Tag: American Politics

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A favorite writer is Lord Conrad Black. The Quebec-born Canadian media mogul and British subject writes for Canada’s estimable National Post and a relatively new media outlet, the New York Sun. His work occasionally surfaces elsewhere. Below, he outlines how the “Church Commission” – not named after a place of worship but an aggressive partisan […]

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I received an email early Thursday from Toby Young, the editor of a blog site I follow, the Daily Sceptic, published in the United Kingdom. It’s posted at the end and builds on his excellent post here at Ricochet today. He mentions the demonetization of another site I follow and have contributed to, the Free […]

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What Does Lindsey Graham’s ‘Abortion Ban’ Accomplish?

 

You’ve likely seen the headlines, often wildly inaccurate, on Sen. Lindsey Graham’s (R-SC) legislation to federalize abortion laws. It would prohibit abortions after 15 weeks, which some claim is when a fetus feels pain, except to save the life of the mother.

“Lindsey Graham’s national abortion ban bill makes the midterm stakes very clear,” screamed Vox, a leftist blog site. “Lindsey Graham proposes new national abortion restrictions bill,” proclaimed Axios, a fast-growing leftist news site.

Here We Go Again: More Presentism

 

You do not teach history by rewriting or removing it. But you might just revisit it.

That obvious truism has escaped the conscientiousness of Virginia’s 8th District US Representative, wealthy foreign auto dealer Don Beyer and the Commonwealth’s equally woke junior US Senator, Tim Kaine, both Democrats who are pursuing legislation to remove Robert E. Lee’s name from the Robert E. Lee Memorial (Arlington House), a home his wife inherited from his father-in-law and stepson of George Washington, and lived in briefly.

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I am pleased to share that I am speaking today at Constitution week festivities in the beautiful western slope community of Grand Lake, Colorado. I’ll be discussing that other Article I branch of government, the United States Senate. It begins at 11 a.m. Mountain Daylight Time, 1 p.m. Eastern, at the Zoom address linked below.  […]

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Israeli political philosopher Yoram Hazony (’86) discusses the Enlightenment, the American Founding, his latest book: Conservatism: A Rediscovery, and Conservatism’s past and future.

Dr. Hazony is the the President of the Herzl Institute, based in Jerusalem, and the chairman of the Edmund Burke Foundation, a public affairs institute based in Washington D.C., which recently hosted the popular National Conservatism Conference in Miami, FL.

The Tale of Two Tragedies: Elizabeth II’s Passing and Charles’ Ascension

 

You can’t fully prepare for someone’s passing, even though you know it’s coming. Look at Great Britain today. Queen Elizabeth II — God rest her soul — was 96 years old. The country mourns, and most of the world pays tribute.

I’ll add my two cents. While I am no fan of monarchies, constitutional or otherwise, there’s something to be said about such an exemplar of grace, humility, service, civility, and duty. Queen Elizabeth swore in her 15th prime minister some 48 hours before she died. She was the ultimate institutionalist, in a good way — preserving and protecting the continuity of the British throne for 70 years and 214 days, British tradition, and her extraordinary marriage to the late Prince Phillip. Her children? Well, not so much, but no one is perfect. At least Prince Edward, her youngest, and his bride, Sophie, are wonderful examples of happy and successful royals in their own right.

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Republicans are often accused of initiating war on cultural issues and “taking away rights.” But it’s congressional Democrats who are using issues like abortion and same-sex marriage for purely political purposes and, in effect, attacking religious liberty. The latest is an effort by Senate Democratic Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY) to bring legislation to the […]

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Disney Does a 180-degree Turn on Satan. Stop Feeding the Mouse

 

On my first trip to Washington, DC as a Civil Air Patrol cadet making my way to Canada in 1974, one of the first places I visited was the infamous “Exorcist steps” near the Francis Scott Key Bridge that connects Georgetown to Rosslyn in Northern Virginia. It was an easy walk from the Key Bridge Marriott where I was staying.

I would not see the movie until years later, but those who remember the harrowing 1973 movie will know. The website theculturetrip.com explains:

Located in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. is a set of stairs known as The Exorcist steps, which are famous for being featured in the 1973 film The Exorcist. In the movie, actor Jason Miller plays the role of a priest, Father Karras, who falls down the stairs head first and tumbles to his death during an attempt to try and rid a little girl of her evil spirits. . .

Confession Time! But No Apologies

 

Clinton fixer Lanny Davis is rightly celebrated for his political strategy to counter attacks or scandals. “Tell it early, tell it all, and tell it yourself,” he said, authoring a book with that subtitle.

It’s good advice. And while I will never place my name in nomination for any public office, invoking terms attributed to famous Civil War Union General William T. Sherman, allow me to follow Davis’s sage advice.

The Stupid. It Hurts.

 

As a longtime political operative, I love the “art of the comeback” or the retort. They often occur during televised political debates. When I was coaching congressional candidates for debates, we often proposed retorts to accusations or statements our opponents were likely to raise. Conversely, we warned of ones they might use.

One of the best retorts in political history occurred in 1988 during the vice presidential debate between two US Senators – Lloyd Bentsen (D-TX) and Dan Quayle (R-IN). Chris Lamb tells the story:

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I invest little time in the toxic swamp known as Twitter, but I follow a few favorite contributors via an anonymous account. One such account is @IowaHawkBlog, the handle of David Burge. He profiles himself as “Karma’s janitor.” The snark is strong with Mr. Burge. He is one of the most clever wordsmiths on Twitter, […]

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Having been involved in special congressional elections, they are often hard to poll and analyze. They typically aren’t “bellwethers” until they are. This is especially true for special elections in districts that coincide with decennial redistricting. That can be very confusing. An especially painful memory involves a special election I helped co-manage. In 1985, following […]

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Why Are Working-Class Americans Paying For Your Student Loan “Forgiveness?”

 

Everyone has a story. And if you’re one of the millions of Americans who eschewed a college education for other vocations – homebuilding, plumbing, truck driving, or a host of manufacturing and service jobs – I bet you have a story, too. Or worked to pay off your debt. Perhaps with a little help from family or “angels.”

Now would be a good time to tell your story.

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During the 1994 elections, I chaired an informal organization of senior GOP congressional aides. We met monthly to hear from various GOP newsmakers and insiders. Before the historic 1994 “Contract with America” election, I invited the House and Senate GOP campaign committees’ staff directors and Republican National Committee chair and future two-term Mississippi Governor Haley […]

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Pretend you’re a US Senator and presented with this choice: You have $80 billion to “invest” to bolster recruitment and staffing in one of these public-funded institutions. You can choose one or two out of three (yes, I know there is a fourth choice. Play along): A. Give it all to the Internal Revenue Service […]

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Nothing Is Certain But Death and Taxes. The IRS Can Deliver Both

 

In Orwellian Washington, DC-speak, a “budget reconciliation” bill is winging its way through Congress. Under the post-Watergate 1974 Budget Control and Impoundment Act, “reconciliation” bills have special status, especially in the United States Senate.

More Orwellian than calling it a “reconciliation” bill is its actual title: The Inflation Reduction Act. It does no such thing. But by the time you read this, it will likely have passed the Senate and is on its way to being rubber-stamped by a House narrowly controlled by Democrats and signed by a clueless, hapless, and compliant President. The Senate vote, I predict, will be 51-50, with Kamala Harris breaking the tie. There is always a chance a Senator won’t show up but don’t count on that.

A Tragedy Hits Home

 

You don’t need to know someone for their tragic death to hit home. Anything associated with the tragedy – the location, their jobs, or even the sudden, inexplicable loss of innocent life – can trigger the equivalent of a gut punch.

That happened to me yesterday upon learning of the death of US Rep. Jackie Walorski, the five-term Republican US Representative from Indiana’s Second Congressional District. Two of her young aides – her district director, Zachery Potts, 27, and communications director (press secretary) Emma Thomson, 28 – perished while traveling via car north on a two-lane Indiana state road (19) when the vehicle she was riding crossed the southbound lane, killing another driver. Horrific.