California Has a Housing Crisis and Can’t Figure Out How to Solve It

 

Here’s just one tidbit from California’s housing affordability crisis: According to the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, families in the northern California counties of San Francisco, San Mateo, and Marin who make as much as $117,000 a year are eligible to live in low-income housing projects. Want another one or two? Well, here you go: California’s median home value has increased by almost 80 percent to $544,900 since 2011, while more than half of renters spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing.

Not that there’s much of a mystery of what’s really happening. As the Los Angeles Times notes, “Academic researchers, state analysts and California’s gubernatorial candidates agree that the fundamental issue underlying the state’s housing crisis is that there are not enough homes for everyone who wants to live here.”

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A New Parenting Space on Ricochet

 

A few years ago, I left almost every single parenting Facebook group. I couldn’t handle the crazy. If you want to lose faith in the future of humanity, go to a parenting board on BabyCenter or on Facebook. Between the parents trying to treat the measles with essential oils and the folks who can’t figure out why their 14-year old boy they never spend time with is such a troublemaker, it results in incredibly high levels of frustration.

As with many things, there’s something different about Ricochet and its members. Every time I write a post about parenting; asking a question or making an observation, I’m struck by the wisdom of those responding. A lot of that is due to the fact that much of our member base has already raised children, and many others in the thick of parenthood are intentional people by nature; it’s why they belong to a conversation site predicated on thoughtful and measured dialogue.

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Remembering John Paul II on His Feast

 

It’s 40 years to the day since Karol Wojtyla became John Paul II. I wrote about him at the Personalist Project a few years ago:

I am still trying to get my arms around his legacy, and his influence on me and my soul. I suspect I’ll be at it for the rest of my life—trying to sort and catalogue, organize and share my thoughts about his teaching, which seems to me key to everything. At least it is the key to understanding modernity—the mind of the Church in our day and time. I have also found it, mysteriously, key to my understanding myself and my spiritual journey—the meaning and “point” of the particular struggles I’ve faced along the way.

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Sears Declares Bankruptcy

 

View original artwork here.

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Another Shooting Star, Another Fraud

 

Robert Francis O’Rourke is the latest “rising star” for the Democrat Party in Texas. He is their hope of the moment to start Texas on the path of descent into becoming the next California, a once golden state destroyed by liberal policies but consistent in sending elected Democrats to seats of power. His stated mission […]

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Do Some in the Far Left Take Pleasure in Violence?

 

It’s clear that many of the gutless wonders or calculating members of Congress, the Left-leaning media, and those who are indoctrinating young minds in academia are deliberately characterizing intimidation, mob behavior, and occasionally violence as “speech.” At the same time, they claim that speech from conservatives is “violence” … a glaring example of Orwellian “doublespeak”. Silence to condemn mob violence should be considered assent especially from those who are routinely before the public and on the airwaves. Making excuses for it, as some in the political and media class have done by declaring that Republicans who voted to confirm Brett Kavanaugh (Senate Majority Leader McConnell being the chief offender) have brought it upon themselves and is reminiscent of the charge that America itself was really to blame for the attack on 9/11 and the nearly 3,000 lives lost.

If you think I exaggerate, give a listen to former left-leaning Prof. Janet Fiamengo (University of Ottawa) in this interview with Dave Rubin. At about 16 minutes into the interview, Professor Fiamengo’s references one of the pivotal moments that occurred in her academic career that forced her to completely reevaluate her ideological outlook when she describes the “barely contained vaunting pleasure” of her fellow academics at the University of Saskatchewan when they first learned of the 9/11 attack on New York and Washington, DC.

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Zeal: Hypnotism and Zealotry

 

In the first weeks of my freshman year, my college hosted a hypnotist who gave a large demonstration. He invited volunteers to come up on stage and be hypnotized. I was curious enough that I volunteered, but when I joined the other folks on stage and the hypnotist began his work, I did not fall […]

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Nudge: November Group Writing: Elimination

 

Heard the one about the BDAN baño? I might be writing it to cover an open day in November’s Group Writing Theme schedule. To see why, drop by, peruse the topic, and please sign up. The story is real, only the names have been changed to avoid legal action. More

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Motorcycle Accidents

 

Last summer I was browsing through our towns’ police department Facebook pages because sometimes I like to see a little of what is going on in that circle. It’s very limited, but sometimes they have useful traffic or fire updates, and it’s interesting to see what crimes might be mentioned. One incident that stood out to me was the death of a motorcyclist on one of the main roads. The driver of a pickup had changed lanes into him and knocked him into a box truck. The details were sparse, as you would expect from a simple Facebook post, but the motorcyclist died, and it was hinted as likely the fault of the pickup driver.

Yesterday, I volunteered to be in the church nursery as I had been sick on my normal day and it just so happened that my husband’s aunt had also volunteered and were placed in the same room. I haven’t seen her for a while because she just retired and has been off to places like Kenya, the Philippines, and Missouri. She is one of those involved, social ladies that knows everyone and is generally up to speed on the happenings of our cities. I don’t know how people do that.*

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Zeal Gap?

 

The gallery for --> Democrats Vs Republicans MapIs there a zeal gap in American politics? This question plays off the infamous “missile gap,” a campaign fiction deployed by JFK to defeat Nixon in 1960, when Nixon was the Vice President to the General of the Armies who defeated Nazi Germany. Conventional wisdom says liberals/Democrats are zealous in politics, like sports fans, where conservatives/Republicans tend to only engage episodically. Is this advantage real, and is it still there?

Years ago, a self-identified liberal cheerfully wrote, for a major publication, that she and her fellow liberals view politics like other Americans view sports. It is fun to fire off a quick letter to a politician or corporation and make a few calls to friend and foe offices. Daily. Yes. Daily. Whereas, conservatives, and the rest of the population, only rarely rouse themselves to a single episode of political expression. This is anecdotal, but we all have anecdotes to affirm this claim.

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Searching for Meaning After Trauma

 

“There are no atheists in a foxhole.” Though the aphorism may date from the 20th century, the idea that we seek connections when we are most alone, afraid, and even traumatized is not modern. It seems to be a hardwired human feature.

We can find comfort in our parents, spouses, and children – as well as belonging to extended families or communities, tribes, and nations. But that is not necessarily all that is asked of us. If, as I would argue, G-d wants us to seek a relationship with Him, then He made us needy, so that we would reach out for Him.

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