which comes first). If you’re looking for reasons to celebrate Independence Day, this episode will do the trick.

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Gordon Wood, Alva O. Way University Professor and Professor of History Emeritus at Brown University and author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, The Radicalism of the American Revolution. Professor Wood shares his wisdom about the many ways in which the Revolution marked a new beginning for humanity, reversing the centuries-old, top-down understanding of government and society. They begin with the efforts of Founders such as Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Rush to institute universal public education to nurture the well-educated and enlightened citizenry that they viewed as the backbone of the Republic. They discuss why George Washington’s “disinterest” in political rewards for military victory was so unique and extraordinary among his international contemporaries. Professor Wood also explains how the American Revolution gave rise to the first anti-slave movements in world history, and how actions taken to abolish slavery led to its eventual demise as a result of the Civil War. They also delve into the lives of the Revolutionary era’s often less well-known female figures, including Abigail Adams, Mercy Otis Warren, Judith Sargent Murray, and the inspirational freed slave poet, Phillis Wheatley. Professor Wood concludes with observations on Aaron Burr, popularized through “Hamilton,” the phenomenally successful musical, and the character traits and actions that have cast Burr as one of American history’s most notorious Founding era figures. The Learning Curve team would like to wish everyone a Happy Fourth of July!

Stories of the Week: A Good Morning America feature story highlights how African-American history will likely see greater traction across the nation’s classrooms, thanks to teachers’ efforts to move beyond outdated textbooks and create their own culturally-sensitive learning materials. The supervisory group for the Nation’s Report Card announced this week that it is cancelling national assessments of U.S. history or civics in 2021 for eighth graders. Is this decision reflective of a legitimate concern about spreading COVID, or merely a concession to the country’s growing anti-testing movement?

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Your Friday martinis are served as Rob Long fills in for Jim. Today, they applaud Tim Scott for pointing out the Democrats didn’t block police reform because of what was in the bill but because of who was proposing it. They also wade into the scrutiny on some red states as their COVID infections increase, and they dissect the intense political debate over wearing masks. And they have fun with the news $1.4 billion in stimulus checks were sent out to dead people.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. President and First Lady Honor Korean War Fallen

 

The Korean War began 70 years ago, June 25, 1950. The coldest war in the Cold War never ended, settling into ceasefires and an armistice that never led to a peace treaty. This June 25, President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump went to the Korean War Memorial.

They laid a wreath, Taps was played, then they greeted the South Korean ambassador and his wife, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, and a small group of Korean War veterans. While there were no handshakes, and distance was maintained in this outdoor setting, no one was covering their face and the old warriors sat and stood shoulder-to-shoulder.

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Rob Long is in for Jim again Thursday. Today, Rob and Greg applaud Seattle businesses for suing the city for failing to provide essential services while local politicians coddled the radicals in the CHAZ/CHOP area. They also react to revelations in Peter Strzok’s notes that Barack Obama and Joe Biden were in on the planning to target Michael Flynn and the Trump administration. And they unload on leftist radicals and their enablers as what supposedly started as an effort to rein in police brutality is now focused on tearing down a statue celebrating emancipation, destroying Mount Rushmore, and changing our national anthem.

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Seth had the day off today so it was just Jay, Grant, and Park. In the first part of the show, the guys were joined by attorney Kyle Sammin to discuss his latest piece in the magazine called, Solving the social media standoff. Kyle goes into some possible solutions that don’t go as far as eliminating Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act but perhaps adding a new category specifically related to big social media companies such as Twitter and Facebook.

Also discussed is the renewed fight over statues and how people warned several years ago it would go beyond Confederate figures and begin to target figures such as Thomas Jefferson and George Washington.

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Rob Long is in for Jim Geraghty again. He and Greg rip into far left activist Shaun King for wanting all “European” depictions of Jesus torn down and discuss that the real target of many on the far left is not just religious artwork but the church itself. They also weigh in on why many police are doing nothing to stop the vandalism and destruction of statues and monuments and they address the political debate arising on the right about whether the police ought to clamp down and protect these properties or whether images of endless rioting are going to lead to more votes for Republicans in November. And they have fun with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who did nothing about rioting but is now on the warpath against illegal fireworks dealers.

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Rob Long is in for Jim again today and he and Greg are tackling three crazy martinis. First, they wade into the fight over the Theodore Roosevelt statue outside New York City’s Museum of Natural History, and Rob offers a deal to those who want to tear it down. They also discuss the drama surrounding the supposed resignation of U.S. Attorney Geoffery Berman, who then said he had not resigned and would not leave, only to be fired the next day. And they weigh in on Brett Favre likening Colin Kaepernick to Pat Tillman because both gave up NFL careers for the causes they believed in.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A New Look at a Global Conflict

 

The French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars was the world’s first truly global conflict. Although the Seven Years’ War and Wars of American Independence were fought globally, the round of fighting triggered by the French Revolution saw major campaigns on a wider geographic scale than seen previously or since. No war, including World War II saw major fighting in as many different continents.

“The Napoleonic Wars: A Global History,” by Alexander Mikaberidze examines the conflict from a global perspective.

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