Praise for Georgia’s Election Reform Law

 

You’ve likely heard the howls and exhortations from Democrats, like losing gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams and losing presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) – even President Joe Biden (“This is Jim Crow in the 21st Century!”) – complaining about the election reform law in Georgia signed by Gov. Brian Kemp (R) today.

Who is Jim Crow? He was the actor in a 19th-century minstrel show depicting slaves in, shall we say, a very negative and stereotypical way. He came to symbolize the genuine voter suppression laws, predominantly in former confederate states after the Civil War until and even after World War II, malevolently targeted at Black Americans.

You’re going to be hearing a lot about “Jim Crow” in the months ahead. You already have for a very long time.

But what you’ve probably not heard are the facts. What, exactly, is contained in the 32-page Senate Bill 241 that is so terrible? Perhaps we should all read it? First, let’s summarize what is in the bill, courtesy of the Georgia Star News:

• Suspend and temporarily replace election superintendents on the basis of malfeasance, misfeasance, neglect of duty, incompetence, or inability to perform duties

• Provide for participation in a multi-state voter registration system

• Allow for the use of portable or movable polling places only under limited conditions

• Require reasons for absentee voting, require identification for requesting an absentee ballot application, and to submit an absentee ballot

• Provide for where to conduct advance voting

• Provide for a witness on absentee ballot envelopes

• Establish a voter intimidation and illegal election activities hotline

Looks pretty good to me; it is a nice start. But it does a few more things that I do and don’t like and a missed an opportunity or two.

I like the fact that it precludes the Secretary of State – the state’s chief elections officer in most states, including Georgia – from entering into “consent agreements.” Brad Raffensberger, the questionably competent Republican Secretary of State in Georgia, entered into two of them with Democrats that many believe violated state law, including “ballot curing.” That’s the ability of a voter to be notified of voting errors on their ballots – especially mail ballots – so they can be “fixed.” And doesn’t include a few things I would like to have seen added, including steps to make sure the state’s voter rolls are up to date as possible, including regular matches with the Social Security Administration’s Death Registry and national change of address registries.

I like the provision that allows the state to take over a county’s incompetent – or worse – administration of an election. Fulton County’s election board, the state’s most populous jurisdiction and home to Atlanta, is notoriously incompetent. Just ask the locals, at least the ones who pay attention. Like Georgia blogger and radio talker Erick Erickson:

The state elections board will be able to takeover County election boards when necessary. This is one of those issues where the Democrats are claiming conspiracy, but it’s actually good.

For example, the Fulton County Board of Elections in Georgia is a highly incompetent Board of Elections. That County has hired and fired the same person over and over. Fulton never gets its act together and it has nothing to do with partisanship. Every election night, we are always waiting on Fulton to finish reporting. They’ll be able to fix this.

What I really like is the provision that requires that the votes be counted nonstop until finished. That reduces the chances for shenanigans. Again, Erick Erickson:

Election workers will be required to count ballots without stopping until they’re finished. This was my idea and I’m taking credit for it. Under current Georgia law, you can stop, go home, come back the next day, and pick up the ballots and hope that there’s no hanky panky overnight while no one’s looking. Under the new law, once you start counting the ballots you cannot stop. To accommodate this, the law allows the processing and counting of absentee ballots before the election. As absentee ballots come in, they will be able to be processed now, which is another good thing. So we’re not waiting days and days and days for the absentee balloting process. This is all a really good idea.

Just to underscore Erick’s comment, jurisdictions should be allowed to begin counting absentee ballots before the election. It will require a little more security on election day, to prevent people from voting twice, but existing systems should be able to handle it. Especially if we discourage prone-to-fraud mail balloting in favor of more secure in-person voting. That was envisioned by both of the Carter (as in Jimmy, former Georgia Governor and 39th President of the United States) Commissions of the early 2000s.

It is also how most of Europe conducts elections, along with India and other democracies. Mail voting is discouraged and even outlawed in most democracies.

What I really like about the bill are the new voter ID requirements for absentee ballots. Instead of the imprecise, subjective process of matching signatures, it requires a driver’s license or official state ID (free to anyone to obtain) number on the outside envelope. That’s a much better way of ensuring voting integrity and eliminating the potential for fraud.

Here’s what I find offensive: that poor, mostly Black Americans are disenfranchised – voter suppression! – because they don’t have, or somehow cannot obtain a driver’s license or free ID card from the state. Think about that. Do you realize how many things you need an ID for in order to function in our society? Do you really think Black Americans (and others) are so stupid that they are unable to obtain even a free state ID card? That strikes me as racist, and reminiscent of the arguments made by southern racists against slaves and their freedom in the 19th century.

What I don’t like is the silly provision denying providing food and beverages to voters waiting in line, and no reference to adding polling locations where long lines typically exist. We need to encourage people to vote in person and must take steps to make it as convenient as possible. Long lines are a deterrent, and they are just as real in the suburbs as they are in some inner-city locations.

We can debate the new law’s restrictions on absentee voting, and the elimination of “no excuse” mail ballots. I’m personally open to it, but it remains a fact that in-person voting is the most secure for making sure your vote counts. Mail voting has a much higher propensity for errors, and of course rejections. It is not hard to figure out why starting with all the “chain of custody” issues involving mail or “dropbox” ballots.

Kudos to Georgia’s legislature and governor. Any miscreant who shouts “Jim Crow!” or accuses such bills as “suppression” is simply wrong and possibly malign in their intentions. Legislation is pending in other states (including Pennsylvania) to address flaws and abuses in their states. We can have good debates about some of these provisions.

At a minimum, we should agree that voter access and voter integrity are not mutually exclusive. We can, must, have both. Can we at least agree on that?

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There are 17 comments.

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  1. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    Why do we not do what the Europeans do, and have voting on a weekend day?  Nobody should be able to plead “I don’t have time to vote before/after work”.  Maybe extend in-person voting hours so everyone will have time to go vote, and no one will have to miss work to vote.

    My state has had all-mail voting for over 10 years.  Last year, I did signature-verification for my county.  It was a very interesting job, and if I had questions about a signature matching, three other people were available to help.  My supervisor told me that she thought I had a knack for the job, and I expect to be called for all subsequent elections (until we leave the state).

    • #1
  2. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Kelly D Johnston: • Suspend and temporarily replace election superintendents on the basis of malfeasance, misfeasance, neglect of duty, incompetence, or inability to perform duties

    I’m surprised this wasn’t already a rule.  Note: I don’t like the idea of “temporarily” replacing a corrupt official.  It should be permanent . . .

    • #2
  3. tigerlily Member
    tigerlily
    @tigerlily

    I like Elizabeth Warren making the false claim that Stacy Abrams is the Georgia Governor  – this after she and every other Dem asserting that the questioning of election results is tantamount to treason.

    • #3
  4. ToryWarWriter Thatcher
    ToryWarWriter
    @ToryWarWriter

    The not bringing people food and drink brings Georgia in line with Federal Statute.  And is how it works in other countries, as we dont want anyone to influence peoples decisions.

    • #4
  5. Gary Robbins Reagan
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    ToryWarWriter (View Comment):

    The not bringing people food and drink brings Georgia in line with Federal Statute. And is how it works in other countries, as we dont want anyone to influence peoples decisions.

    What federal statute?  How about a table with water which is available to everyone?  

    • #5
  6. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Sounds good, but does it all get undone when the NCAA threatens to have no more games in Georgia?

    • #6
  7. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Sounds good, but does it all get undone when the NCAA threatens to have no more games in Georgia?

    I’d be perfectly happy if the NCAA has to have all college sports games played in woke states so states with a sense of decency can pass laws protecting their citizens.  Wait until the first 7′ 2″, male-to-female transsexual basketball player shows up on the court.  Once that happens, colleges may have to actively recruit trans-men in order to stay viable in “women’s” sports . . .

    • #7
  8. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Stad (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Sounds good, but does it all get undone when the NCAA threatens to have no more games in Georgia?

    I’d be perfectly happy if the NCAA has to have all college sports games played in woke states so states with a sense of decency can pass laws protecting their citizens. Wait until the first 7′ 2″, male-to-female transsexual basketball player shows up on the court. Once that happens, colleges may have to actively recruit trans-men in order to stay viable in “women’s” sports . . .

    You think they wouldn’t do exactly that?  I expect it would be easier for them to go even more off-the-deep-end insane, rather than struggle to return to some level of normalcy.

    • #8
  9. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Stad (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Sounds good, but does it all get undone when the NCAA threatens to have no more games in Georgia?

    I’d be perfectly happy if the NCAA has to have all college sports games played in woke states so states with a sense of decency can pass laws protecting their citizens. Wait until the first 7′ 2″, male-to-female transsexual basketball player shows up on the court. Once that happens, colleges may have to actively recruit trans-men in order to stay viable in “women’s” sports . . .

    You think they wouldn’t do exactly that? I expect it would be easier for them to go even more off-the-deep-end insane, rather than struggle to return to some level of normalcy.

    I can see two versions of the NCAA – the original version with all its political correctness, and a conservative version that keeps men and women’s sports separate, and allows teams to have Indian mascots and names . . .

    • #9
  10. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Stad (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Stad (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Sounds good, but does it all get undone when the NCAA threatens to have no more games in Georgia?

    I’d be perfectly happy if the NCAA has to have all college sports games played in woke states so states with a sense of decency can pass laws protecting their citizens. Wait until the first 7′ 2″, male-to-female transsexual basketball player shows up on the court. Once that happens, colleges may have to actively recruit trans-men in order to stay viable in “women’s” sports . . .

    You think they wouldn’t do exactly that? I expect it would be easier for them to go even more off-the-deep-end insane, rather than struggle to return to some level of normalcy.

    I can see two versions of the NCAA – the original version with all its political correctness, and a conservative version that keeps men and women’s sports separate, and allows teams to have Indian mascots and names . . .

    Sure would be nice!

    • #10
  11. Quickz Member
    Quickz
    @Quickz

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):

    ToryWarWriter (View Comment):

    The not bringing people food and drink brings Georgia in line with Federal Statute. And is how it works in other countries, as we dont want anyone to influence peoples decisions.

    What federal statute? How about a table with water which is available to everyone?

    I don’t know about this Fed statute, but if that table is outside of 150 ft of the building and over 25 ft away from any line then you can give everyone ice-cold cokes and cheeseburgers. It’s the same rules that apply to campaign literature and the tables you see political parties and interest groups set up. I was stationed at one for the last election an we had a distance rule. Here is the statute, the underlined part is what was added:

    “(a) No person shall solicit votes in any manner or by any means or method, nor shall any
    991 person distribute or display any campaign material, nor shall any person give, offer to give,
    992 or participate in the giving of any money or gifts, including, but not limited to, food and
    993 drink, to an elector, nor shall any person solicit signatures for any petition, nor shall any
    994 person, other than election officials discharging their duties, establish or set up any tables
    995 or booths on any day in which ballots are being cast:
    996 (1) Within 150 feet of the outer edge of any building within which a polling place is
    997 established;
    998 (2) Within any polling place; or
    999 (3) Within 25 feet of any voter standing in line to vote at any polling place.”

    EDIT: Oh wow, really? This was my first post? I had so many big dreams, yet here I am.. lol

    EDIT2: That Federal thing kept bugging me so I looked around – I think this is what it might be about. I remember reading about the Ben & Jerry’s thing back then: https://www.eater.com/2016/11/8/13561804/election-day-free-food-for-voting-illegal

    • #11
  12. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Quickz (View Comment):

    Gary Robbins (View Comment):

    ToryWarWriter (View Comment):

    The not bringing people food and drink brings Georgia in line with Federal Statute. And is how it works in other countries, as we dont want anyone to influence peoples decisions.

    What federal statute? How about a table with water which is available to everyone?

    I don’t know about this Fed statute, but if that table is outside of 150 ft of the building and over 25 ft away from any line then you can give everyone ice-cold cokes and cheeseburgers. It’s the same rules that apply to campaign literature and the tables you see political parties and interest groups set up. I was stationed at one for the last election an we had a distance rule. Here is the statute, the underlined part is what was added:

    “(a) No person shall solicit votes in any manner or by any means or method, nor shall any
    991 person distribute or display any campaign material, nor shall any person give, offer to give,
    992 or participate in the giving of any money or gifts, including, but not limited to, food and
    993 drink, to an elector, nor shall any person solicit signatures for any petition, nor shall any
    994 person, other than election officials discharging their duties, establish or set up any tables
    995 or booths on any day in which ballots are being cast:
    996 (1) Within 150 feet of the outer edge of any building within which a polling place is
    997 established;
    998 (2) Within any polling place; or
    999 (3) Within 25 feet of any voter standing in line to vote at any polling place.”

    EDIT: Oh wow, really? This was my first post? I had so many big dreams, yet here I am.. lol

    An excellent first post, actually!  :-)

    (This was my 12,687th…)

    • #12
  13. Kelly D Johnston Coolidge
    Kelly D Johnston
    @SoupGuy

    ToryWarWriter (View Comment):

    The not bringing people food and drink brings Georgia in line with Federal Statute. And is how it works in other countries, as we dont want anyone to influence peoples decisions.

    That is a fair point. Also, certain political groups with messages on t-shirts delivering goodies in line can be a not-so-subtle form of illegal persuasion, a point made by the WSJ’s editorial on the bill this weekend.

    • #13
  14. Kelly D Johnston Coolidge
    Kelly D Johnston
    @SoupGuy

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Sounds good, but does it all get undone when the NCAA threatens to have no more games in Georgia?

    Great question. This is when we discover whether certain governors have backbones or not. 

    • #14
  15. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    kedavis (View Comment):
    I expect it would be easier for them to go even more off-the-deep-end insane, rather than struggle to return to some level of normalcy.

    Here here!  The left has made doing the wrong thing too easy . . .

    • #15
  16. Quickz Member
    Quickz
    @Quickz

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Quickz (View Comment):

     

    An excellent first post, actually! :-)

    (This was my 12,687th…)

    Hey thanks! I’ve been inspired and took a shot at my first Member Post. Give it a read!

    (Wow that’s a lot of comments! I’ve only 12,684 to go! Ha) 

    • #16
  17. Gary Robbins Reagan
    Gary Robbins
    @GaryRobbins

    Tuba City, Arizona, population 8,611, is the second largest town in Coconino County, being larger than Williams or Page.  (I live in the largest town, Flagstaff, the Coconino County Seat.)  Tuba City is in the Navajo Nation Indian Reservation, and I campaigned there in 2012 when I was running to become the Superior Court Judge.  The largest polling place is at the High School.  In the parking lot of the high school, well more than 150 feet from the polling place, the Democratic Party gave out soft drinks and hot dogs to all comers, regardless of party.  Election Day is also a holiday on Navajo Nation Indian Reservation.  Tribal elections are held on the same day, albeit at the Chapter House, about a mile away.  There is a day long festival atmosphere.  

    • #17