Join Jim and Greg as they discuss even more revelations from the New York nursing home scandal and former Cuomo staffers admitting that working for the governor was like being in a cult. Jim fumes as Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan refuses to accept the Johnson & Johnson vaccines and also because many states and school districts are not keeping track of how many teachers are getting vaccinated. They react to revelations that Barack Obama tried to talk Joe Biden out of running for president in 2020 and they get a kick out of learning the candidate Obama seems to have preferred.

You remember the 19th Amendment, right? It was in all the papers at the time. In this episode, Dave welcomes author Tyler Boyd onto the show to talk about his new book, “Tennessee Statesman Harry T. Boyd,” which tells the story of the gentleman who cast the deciding vote which ratified the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution, giving women across America the right to vote. As it happens, the book’s author is the great grand-nephew of Harry T. Burn, and had extraordinary access to the documents and first-hand accounts of Burn, his life and impact on the state and the nation. As you will hear, Harry T. Burn’s contributions to the nation didn’t stop with the passage of women’s suffrage. Indeed, throughout his time in public life, which included a campaign for Tennessee governor and multiple terms in the Tennessee Senate, Burn’s commitment to limited government and responsible stewardship of the public trust was actually ahead of his time.

Then Dave sits down with a fellow military veteran (and fellow 18 wheeler driver), Ricochet Member Chuck Ceccacci. Chuck and Dave both drove military show trucks and participated together in the 2014 Rolling Thunder event, where they drove their show trucks through Washington DC, along with over 800,000 veterans on motorcycles, to call attention to military members who were held as Prisoners of War and Missing In Action. It’s understood that when a couple of veterans start telling stories, it’s going to be interesting, but who knew it would be so funny too? This is one episode you won’t want to miss

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer on conservative activists trying to sink the nomination of the unqualified and radical HHS nominee, Xavier Becerra. They also roll their eyes as New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo claims he had no idea his actions offended any of the women accusing him of sexual harassment, and are disgusted that the media consider this a bigger story than the nursing home scandal. And they react to the revelation that the FBI gave Capitol Police had a fairly detailed warning of what would happen at the Capitol on January 6 but also told them not to take any actions as a result of it.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer the failure of the Neera Tanden nomination for the Office of Management and Budget. They also welcome strong vaccination numbers in Texas, which makes Gov. Abbott’s decision to open the state 100 percent a pretty safe move. They also welcome the notion of allowing people to make their own decisions. And they cringe as the number of newborns in the U.S. after nine months of the pandemic were disturbingly low.

Join Jim and Greg as they discuss the staggering number of students who fell through the cracks because schools were closed and the impact that could have. They also roll their eyes as Elizabeth Warren and a couple of allies in the House propose a wealth tax, and they discuss why New York Democrats suddenly seem so eager to boot Gov. Cuomo.

 

Join Jim and Greg as they chronicle the second accusation of sexual harassment against New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his ever-changing response to it. They also get a kick out of the possibility that Florida Democrats might dust off Charlie Crist to challenge Gov. Ron DeSantis in 2022. And they fire back at an NBC “explainer” on hate crimes, which suggests reporters need to be very careful about labeling something a hate crime if the offender is not white.

‘Knapsacks Packed and Ready to Move Forward’: The Diary of Christopher Adams, 18th Mississippi Infantry

 

The grave of Christopher Adams in Rose Hill Cemetery, Meridian, Mississippi. (Findagrave.com)
In August 1927, Mrs. Henrietta Adams, age 76, filled out an application with the Lauderdale County Chancery Clerk to obtain a Confederate widow’s pension from the state of Mississippi. Her husband, Christopher Adams, had died in 1907, but his service as a soldier in the Confederate army made her eligible for the benefit.

Widows that sought a pension from the state were required to show proof that their husbands had served in the Civil War, and to meet this requirement, Mrs. Adams brought to the courthouse the diary kept by her spouse during the conflict. The Chancery Clerk looked over the manuscript and made a transcription of the first few pages of its contents, which he included with the pension application.

The Waco Siege: What Happened When the Feds Laid Siege to the Branch Davidian Compound

 

“The record of the Waco incident documents mistakes. What the record from Waco does not evidence, however, is any improper motive or intent on the part of law enforcement.”

The siege of the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas, is an important event in American history because it directly led to one of the biggest terrorist attacks on American soil – the bombing of the Oklahoma City Federal Building. It’s not necessary to defend this act of terrorism to understand why the entire freedom movement of the time was so incensed by it. Indeed, it stood as a symbol of federal overreach and the corruption of the Clinton Administration.

It’s important to separate fact from fiction when it comes to the siege of Waco, just as it is important to do so with the siege of Ruby Ridge or the attack on the American consolate in Benghazi. With every event, it is important to stick to the facts and what can be extrapolated from them to make the strongest argument about what went wrong and why, and what could be done differently in the future.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the Senate parliamentarian ruling that a minimum wage increase may not be included as part of the reconciliation process on a COVID relief bill. Jim updates the lingering problems as vaccines are being administered far slower than they are being produced. And they’re getting nervous as the last Senate Republican who could save the Neera Tanden nomination agrees to a one-on-one meeting with her.

Join Jim and Greg as they enjoy hearing HHS nominee Xavier Becerra squirm as he insists he never sued the Little Sisters of the Poor, just the federal government for giving a contraception mandate exemption to the nuns. They also peel back the sexual harassment allegations against New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and discuss the growing number of Democrats coming out to denounce him. And they hammer Amnesty International for removing its “prisoner of conscience” label for Russian political figure Alexei Navalny over comments Navalny made 15 years ago.

 

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Gerard and Cara talk with Ayaan Hirsi Ali, a Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, founder of the AHA Foundation, and author of the books Prey: Immigration, Islam, and the Erosion of Women’s Rights, Infidel: My Lifeand Nomad: From Islam to America – A Personal Journey Through the Clash of Civilizations. Ms. Hirsi Ali shares insights from her upbringing and early education in Somalia, Saudi Arabia, and Kenya, as well as her courageous immigration to the West, where she experienced an intellectual awakening that led to human rights activism and a seat in the Dutch Parliament. They discuss why all human rights and free speech advocates should be concerned about the rise and growing militancy of political correctness and “cancel culture” in the West, its impact on reasoned public debate, and what educators need to teach young people about the importance of open mindedness and the free exchange of ideas. Lastly, Ms. Hirsi Ali reviews the central theme of her latest book, Prey, which explores the long-term ramifications of mass migration from Islamic-majority countries on the rights of women in Europe, given the different value systems between these countries and the West, with its commitment to the rule of law, rights-centered constitutionalism, science, and religious liberty. She concludes with a reading from the book.

Stories of the Week: The Biden administration is ordering states to continue federally required standardized tests this year, though there is flexibility on the exam format and accountability standards. Is this an opportunity for innovation in student testing? All members of a San Francisco-area school board resigned after mocking parents at a virtual meeting that they didn’t realize was already being broadcast live. Was this an isolated incident or a window into their general outlook toward families?

Jim is back today! Join him and Greg as they welcome FDA approval of the Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine. They also wince as Virginia Republicans announce they will be holding their convention for selecting nominees for governor and other statewide offices in a bunch of Liberty University parking lots. And they have a lot of fun discussing Hillary Clinton’s foray into writing fictional thrillers.

Chad Benson is in for Jim today. Chad and Greg examine new research from the Federal Reserve showing the Biden racial equity agenda would actually make the wealth divide much greater. They also react to a pair of House Dems trying to get cable TV providers to cut ties with Fox News, OANN, and Newsmax. And they shake their heads as Merrick Garland draws a peculiar line between what is domestic terrorism and what is not.

Founding Fathers Quotes on the Limited Executive Powers of the United States Presidency

 

One of the unfortunate rules of power is that those who are least equipped to exercise it judiciously are the most inclined to seek it. The Founding Fathers understood this, which is precisely why the presidency was so limited in its powers. George Washington was seen as an exemplar of what a president should be precisely because he accepted power only reluctantly and was happy to give it up when he felt his time was over. It wasn’t until Franklin Delano Roosevelt was elected four times that anyone thought to term limit the presidency with the Constitution. Only two other men sought a third term: Ulysses S. Grant, who did so half-heartedly and mostly let his followers do the work, and Theodore Roosevelt, who ran for a non-consecutive third term the same way he did everything else – with great vigor and gusto.

The powers of the presidency have expanded greatly since the time of George Washington, making the term “imperial presidency” more than just a throwaway phrase. Executive Orders carry great weight, perhaps even more so than statutes drafted and passed by Congress. The Founders did not foresee such a situation, which is far more akin to the British Crown’s powers than to that of George Washington or any other president bar Abraham Lincoln, who presided over the nation at a time of great crisis.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the news that West Virginia Democrat Joe Manchin is opposing the nomination of Neera Tanden, President Biden’s choice for budget director, and two of the most moderate Republicans are already saying they’re voting against her as well. They also hammer California Democrat Ro Khanna, after the congressman says he doesn’t want small businesses that cannot afford to pay $15 per hour. And they follow the insane evolution of “the experts,” who are now saying that you will need to wear a mask long after the bulk of the population has been vaccinated.

Join Jim and Greg as they dish out two bad martinis and a crazy one. First, they sigh as reports from non-conservative sources say President Biden’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill will actually waste taxpayer dollars and do economic damage. They also cringe as Dr. Fauci suggests a new vaccine needs to be created to ward off the effects of the South African variant of COVID, but Jim explains why Fauci is probably wrong. And they wade into the news of Sen. Ted Cruz flying to Cancun while Texas is in crisis and the media reaction to it.

Join Jim and Greg as they serve up three good martinis, even if the last one is a bit iffy. First, they;re glad to see CVS reporting excellent progress administering vaccines to residents in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. They’re also happy to see the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York investigating the Cuomo administration for covering up the number of nursing home deaths. And they welcome President Biden’s goal of having K-8 students in school five days a week within his first 100 days, although they’ll believe it when they see it.

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