Nothing Is Ever Going Back to Normal

 

National Review — after previously offering that Drag Queen Story Hour was a “blessing of liberty”  and railing against Florida Governor Ron de Santis for modest efforts at pushing back against the left — finds itself shocked… shockedat the metastasizing phenomenon of leftists foisting drag shows (featuring men strutting pretending to be women as if women were clown-prostitutes) on children. “Oh, my heck!” they proclaim. “Who could have foreseen that if we indulged the left in their depravity they would push it even further?

It’s understandable why (Bush) Republicans and (Atlantic) Conservatives would prefer not to fight the culture wars. It’s just not gentlemanly/ladylike to make a big fuss about leftists sexualizing children. It’s icky and Trumpy to confront the left about their cultural ambitions and their use of every lever of Government to promote them.  And because they don’t want to fight, it’s very easy to succumb to denialism. “Yes, sure, there are a few crazies on the fringe of the left, but most of them don’t want to get gay with kids. And if we just calmed down and found some common ground we could get back to normal. Hey, why are those people over there making those kids shove cash in that transvestite’s thong?”

In Defense of Political Escalation,” Abigail Shrier makes the eminently logical point that the left has no intention of ending the culture wars, or even a ceasefire.

Those waiting on the mythical pendulum to “swing back,” should stop holding their breath. The gender activists are True Believers, akin to jihadists: no amount of reasoning diminishes their resolve, no appeal to data brings them pause, no urge to consider the sanctity of American liberties will convince them to cool it.

While conservatives have been waiting for things to calm down and get back to normal, and fretting that “we oughtn’t do things that are at odds with our precious principles,” the left have seized not just Government power, but also academic power, media power, and even corporate power which they eagerly wield against anyone who dissents from Woke ideology.

If the woke continue to gain ground, where will we skeptics go to educate our children, transact commerce, find fair adjudication of our custody disputes? Where will we publish when not only the New York Times has a “gender director”—when every publication does?

That is the worry that likely motivates DeSantis, the first politician to “weaponize” the Florida tax code. He brought its hammer down on Disney to punish that one company for using its immense corporate coffers to lobby against parents’ rights in Florida. In principle, it’s a move I’m leery of. (And in the case of sending CPS after moms and dads who take their kids to drag shows, it’s a move I would oppose.)

But the gist of this stratagem—escalation—may be necessary. Indeed, it already seems to be working. Playing offense, even raising the stakes, may be the only means of achieving a much-needed truce. I’m out of better ideas. How about you?

Yeah, if there is another way to bring the culture back to plumb, I would be interested to hear it. But pundits writing hand-wringing articles in magazines that are only read by other pundits doesn’t seem like an effective solution to me.

And it’s not just the gender bending. The left will never give up on CRT. They will never give up on Climate Totalitarianism. They will never, despite John Cornyn’s delusions,  give up on zero-tolerance gun control.

They don’t want to make a deal; they want our complete submission.

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  1. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

     

    He also thinks it is a state’s right to decide.

     

    Completely the opposite: Trump emphatically did NOT support the state of North Carolina, he supported the idea that guys who call themselves gals should be allowed to use the women’s bathroom. That’s far more egregious in my mind, and corrosive to the culture, then David French supporting the First Amendment.

    Disney does not have a First Amendment right to preferential treatment in perpetuity.

    I agree. I just think the special district status was beneficial to the residents of the area. I could have wished for some other way to punish Disney.

    In the beginning, for what Disney wanted? I think the deal was better than the obnoxious tax breaks that cities pull out to attract behemoths, but at this point, I don’t think it helps as much as it did. It might be a neutral. We’ll see. There are mixed views on Disney in Orlando. A decent amount aren’t really big fans. When they talk with pride, it’s over UCF transforming from a nursing school to a full fledged university with a competitive football team

    • #181
  2. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    It isn’t just that they don’t support my views. It’s that I’m an ignorant, white supremacist hick who voted for a man with no policy positions because I’m stupid.

    That is the line. And it’s why I’m not big on you, either. It’s the idea that people who had no reservations about voting for Trump in the 2016 primaries must have been personality cult worshipers. That attitude came from there. It’s prevalence on Ricochet in 2015-2020 came from NR. The drink bleach, Covington kids, Nazis = good people – all of that was regurgitated by NR writers.

    Understand this – I’m not ashamed of my political views or the beliefs that formed them. I’m not ashamed of my vote for Trump. And it was not worship, but voting for the only man on the playing field that even attempted to articulate my own views. NR loses because they think those policies are worthless.

    But National Review doesn’t think all of Trump’s policies were worthless. There’s a range of opinions on Trump and his policies because there are writers with different viewpoints. But they don’t worship him.

    They didn’t believe Trump HAD policies.

    But that’s not borne out by the facts. Do you want me to provide you with links to NR articles discussing Trump policies? I’d be happy to.

    • #182
  3. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    HeavyWater (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Concretevol (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    Snobbery…

    How dare someone question the wisdom of familial isolation?

    Sometimes you have to move to where the work is, not just sit at home and collect food stamps.

    Again, isolating people from family and community is not good. If your economic policies depend on people moving far from their families to get service jobs in big cities, there is something wrong with the policies.

    And there were.

    People who are far removed from family are more dependent on government assistance because their family isn’t around. And service industry jobs still use government assistance.

    Really? My ancestors came from Ireland. They moved because they needed to find a place where they could have opportunities. They had a lot tougher time of it than do modern Americans as no one gave them a welfare check.

    They relied on churches and missions, instead!

    Not my ancestors. There weren’t any churches, so they built them themselves.

    • #183
  4. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    I’m certainly not ashamed of my vote for President Trump. I’m shocked that Ricochet’s Biden voters are okay with what he’s done to this country. Perhaps they blame President Trump . . . somehow . . . for what Biden’s done.

    But I wasn’t ashamed at any time between 2016 and 2020 either, no matter how many times Ricochet’s Biden voters declared that I was racist for voting for Trump, some kind of cult member for voting for Trump, anti-intellectual for voting for Trump, a red-neck savage from flyover country for voting for Trump, a drug-addicted welfare recipient for voting for Trump, or whatever new slur they could come up with because they decided they were so much better than I was because they knew better than to vote for the awful Orange Man. One infamous Ricochet member insisted that Ricochet’s Trump voters must all apologize for their votes.

    I know who should be ashamed of their votes, and it’s not me.

    I voted for Trump in 2020. Personally, I think people who voted for Biden should be embarassed. Ashamed? That seems a bit much – people have their reasons – but I think some embarassment at least is in order.

    Seems like the only reason to not be ashamed of voting for Biden would be if they didn’t know how awful a person he was. But to be a grown-up supposedly intelligent person and NOT know that, is also something to be ashamed of.

    Well, I can’t argue with that!

    • #184
  5. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Headedwest (View Comment):

    HeavyWater (View Comment):

    The reality is that Trump did donate lots of money to Chuch Schumer, Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi.

    You can’t be honest and call those donations Trump made “conservative.”

    You probably could call the donations to Schumer “the cost of doing business in New York State”.

    And, the implication of my previous comment on this, donating to Reid and Pelosi is part of “the cost of doing especially nationwide/international business in the United States with a lot of Democrat control of Congress and the various administrations.”

    Microsoft didn’t only donate to the campaigns of the House of Representatives member(s) for the Seattle area.

    • #185
  6. Headedwest Inactive
    Headedwest
    @Headedwest

    Concretevol (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    In the case of some people in my family, they ARE working in failing towns, living in houses they own outright but are worth little on the market. It’s a struggle but it’s where generations of family have lived their lives and where they wish to stay. If they moved to a place with a higher cost of living and better economy, they’d be far behind on the frictional losses, little or no better off economically, and certainly unhappy. None of them are druggies or on welfare but they are pretty much going to be living out their lives where they are. 

    Williamson painted with a massively broad brush, and with malice.

    • #186
  7. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Stina (View Comment):

    And what caused people to move from Ireland and England to the states? Couldn’t have been economic policies leading to disasters, could it?

    Of course. The point is that they moved. You seem to think that moving to where there is opportunity is somehow too much to expect.

    • #187
  8. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

     

    He also thinks it is a state’s right to decide.

     

    Completely the opposite: Trump emphatically did NOT support the state of North Carolina, he supported the idea that guys who call themselves gals should be allowed to use the women’s bathroom. That’s far more egregious in my mind, and corrosive to the culture, then David French supporting the First Amendment.

    Disney does not have a First Amendment right to preferential treatment in perpetuity.

    I agree. I just think the special district status was beneficial to the residents of the area. I could have wished for some other way to punish Disney.

    If Disney tax money is now spread out beyond just the immediate Disney properties, the residents of the area might benefit even more.

    Maybe. I hope that’s the case. To be honest I think that the revocation of the special status won’t actually go through. They put it out a year or so, and I expect there will be a lot of negotiating before that comes to pass.

    • #188
  9. Headedwest Inactive
    Headedwest
    @Headedwest

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    I just think the special district status was beneficial to the residents of the area. I could have wished for some other way to punish Disney.

    The only thing I know for sure is that it was beneficial to Disney (or they would have been insane to ask for it).

    Got any data on how it benefitted residents?

    • #189
  10. DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    But National Review doesn’t think all of Trump’s policies were worthless. There’s a range of opinions on Trump and his policies because there are writers with different viewpoints. But they don’t worship him.

    I keep asking you to stop with this language, and you don’t. I assume it’s because you think it’s a clever put-down. It’s not clever, and it makes you look nasty.

    I use the language because that’s what it looks like to me – it reminds me very much of the adulation the progressives had for Obama. I am uncomfortable, as an American, with this adulation that seemingly can’t bear criticism of the Messiah at hand, whether Obama or Trump. At its best, it’s a cult of personality. At its worst, it has religious-like aspects to it and so “worship” is as good a term as any.

    I would have expected you to have engaged in good faith with enough Trump voters on Ricochet to understand why it’s a dishonest and lazy slur.

    • #190
  11. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Headedwest (View Comment):

    Concretevol (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    In the case of some people in my family, they ARE working in failing towns, living in houses they own outright but are worth little on the market. It’s a struggle but it’s where generations of family have lived their lives and where they wish to stay. If they moved to a place with a higher cost of living and better economy, they’d be far behind on the frictional losses, little or no better off economically, and certainly unhappy. None of them are druggies or on welfare but they are pretty much going to be living out their lives where they are.

    Williamson painted with a massively broad brush, and with malice.

    It doesn’t appear that the family members you describe are the ones Williamson was writing about, if they aren’t on welfare.

    • #191
  12. Headedwest Inactive
    Headedwest
    @Headedwest

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Headedwest (View Comment):

    Concretevol (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    In the case of some people in my family, they ARE working in failing towns, living in houses they own outright but are worth little on the market. It’s a struggle but it’s where generations of family have lived their lives and where they wish to stay. If they moved to a place with a higher cost of living and better economy, they’d be far behind on the frictional losses, little or no better off economically, and certainly unhappy. None of them are druggies or on welfare but they are pretty much going to be living out their lives where they are.

    Williamson painted with a massively broad brush, and with malice.

    It doesn’t appear that the family members you describe are the ones Williamson was writing about, if they aren’t on welfare.

    He wrote that if you live in a declining town and don’t move, he wants you to die.

    • #192
  13. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    But National Review doesn’t think all of Trump’s policies were worthless. There’s a range of opinions on Trump and his policies because there are writers with different viewpoints. But they don’t worship him.

    I keep asking you to stop with this language, and you don’t. I assume it’s because you think it’s a clever put-down. It’s not clever, and it makes you look nasty.

    I use the language because that’s what it looks like to me – it reminds me very much of the adulation the progressives had for Obama. I am uncomfortable, as an American, with this adulation that seemingly can’t bear criticism of the Messiah at hand, whether Obama or Trump. At its best, it’s a cult of personality. At its worst, it has religious-like aspects to it and so “worship” is as good a term as any.

    I would have expected you to have engaged in good faith with enough Trump voters on Ricochet to understand why it’s a dishonest and lazy slur.

    I AM a Trump voter, Drew. You seem to forget that. And I don’t think that it’s either lazy or dishonest to use the terms I do when I think it fits. I certainly wouldn’t apply it to all the other Trump voters here, but it applies to some.

    • #193
  14. DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    One thing I can’t stand and I will always object to is the way so-called “conservatives” go after poor people. Stop it, guys. It’s sickening. If you’re having trouble making ends meet, do you really think “just move to a different city and get a new job” is such a simple thing do to? In this economy? Where the cost of housing is so far out of whack that the only people who could really afford to make such a move have no need to do so?

    Good lord, have a little compassion.

    • #194
  15. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Headedwest (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Headedwest (View Comment):

    Concretevol (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    In the case of some people in my family, they ARE working in failing towns, living in houses they own outright but are worth little on the market. It’s a struggle but it’s where generations of family have lived their lives and where they wish to stay. If they moved to a place with a higher cost of living and better economy, they’d be far behind on the frictional losses, little or no better off economically, and certainly unhappy. None of them are druggies or on welfare but they are pretty much going to be living out their lives where they are.

    Williamson painted with a massively broad brush, and with malice.

    It doesn’t appear that the family members you describe are the ones Williamson was writing about, if they aren’t on welfare.

    He wrote that if you live in a declining town and don’t move, he wants you to die.

    I read that article, and granted, it was a while ago, but I don’t recall that being what he wrote. I remember the article suggesting that welfare benefits be applied to moving costs to help people access opportunities. 

    • #195
  16. Justin Other Lawyer Coolidge
    Justin Other Lawyer
    @DouglasMyers

    Headedwest (View Comment):

    Concretevol (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    In the case of some people in my family, they ARE working in failing towns, living in houses they own outright but are worth little on the market. It’s a struggle but it’s where generations of family have lived their lives and where they wish to stay. If they moved to a place with a higher cost of living and better economy, they’d be far behind on the frictional losses, little or no better off economically, and certainly unhappy. None of them are druggies or on welfare but they are pretty much going to be living out their lives where they are.

    Williamson painted with a massively broad brush, and with malice.

    Yes, Williamson generalized, but I don’t think the brush was too broad.  Nor was there malice.  He writes rather pointedly, however, and he pulls very few punches–if there’s no work, find a way to go where the work is.  I don’t see that as “malicious”.

    • #196
  17. DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    KW is an ass, and he enjoys being an ass. Insult-punditry gives you a temporary thrill, but in the end — if you’re human — should leave you with regret.

    • #197
  18. Headedwest Inactive
    Headedwest
    @Headedwest

    Justin Other Lawyer (View Comment):

    Headedwest (View Comment):

    Concretevol (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    In the case of some people in my family, they ARE working in failing towns, living in houses they own outright but are worth little on the market. It’s a struggle but it’s where generations of family have lived their lives and where they wish to stay. If they moved to a place with a higher cost of living and better economy, they’d be far behind on the frictional losses, little or no better off economically, and certainly unhappy. None of them are druggies or on welfare but they are pretty much going to be living out their lives where they are.

    Williamson painted with a massively broad brush, and with malice.

    Yes, Williamson generalized, but I don’t think the brush was too broad. Nor was there malice. He writes rather pointedly, however, and he pulls very few punches–if there’s no work, find a way to go where the work is. I don’t see that as “malicious”.

    Maybe so. Maybe it’s just his toxic personality that makes it come out that way.

    • #198
  19. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    One thing I can’t stand and I will always object to is the way so-called “conservatives” go after poor people. Stop it, guys. It’s sickening. If you’re having trouble making ends meet, do you really think “just move to a different city and get a new job” is such a simple thing do to? In this economy? Where the cost of housing is so far out of whack that the only people who could really afford to make such a move have no need to do so?

    Good lord, have a little compassion.

    This has less to do with “going after the poor ” then it does with defending Williamson, who as I recall was suggesting that welfare benefits be restructured so that they could be applied to moving expenses. This only came up here because of the effort to disparage National Review and so I guess this Williamson column had to be attacked again….

    • #199
  20. Jager Coolidge
    Jager
    @Jager

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment)

    I would have expected you to have engaged in good faith with enough Trump voters on Ricochet to understand why it’s a dishonest and lazy slur.

    I AM a Trump voter, Drew. You seem to forget that. And I don’t think that it’s either lazy or dishonest to use the terms I do when I think it fits. I certainly wouldn’t apply it to all the other Trump voters here, but it applies to some.

    The problem with this formulation is that Cult and messiah stuff was first used by the left and extreme NeverTrumpers to tar any and all people who would be willing to vote for Trump. So this means you as well. It has become and insult that applies to anyone who would consider voting for Trump or objecting to the Media Narratives. You can not possibly disagree for a logical reason you just must be a member of a Cult. 

    Objecting to a large number of attacks on Trump is actually pretty easy without being a member of “cult”. The Dems and the media can’t just tell us what happened honestly and let the chip fall where they may.  Whether it is Schiff in the impeachment or Cheney in the Jan 6, they edit comments and take thing out of context. Then we here the unedited and true version of events. Pointing out that these people are lying makes one a member of a “cult” 

    I wish Trump had been better in a number of areas, I actually hope he does not run again, that does not mean I am going to accept lies based on edited comments. 

    • #200
  21. Justin Other Lawyer Coolidge
    Justin Other Lawyer
    @DouglasMyers

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    KW is an ass, and he enjoys being an ass. Insult-punditry gives you a temporary thrill, but in the end — if you’re human — should leave you with regret.

    I’m afraid this is something of the pot calling the kettle black?  I have seen you regularly insult others and name-call on this site.  In fact, just now you called KDW an a**.  

    • #201
  22. DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Justin Other Lawyer (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    KW is an ass, and he enjoys being an ass. Insult-punditry gives you a temporary thrill, but in the end — if you’re human — should leave you with regret.

    I’m afraid this is something of the pot calling the kettle black?

    I cop to that! It’s why I know one should have regret. I don’t get paid for it and have legions of followers who celebrate me for being an ass, though. I’m sure that KW doesn’t have any regret. He just moves on to another insult-laden column.

     

    • #202
  23. AMD Texas Coolidge
    AMD Texas
    @DarinJohnson

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    That’s at least twice now where participants in this thread have used welfare recipient as a slur. Attacking poor people is really not a good look, guys.

    I didn’t notice it being used as a slur. I saw it being used as a point of fact. 

    • #203
  24. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    But National Review doesn’t think all of Trump’s policies were worthless. There’s a range of opinions on Trump and his policies because there are writers with different viewpoints. But they don’t worship him.

    I keep asking you to stop with this language, and you don’t. I assume it’s because you think it’s a clever put-down. It’s not clever, and it makes you look nasty.

    I use the language because that’s what it looks like to me – it reminds me very much of the adulation the progressives had for Obama. I am uncomfortable, as an American, with this adulation that seemingly can’t bear criticism of the Messiah at hand, whether Obama or Trump. At its best, it’s a cult of personality. At its worst, it has religious-like aspects to it and so “worship” is as good a term as any.

    What about if people really “worship” the Constitution and you’re just mistaking that, for “worshipping” someone who also supports it, especially far more than the people in charge now?

    • #204
  25. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

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    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    Snobbery…

    How dare someone question the wisdom of familial isolation?

    Sometimes you have to move to where the work is, not just sit at home and collect food stamps.

    Again, isolating people from family and community is not good. If your economic policies depend on people moving far from their families to get service jobs in big cities, there is something wrong with the policies.

    And there were.

    People who are far removed from family are more dependent on government assistance because their family isn’t around. And service industry jobs still use government assistance.

    Really? My ancestors came from Ireland. They moved because they needed to find a place where they could have opportunities. They had a lot tougher time of it than do modern Americans as no one gave them a welfare check.

    When coming to the US, members of different ethnic groups tended to group together also in the US. So, not a good comparison.

    So, you’re saying that a white guy in a dying Appalachian town, living on food stamps, can’t find other white guys to bond with in other places in the US that do have job opportunities?

    Not all white people are the same, as an Irish person should certainly understand.

    • #205
  26. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    And what caused people to move from Ireland and England to the states? Couldn’t have been economic policies leading to disasters, could it?

    Of course. The point is that they moved. You seem to think that moving to where there is opportunity is somehow too much to expect.

    Or maybe it’s about the point that it’s better to not destroy economies and jobs then tell people to move to where they’re easier to control.

    • #206
  27. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    One thing I can’t stand and I will always object to is the way so-called “conservatives” go after poor people. Stop it, guys. It’s sickening. If you’re having trouble making ends meet, do you really think “just move to a different city and get a new job” is such a simple thing do to? In this economy? Where the cost of housing is so far out of whack that the only people who could really afford to make such a move have no need to do so?

    Good lord, have a little compassion.

    It’s like the people who think as long as you have your “day in court” it doesn’t matter how oppressive the laws are, or how much it costs to defend yourself…

    • #207
  28. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

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    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    In the case of some people in my family, they ARE working in failing towns, living in houses they own outright but are worth little on the market. It’s a struggle but it’s where generations of family have lived their lives and where they wish to stay. If they moved to a place with a higher cost of living and better economy, they’d be far behind on the frictional losses, little or no better off economically, and certainly unhappy. None of them are druggies or on welfare but they are pretty much going to be living out their lives where they are.

    Williamson painted with a massively broad brush, and with malice.

    It doesn’t appear that the family members you describe are the ones Williamson was writing about, if they aren’t on welfare.

    He wrote that if you live in a declining town and don’t move, he wants you to die.

    I read that article, and granted, it was a while ago, but I don’t recall that being what he wrote. I remember the article suggesting that welfare benefits be applied to moving costs to help people access opportunities.

    How does getting help with moving costs work out if housing where you’re supposed to move to is unaffordable?

    • #208
  29. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

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    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    Snobbery…

    How dare someone question the wisdom of familial isolation?

    Sometimes you have to move to where the work is, not just sit at home and collect food stamps.

    Again, isolating people from family and community is not good. If your economic policies depend on people moving far from their families to get service jobs in big cities, there is something wrong with the policies.

    And there were.

    People who are far removed from family are more dependent on government assistance because their family isn’t around. And service industry jobs still use government assistance.

    Really? My ancestors came from Ireland. They moved because they needed to find a place where they could have opportunities. They had a lot tougher time of it than do modern Americans as no one gave them a welfare check.

    When coming to the US, members of different ethnic groups tended to group together also in the US. So, not a good comparison.

    So, you’re saying that a white guy in a dying Appalachian town, living on food stamps, can’t find other white guys to bond with in other places in the US that do have job opportunities?

    Not all white people are the same, as an Irish person should certainly understand.

    True enough, but still it ought to be possible to find community in this large and diverse country.

    • #209
  30. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    One thing I can’t stand and I will always object to is the way so-called “conservatives” go after poor people. Stop it, guys. It’s sickening. If you’re having trouble making ends meet, do you really think “just move to a different city and get a new job” is such a simple thing do to? In this economy? Where the cost of housing is so far out of whack that the only people who could really afford to make such a move have no need to do so?

    Good lord, have a little compassion.

    This has less to do with “going after the poor ” then it does with defending Williamson, who as I recall was suggesting that welfare benefits be restructured so that they could be applied to moving expenses. This only came up here because of the effort to disparage National Review and so I guess this Williamson column had to be attacked again….

    Also, welfare-type benefits are usually organized on a state or even county basis.  So if someone has to move to another county, or even another state, to find those sweet KW opportunities, having welfare pay for it might be problematic.

    • #210
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