Tag: Elections

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Lying to Ourselves

 

We have a problem with our federal government, but it’s not exactly the one we’re used to thinking about. Frankly, we don’t want to think about it all – better to deny the reality entirely. Easier to lie and lie and lie, and blame our problems on everyone else. Easier to blame Liberals, or Wokesters, or (the current favorite among the increasingly reality-averse folks who still cannot face that Trump has immolated himself once and for all time) traitors and sabotage. It is, of course, all lies. Mind you, lies can be useful – especially when trying to avoiding hurt feelings (our own not the least), but they’re still lies. At one time rebellions against ruling monarchs favored the lie “We’re not really rebelling against the King, he’s just the victim of bad advisors.”

The lie we all tell ourselves today is that we are the helpless victims of “The DC Establishment” (or whatever other term you want to use). Synonyms for this include “Wall Street,” “Big Tech,” and a host of others. They are the “bad advisors” we blame for manipulating Congress, for stealing elections, or for disloyalty to Trump (fact check here: the only consistent disloyalty in the Trump administration came from Trump – watching his cabinet members go from vaunted heroes to filthy traitors and sellouts in the commentariat was much akin to studying Soviet photography for disappearing faces alongside Stalin). We are very good at lying to ourselves about why Trump lost this or that political battle, about why Congress is a dysfunctional mess, and about why the “authoritarian ratchet” is inexorable. The truth we cannot confront about it is all is simple, and we all bear the shame of it. We do not really want any of our congress critters, our president, or our courts to lead us out of our morass, we want them to follow us into the pit of our own making. And follow they blithely do.

Join Jim and Greg as they offer the second installment of their prestigious year-end awards. Today they remark on the people they’re most sorry to see pass away in 2020. They also share their choices for rising political stars and the political figures who appear to be fading into oblivion – rarely to be heard from again.

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I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as cause for withdrawing from a friend. –Thomas Jefferson Here we are, about to have the results of the 2020 election finalized. Much chaos has ensued in the last four years. Relationships have been strained and, in some cases, ended; much hurt […]

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We hope you and your family had a wonderful Thanksgiving! As Black Friday officially kicks off the Christmas shopping season, Jim and Greg each discuss three gifts they’d like to give political figures. The gifts range from the practical to the comical to the desperately needed.

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This presidential election apparently didn’t go the way I wanted it to, but I’ve spent a lot of time the last few weeks thinking about and discussing how great the Electoral College is—or, rather, how great a small-R republican alternative to a national popular vote is. Here’s a few reasons why I love our system. […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Trump Taught Us How to Fight Back

 

For years I’ve listened to and agreed with the diatribes about the feckless Republican party. Republicans were known for being cooperative, reasonable, even polite in their interactions with Democrats. They would also whine and complain endlessly about lying and cheating they faced, but nothing seemed to change.

People have proposed forming a new party to replace the Republicans, but that might not be necessary. We’ve had a four-year seminar on how to fight back against the Democrats and the media, and it may have been ugly, chaotic, and confusing, but the public is finally taking note: You may not like Donald Trump, but he’s a power to be reckoned with.

We’re watching Trump’s feisty and predictable demands for fairness in this election; that every vote be counted, and that fraud and manipulation are the unacceptable strategies of the Democrats in several states. Those kinds of actions are not new, but Trump is finally telling everyone that the Democrats are not going to get away with these tactics. He is calling them out big-time and will fight tooth-and-nail for the voices of the people to be heard.

Join Jim and Greg as they celebrate Republicans doing much better than expected at the state legislative level just in time for redistricting. They also discuss the ongoing controversies in multiple swing states and how the vote counting is creating a lot of mistrust in the integrity of the vote. And they look at the updated Georgia numbers, which suggest two U.S. Senate races are headed to runoffs and the results could well determine the majority.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Tara Ross, the nationally recognized author of Why We Need the Electoral College. On the eve of the 2020 election, they discuss the critical and controversial role of the Electoral College in determining which candidate will become the next President of the United States. Tara explains how the Electoral College functions, why the Framers established it, and why this key feature of the U.S. Constitution and electoral system has become such a lightning rod. They explore its historical role in balancing power between small and large states, encouraging candidates to build wide coalitions across numerous states and regions, and checking the excesses of popular passions. They also discuss the role of the Electoral College in helping to isolate closely contested elections to specific states, such as in Florida in 2000; and Tara shares thoughts on the current political landscape.

Stories of the Week: Results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) show troubling declines in grade 12 reading performance – will the results reinforce arguments to end testing? Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announced she will no longer enforce the prohibition against religious organizations applying for federal funding for charter schools – opening charters to criticisms that opponents have long leveled, that these schools are not truly public.

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This isn’t so much an “article” as a conservation starter. I can’t help but imagine some election scenarios. Unfortunately, I can’t think of a single on that doesn’t result in major riots. I’ll just start the ball rolling, and I’ll read all replies, but it’s unlikely I will have the time to comment on them. […]

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Among the many “outrages” of the 2016 presidential campaign was the comparison of Trump by some Evangelical leaders to David, an imperfect man guilty of adultery who devised the death of Bathsheba’s husband, and was, yet, capable of repentance and was used by God. I didn’t agree, but neither did I invest much thought into […]

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Bridget & Maggie reminisce about 100 episodes of Walk-Ins Welcome. What they love, what they’ve learned, favorite episodes, and they marvel at their unprecedented consistency. They explore Bridget’s gift of gab and her genuine love for talking to people (inherited from their grandmother), discuss the need for a Hero’s Journey and how lost we can become without one, and plan for the future and what they’d like to see happen for the podcast and Phetasy. Become a subscriber at phetasy.com or make a donation and support another 100 episodes!

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WAKE UP, AMERICA! The State Motto for the Commonwealth of Virginia is “Sic Semper Tyrranus”, whose Flag shows Virtus (virtue) treading Tyrant (Great Britain) underfoot, hence “Sic Semper Tyrranus” in translation advocates “Thus To All Tyrants! “The Democrats are trampling the U.S. Constitution under their feet instead. Our Virginia Republican Party is being run by Good Old […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. When Is Crime Criminal?

 

Poor Cletus. He doesn’t have any money. What’s a felon to do?

Cletus goes down to the 7-11 and sticks a gun in Mr. Maloney’s face and says “give me all your cash.” The manager complies, turns over the money, and Cletus walks out with it. It’s December 20, 2020, and Cletus needs to buy a few presents. Everyone understands even if they don’t condone the behavior. Desperate people do desperate things. That’s why 7-11 has cameras.

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Belarus is on Russia’s radar. I never paid attention to this rather sizable Eastern European country, until now. First, there are news stories coming and going quickly, buried by our current state of affairs. There is unrest in Belarus- protests – arrests – people disappearing – beatings – an election uproar. They say the leadership […]

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It almost seems like this election is more critical even than defeating Hillary. She wasn’t liked but Biden is so weak and now there are far-left types on the prowl. Who knows what has been promised to Bernie and AOC etc? I heard a few moments of Bernie saying that those forces would help Biden […]

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President Trump might not be a typical Republican, but he is making the same mistake Republicans always make. It’s true that Democrats are baiting federal officers to shoot violent insurgents. But all Republicans should know after a lifetime of experience that Democrats attack with slanderous narratives regardless of the facts. Whether or not federal officers […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. С днем ​​россии: A (Not Very) New Era in Russian Politics

 

Before COVID became the center of international news coverage, much attention was being paid to Vladimir Putin’s sudden reorganization of the Russian government and proposed overhaul of the Constitution, which has seen little change since 1993. Naturally, Vladimir Vladimirovich did not attempt to bring about these changes with a spirit of liberal democracy and healthy regime change in mind (indeed, some would say that it is very unhealthy to even think about regime change in Russia). The spread of the virus, though, which he was unable to halt even after closing the Russian border with China in January, put a wrench in his plans. 

Russia is still, right now, the third most affected country in the world with at least half a million cases (this is data compiled and released by Putin’s government, after all), and a health system that is not up to the challenge in a multitude of ways. Putin was well aware of this, which is why he closed the border so early and implemented a strict lockdown when the situation started to deteriorate. But now, more important concerns are at hand. The President has pressured the Moscow government into lifting restrictions, and, after a holiday celebration today, has planned a concert for tonight in Red Square. These moves come in plenty of time to get people comfortable with going outside and attending rallies ahead of a July 1 vote on the changes. 

Join Joe Selvaggi and Pioneer’s Mary Connaughton as they talk with MIT Professor Charles Stewart on how states in general, and Massachusetts in particular, are adapting their voting process to keep elections safe, transparent, and fair during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Charles Stewart III is the Kenan Sahin Distinguished Professor of Political Science at MIT, where he has taught since 1985, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His research and teaching areas include congressional politics, elections, and American political development. Since 2001, Professor Stewart has been a member of the Caltech/MIT Voting Technology Project, a leading research efforts that applies scientific analysis to questions about election technology, election administration, and election reform. He is currently the MIT director of the project. Professor Stewart is an established leader in the analysis of the performance of election systems and the quantitative assessment of election performance. Professor Stewart has been recognized at MIT for his undergraduate teaching, being named to the second class of MacVicar Fellows in 1994, awarded the Baker Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and the recipient of the Class of 1960 Fellowship. Since 1992, he has served as Housemaster of McCormick Hall, along with his spouse, Kathryn M. Hess. Professor Stewart received his B.A. in political science from Emory University, and S.M. and Ph.D. from Stanford University.