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Any time you can get dogs and ponies, of any size, into the same act, you have a winner. Wallace Tripp got that combination down in splendidly ridiculous form in his 1974 illustrated book of verse A Great Big Ugly Man Came Up and Tied His Horse to Me. The moment after this month’s theme came […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Ave Atque Vale: Frank Zbozny, Rest In Peace

 

My husband, Frank Zbozny (see–I always told you I could win a game of Scrabble in one go, if only proper names were allowed), has died. Many of you know of his decades-long struggle with dementia, and of the cardiac and other physical problems that began to sap his strength in 2012 or thereabouts. But he was himself almost to the end. The last intelligible word he spoke to me was two days ago, after I enabled what I believe was one of his last pleasant physical sensations on this earth (so I did it often), the deployment of a just-warmed-in-the-dryer comforter over the top of him. He smiled. I asked him how that felt. He thought. And over the course of about ten seconds, the courtly and rather old-fashioned gentleman I married, 39 years ago on July 24 of this year (I wrote about that marriage here), managed to get the word out: “Deee–li–cious.”

We started out our married life quite poor, at least in financial terms. I was a Teaching Assistant, and Frank was an Assistant Professor of English, at a time (early 1980s) when a liberal arts career path was beginning to be deprecated in favor of a business education, so he wasn’t terribly well paid. We lived at the very end of a dead-end street, in a run-down little house picturesquely situated just above the exhaust vents of Pittsburgh’s Liberty Tunnels. I was assaulted once, going home after work as I walked up the hill from the streetcar stop. I was fondled by the disgusting creep (kneed him in the crotch), and my purse was stolen. Our house was ransacked one evening when we were out, and the very few items of value, both real and sentimental, that we owned, were taken. (I remember, on both of those occasions, feeling utterly violated. It was three-and-a-half decades before I felt anything else as wrenching, or even remotely comparable in terms of being flayed alive in a public space.) One day, I drove home from work to find gangs of thugs in the middle of the street watching a couple of pit bulls fight in the back of a pickup truck. I had them arrested and carted off to jail. It required a bit more moxie than it might today, as this was well before the days when cell phones were in widespread use. So I parked my car in the middle of the street above them (so they couldn’t leave, because dead-end), walked through and past them, while they jeered and insulted me, walked up the steps of the house, and called the police. Frank’s comment? “You would have made a good United States Marine.” Made me proud then. Almost makes me proud now.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Demotivators

 

In the late ’80s and early ’90s when I worked in the corporate world, I would sometimes encounter motivational posters. You know, the ones with a photo with a black border with some motivational slogan about teamwork or some other ostensibly desirable trait. After seeing them a few times, it became tedious, and in later years I discovered “Demotivators,” cynical yet very funny imitations of the originals. Here are a few faves, including one with my late lab, Buster. Yes, there are do it yourself demotivator meme factories.

Please share any favorites or make a new one.

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I had a mini debate/discussion with my neighbor yesterday. I mentioned that the original goal of lockdown was to flatten the curve. More

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Proposal: Home Ec and Shop Class Groups

 

I’ve thinking about ways to make Ricochet more useful for members, particularly as a break from pure politics. We’re conservatives, not totalitarian Leftists. We have families, hobbies, and careers that are separate from politics. Besides, we have most of the political stuff already covered.

When I joined The Firing Line, I was impressed by how helpful people were and the tips they shared. We have actual firearms instructors and veterans, along with beginners like me and everyone in between. It’s generally focused on firearms, not even on the politics of firearms. It is highly recommended if you have an interest in firearms. That got me thinking – always a dangerous idea.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: A Representative and His Duties

 

“Your representative owes you, not his industry only, but his judgment; and he betrays, instead of serving you, if he sacrifices it to your opinion.” — Edmund Burke

I knew a man, one of many pleasant anachronisms in my life that I did nothing to deserve. His friends called him “Bill.” We, his family, called him ” Papa.” He was born exactly 88 years ago, but I only first met him 59 years later. He was my mother’s father, the leader of an 11-member clan, and eventually a grandfather of 18. Things haven’t been the same since we lost him two years ago; such a man is not easily replaced. I might not go so far as to call him “great” – there will not likely be any institutions named after him, no statues either (thank goodness!) – but a good man is hard to find, and William Joseph Taylor was an especially good man.

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WHO Quietly Changes COVID Timeline following Republican Questioning The World Health Organization quietly changed its timeline of the coronavirus pandemic’s first days on Tuesday, clarifying that the Chinese Communist Party never informed the organization of the pandemic on December 31, despite previous claims to the contrary. More

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…have always been a passion of mine. That’s why if any of my family is present when I say out loud, “That reminds me of…” they immediately try to divert my attention. If that doesn’t work, attempted strangulation has been known to occur.] While opening a package of lemonade mix this morning, I was reminded […]

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So let’s talk facts: there is a country that is a gateway nation between the East and the West. Perhaps no other nation on the globe is as well established as the hub for where two separate parts of the world become intertwined. To say that it has an international flavor, with people from all […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Happy Independence Day!

 

Just a reminder that the flagship podcast of this establishment is taking the week off to celebrate the holiday. For your listening enjoyment may we suggest trying one of the many new entries that have joined our ranks in the last month?

Speak-Easy with Shermichael Singleton and Antonia Okafor

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It turns out Christopher Columbus set out to liberate Jerusalem from the Muslims — Crusader. This is documented in his writings and in his agreement with Queen Isabella. He was convinced the end of the world was imminent as indicated by the mass death of the Black Plague, and that Jesus was coming back to […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Midnight in the Republic, Volume 4

 

“In one of my antislavery campaigns in New York five and thirty years ago I had an appointment at Victor, a town in Ontario County. I was compelled to stop at the hotel. It was the custom at that time to seat the guests at a long table running the length of the dining-room. When I entered I was shown a little table off in the corner. I knew what it meant, but took my dinner all the same. When I went to the desk to pay my bill I said, ‘Now, landlord, be good enough to tell me just why you gave me my dinner at the little table in the corner by myself.’ He was equal to the occasion, and quickly replied, ‘Because, you see, I wished to give you something better than the others.’ The cool reply staggered me, and I gathered up my change, muttering only that I did not want to be treated better than other people, and bade him good morning.” – The Life and Times of Frederick Douglass, Page 331

[Emphasis added]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Columbus’s Greatest Crime

 

Slavery, advanced weapons technology and countless micro aggressions by the first European invaders of America were nothing compared to the devastation caused by the Old World diseases they brought, particularly smallpox. How amazing is it that we are discovering the wonders of wokeness at the same time we submit to the magic of social distancing and porous masks and have thus suddenly found Cristoforo Columbo at the center of it all, like some one-man warp in the fabric of time. 

If only Columbus and his guys had worn a mask and kept social distance from indigenous American people (or at least from those they were not hitting with their swords made of fine Toledo steel), tens of millions of lives could have been saved from smallpox-filled exhaled droplets.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Geography of Hate: Let the Great Renaming Begin

 

The statues are coming down, and buildings are being renamed, but those are small potatoes in the war for revolutionary change. Everywhere around us, the names of oppression chain us down in a Geography of Hate. It’s time to take these names of the colonizers, the slaveowners, and the false religions imposed on the indigenous peoples by the colonial invaders. How can we create a society of justice and equality when we live in places whose names reinforce the hierarchies of exploitation and discrimination that have kept people of color in bondage for millennia?

If Kazakhstan does it, then it MUST be a good idea.

Names we should immediately change include (but are not limited to):

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Problematic Insect

 

I understand that in today’s culture people on the Left are trying hard to out woke each other. I also know that colleges are the worst offenders. Despite all of that, when I saw this story I assumed it was some sort of parody.

Emory & Henry College is trying to decide if they should change their team mascot might have a negative impact on inclusion and diversity. Normally when you hear that the teams involved have some sort of Native American based name. But animal names?

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About a week ago, I made a comment to @rushbabe49 in one of @henryracette‘s posts about doing a top 10 for conservative visitors to Ireland. Like most of my bright ideas, it was much harder than I thought to come up with 10 things. I’m calling this Part 1 in case I think of something […]

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What’s your bottom-ranking memory of AIDS hysteria? They should all be tied for last but here is one that for me anyway manages to stay just above the crowd: a story in the Brazilian newsmagazine VEJA about Ayds. The diet candy/drug. I’d forgotten about it, having only ever seen it advertised in American magazines years […]

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“What am I, chopped liver?” is an expression of uncertain origin. It seems to arise from a traditional European Jewish side dish. That suggests discounting or overlooking someone, as one might overlook or reach last for a side dish, after the entree. Chopped liver is certainly less prestigious than goose liver foie gras, although likely […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

For Generation Researchers, defining our youngest generation is still a work in progress, but they are pretty confident that Covid-19 is going to be that generation’s defining moment. For a generation already incredibly skeptical of government authority and of anyone claiming to have the book on what is “Truth,” the handling of the Sars-Cov-2 virus […]

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