Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud former ABC News anchor Ted Koppel’s critique of the media and appreciate that at least one veteran journalist has the courage to speak out on liberal bias in the news. They also take President Trump to task for attacking the late Sen. John McCain in a series of immature tweets and public statements. And they predict former Vice President Joe Biden won’t endear himself to progressives if reports are true that he’s planning to name former Georgia Rep. Stacey Abrams his running mate in 2020.

More

Please Support Our Sponsor!

Ricochet Member Recommended FeedRecommended by R> Members

‘Compelled to Suffer’: The Story of the Houston Children of Leake County, Mississippi

 
Appeal for aid from the Orphan’s Home at Lauderdale Springs, Mississippi. (Clarion-Ledger, May 9, 1867)

In 1866 the number of children orphaned in Mississippi by the Civil War was estimated to be 10,000. The problem was so acute that the Confederate Orphans Home of Mississippi was established by the Mississippi Baptist State Convention in 1865 at Lauderdale Springs outside of Meridian. In less than two years the facility was home to over 200 orphans, and it remained in

operation until 1878 when the last of its charges had been placed into homes. The great majority of children in Mississippi who had lost their parents never saw the inside of an orphanage, as most were taken in by friends or family.

More

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America blast House Majority Whip James Clyburn after the congressman likens President Trump to Adolf Hitler and says the Trump family is the greatest threat to democracy in his lifetime. They’re also aghast as CNN receives a Cronkite award for their disastrous Parkland Town Hall from 2018. And they wonder what is going on as George Conway, husband of White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway, engages in a very public Twitter spat with President Trump.

 

More

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see New Yorkers souring on Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez despite her glowing media coverage and roll their eyes at her explanation for her dip in popularity. They also question the journalistic integrity at Reuters after reporter Joseph Menn held on to a story about Beto O’Rourke’ being a member of the hacker group “The Cult of the Dead Cow” until after his loss to Texas Sen. Ted Cruz. And they argue that long shot candidates like New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who attracted a measly six supporters to his last event, should quit crowding the field and let more experienced and recognizable candidates fight it out.

More

Please Support Our Sponsor!

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see not all Democrats have lost their minds after Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet begs 2020 candidates not to campaign on expanding the Supreme Court. They also hammer Beto O’Rourke and other liberals for using the New Zealand mosque massacre to push a ban on the AR-15. And they defend Chelsea Clinton after progressives accuse her of facilitating the New Zealand massacre with her critique of Rep. Ilhan Omar. 

More

This Week’s Book Review – The Great Escape from Stalag Luft III: The memoir of Jens Müller

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Wednesdays. When it appears, I post the review here on the following Sunday. More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America recoil at the mass murder of 49 Muslims in New Zealand, the radical manifesto that came with it, and the aggravating tendency of politicians and activists to claim instantly that an attack vindicates their existing political positions. They also slam Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez for mocking the idea of “thoughts and prayers” in the wake of these horrible events and then claiming she really said it to attack the NRA for carnage in New Zealand. And they have fun with Howard Schultz suggesting he would not sign any legislation as president that did not have bipartisan support or nominate any Supreme Court justice who couldn’t get two-thirds support in the Senate.

More

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America argue that Beto O’Rourke running for president is actually a good thing because it will either show media infatuation can get you elected or burst O’Rourke’s hype bubble. They are also concerned by the alarming rise in mental health disorders in teens that is linked to social media use. And they also give Elizabeth Warren a molecule of credit for defending capitalism, only to watch her then say markets don’t work for health care or education.

More

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America welcome a Politico report showing that even if liberals soaked “the rich” they wouldn’t come anywhere close to paying for single-payer health care or the Green New Deal. They also shake their heads as testimony from former FBI attorney Lisa Page suggests the FBI was considering whether to recommend a federal charge against Hillary Clinton over her mishandling of classified emails but the Justice Department made it clear it had no intention of pursuing the case. And Jim offers his hilarious assessment of climate change activists refusing to have children until the world gets serious about climate change.

More

Please Support Our Sponsor!

Ricochet Member Recommended FeedRecommended by R> Members

‘God Knows When the Suffering Will Stop’: The Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1878

 
In the 19th Century “Yellow Jack” was a common nickname for Yellow Fever.

For nearly two centuries, yellow fever was one of the most feared diseases in the new world. Although it sometimes struck the northern part of the United States, it was most common in the tropical and subtropical regions of the southern states. Mississippi suffered through a number of yellow fever epidemics in the 19th century, but the worst was the outbreak in 1878.

The virus that causes yellow fever is carried by a species of mosquito known as Aedes aegypti, but at the time of the 1878 epidemic the cause of the disease was unknown. This species of mosquito is only found near humans, for it prefers to live and breed in shaded containers with solid sides to which it can cement its eggs. In the 19th century, house cisterns were one of the prime locations for Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to breed.

More

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are a bit surprised by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff signaling they don’t plan to pursue impeachment of President Trump unless there’s a bipartisan consensus for it. They also look on sadly as New York City’s exorbitant taxes and hard left policies leave the city careening towards bankruptcy. And they crack a few pop-culture jokes but also weigh in on the serious issues as celebrities and elites around the country are charged with bribing colleges and universities to admit their kids under false pretenses.

More

Please Support Our Sponsor!

Ricochet Member Recommended FeedRecommended by R> Members

A French History and Its Lessons

 

I commend to your attention this article by Jaspreet Singh Boparai, which appeared in the web-zine Quillette on March 10. It looks back on a forgotten episode in modern history, but one that reverberates to this day. “The French Genocide That Has Been Air-Brushed From History” More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Ricochet Member Recommended FeedRecommended by R> Members

34 Years Ago Today: Politburo Selects Gorbachev as Soviet Leader

 

Thirty-four years ago today, the revolving door that had become the entry point to leadership of the Soviet Union stopped when Mikhail Gorbachev was elected General Secretary of the Communist Party. On that day, he became the fourth Soviet leader in under three years (Brezhnev died in November 1982, Andropov in February of 1984, Chernenko on March 10, 1985). There hadn’t been such drama on the world leadership front since, well, the dramatic and unexpected selection of KarolJózef Wojtyła as Pope in 1978, after the 33-day tenure of Albino Luciani.

A little over six-and-a-half years later, on Christmas Day 1991, and severely compromised as the result of a coup a few months earlier, Gorbachev, the last leader of the USSR, resigned and handed over what was left of his power to new Russian President Boris Yeltsin. On December 26, the Soviet Union was officially dissolved and its Republics were handed their self-governance.

More

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America enthusiastically cheer the first two months of Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and point out that good things can happen when a leader hits the ground running on the things they promised to do. They also wince as just six House Democrats agree that illegal immigrants shouldn’t be voting. And they wonder if millennials are really far to the left or whether they embrace labels they don’t quite understand as 73 percent favor the government instituting universal health care but 79 percent want to keep private insurance.

More
Ricochet Member Recommended FeedRecommended by R> Members

A Snowball Fight at Dalton Georgia

 

For Civil War soldiers, the enemy they had to fight most often was boredom, as combat took up only a small portion of their time. Soldiers being soldiers, they found many outlets for their pent up energy. One favorite pastime during the winter was snowball fights. Often these affairs were took on the appearance of an actual battle, with thousands of men and their officers taking part. An account of one such “battle” was written by an unknown member of Stanford’s Mississippi Battery while they were camped near Dalton, Georgia, in March 1864. This narrative was published in the Charleston Mercury on March 31, 1864:

SNOW FIGHTS IN THE ARMY

More

In this second part of our long conversation with Fred Siegel, Steve Hayward walks him through the final decay of New York in the 1980s after four decades of unrelenting liberal governance, how Rudy Giuliani turned it around in the 1990s, and what the prospects are for Mayor de Blasio. (Remember that this interview was originally recorded for video four years ago). From there we have a long conversation about what might be called Fred’s summa, his last book The Revolt Against the Masses: How Liberalism Has Undermined the Middle Class. This show is a grand tour of some of the key moments and thinkers of liberalism in the 20th century, and even though this interview was taped before Trump emerged as a presidential candidate in 2015, Fred is remarkably prescient about the defects of conservatism that Trump perceived and exploited, how liberalism was running headlong into the ruin of identity politics, and how the Obama presidency was unwinding in its final year.

More

Spy Craft Series

 

Here are 3 spy series you and your significant other can immerse yourselves with over a long, cold weekend. Think of it as a cold cold-war weekend. Game, Set and Match, adapted from the books of Len Deighton More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and author and speaker Greg Knapp puzzle over Senator Kirstin Gillibrand’s campaign strategy after she dismissed criticism of her shifting policy positions by accusing Rachel Maddow of MSNBC of using Republican talking-points. They also note the Democrat’s virtual inaction in response to Congresswoman Ilhan Omar’s controversial comments on Israel and ask if this reveals a significant change in the party. And they also determine that Rep. Ayanna Pressley’s plan to lower the legal voting age for federal elections to 16 is a bad idea and would contribute to the ongoing infantilization of America.

More

How Will Creating Lynching Monuments Set Things Right?

 

The Civil War of the United States will never be over, if some groups have their say.

I missed this story last year; its current iteration saddens and frustrates me. It seems that some people want to transform our history, create new villains and victims, design a story that will make some folks hate others more than ever, and pity those who had little power. I don’t think a lynching monument, or several of them, are going to improve this picture.

More