Nothing Is Ever Going Back to Normal

 

National Review — after previously offering that Drag Queen Story Hour was a “blessing of liberty”  and railing against Florida Governor Ron de Santis for modest efforts at pushing back against the left — finds itself shocked… shockedat the metastasizing phenomenon of leftists foisting drag shows (featuring men strutting pretending to be women as if women were clown-prostitutes) on children. “Oh, my heck!” they proclaim. “Who could have foreseen that if we indulged the left in their depravity they would push it even further?

It’s understandable why (Bush) Republicans and (Atlantic) Conservatives would prefer not to fight the culture wars. It’s just not gentlemanly/ladylike to make a big fuss about leftists sexualizing children. It’s icky and Trumpy to confront the left about their cultural ambitions and their use of every lever of Government to promote them.  And because they don’t want to fight, it’s very easy to succumb to denialism. “Yes, sure, there are a few crazies on the fringe of the left, but most of them don’t want to get gay with kids. And if we just calmed down and found some common ground we could get back to normal. Hey, why are those people over there making those kids shove cash in that transvestite’s thong?”

In Defense of Political Escalation,” Abigail Shrier makes the eminently logical point that the left has no intention of ending the culture wars, or even a ceasefire.

Those waiting on the mythical pendulum to “swing back,” should stop holding their breath. The gender activists are True Believers, akin to jihadists: no amount of reasoning diminishes their resolve, no appeal to data brings them pause, no urge to consider the sanctity of American liberties will convince them to cool it.

While conservatives have been waiting for things to calm down and get back to normal, and fretting that “we oughtn’t do things that are at odds with our precious principles,” the left have seized not just Government power, but also academic power, media power, and even corporate power which they eagerly wield against anyone who dissents from Woke ideology.

If the woke continue to gain ground, where will we skeptics go to educate our children, transact commerce, find fair adjudication of our custody disputes? Where will we publish when not only the New York Times has a “gender director”—when every publication does?

That is the worry that likely motivates DeSantis, the first politician to “weaponize” the Florida tax code. He brought its hammer down on Disney to punish that one company for using its immense corporate coffers to lobby against parents’ rights in Florida. In principle, it’s a move I’m leery of. (And in the case of sending CPS after moms and dads who take their kids to drag shows, it’s a move I would oppose.)

But the gist of this stratagem—escalation—may be necessary. Indeed, it already seems to be working. Playing offense, even raising the stakes, may be the only means of achieving a much-needed truce. I’m out of better ideas. How about you?

Yeah, if there is another way to bring the culture back to plumb, I would be interested to hear it. But pundits writing hand-wringing articles in magazines that are only read by other pundits doesn’t seem like an effective solution to me.

And it’s not just the gender bending. The left will never give up on CRT. They will never give up on Climate Totalitarianism. They will never, despite John Cornyn’s delusions,  give up on zero-tolerance gun control.

They don’t want to make a deal; they want our complete submission.

Published in Culture
This post was promoted to the Main Feed by a Ricochet Editor at the recommendation of Ricochet members. Like this post? Want to comment? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

There are 295 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Stina (View Comment):

    This is what I’m talking about. The NR readers think the only legitimate argument to dying towns is they need to move or die.

    The economic policy discussion isn’t allowed by them. They are going to double and triple down on their views and refuse to even consider that maybe the economic policies are contributory and while moving is a part of life, maybe we could look into seeing if our policies are making that movement a social disaster and not just a normal part of life.

    Conservatism, Inc. refuses to acknowledge their own part in this economic disaster.

     

    • #151
  2. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    HeavyWater (View Comment):

    When the Left criticized the Florida legislation, calling it, inaccurately, the “Don’t say gay” bill, National Review defended the Florida legislation.  

    But David French apparently didn’t?  And that was criticism directed at French, from what I remember in previous comments, not at NR.

     

    The reality is that Trump did donate lots of money to Chuch Schumer, Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi.  

    You can’t be honest and call those donations Trump made “conservative.”  

    That would qualify as “protection money/payoffs.”  Microsoft and Apple wound up learning that lesson too, eventually.

    • #152
  3. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

     

    He also thinks it is a state’s right to decide.

     

    Completely the opposite: Trump emphatically did NOT support the state of North Carolina, he supported the idea that guys who call themselves gals should be allowed to use the women’s bathroom. That’s far more egregious in my mind, and corrosive to the culture, then David French supporting the First Amendment.

    Disney does not have a First Amendment right to preferential treatment in perpetuity.

    • #153
  4. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    HeavyWater (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Concretevol (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    Snobbery…

    How dare someone question the wisdom of familial isolation?

    Sometimes you have to move to where the work is, not just sit at home and collect food stamps.

    Or, how about not electing leftists who set up policies to destroy local jobs?

    • #154
  5. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Jager (View Comment):

    Pale things can be possible at the same time. Trump could have behaved better on Jan, 6th, it may be time for Trump to step aside for someone like Desantis and the Jan 6th Committee is an improperly formed group that exists only for political theater not to find the “truth” NR doesn’t do itself favors by publishing the position that this is a real committee and that its findings matter (either to finding the truth or to voters).

     

    If you listen to the podcast, you will find that there is plenty of criticism of the committee, and for reasons that you and I would likely agree with. That doesn’t mean that there is no information coming out of there that is useful to our understanding of what happened and Trump’s role in it. 

    • #155
  6. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Concretevol (View Comment):
    I feel like I just read a page from Daily Kos.

    Ah, once again I see the deployment of this lazy slur. If you disagree with the Trump-haters, you’re a far-leftist.

    Boring. Bored now.

    I’ll see about making a gif.

     

    • #156
  7. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Jager (View Comment):

    Goody for Liz Cheney she is really sticking it to Trump on her way to an embarrassing loss of her own seat. She represents Wyoming, the people there wish she would spend time on the issues that matter them, not her personal crusade.

    I think she is out of touch with what the voters of Wyoming want, and I agree with you that she is following her personal agenda. They will respond by throwing her out of office.

    • #157
  8. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Stina (View Comment):

     

    You don’t see it, but I did. They don’t like so-cons and they write mealy mouthed “conservative case for progressive cause du jour” stuff. If they stopped that, good for them. I used to read them 2-3 times a week. That’s what I got out of them. I liked French’s absolutist position on the 2A, but I think even he has moderated away from that.

    I am not a free trader. I’m a nationalist. They hate my views. They do not support it. That’s all there is to it.

    National Review doesn’t like social conservatives?! That is so ludicrous, so false, and simply shows that you aren’t familiar with the actual content of the magazine. Do your credibility a favor and actually spend some time familiarizing yourself with the topic you’re writing about.

    • #158
  9. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Stina (View Comment):

    It isn’t just that they don’t support my views. It’s that I’m an ignorant, white supremacist hick who voted for a man with no policy positions because I’m stupid.

    That is the line. And it’s why I’m not big on you, either. It’s the idea that people who had no reservations about voting for Trump in the 2016 primaries must have been personality cult worshipers. That attitude came from there. It’s prevalence on Ricochet in 2015-2020 came from NR. The drink bleach, Covington kids, Nazis = good people – all of that was regurgitated by NR writers.

    Understand this – I’m not ashamed of my political views or the beliefs that formed them. I’m not ashamed of my vote for Trump. And it was not worship, but voting for the only man on the playing field that even attempted to articulate my own views. NR loses because they think those policies are worthless.

    But National Review doesn’t think all of Trump’s policies were worthless. There’s a range of opinions on Trump and his policies because there are writers with different viewpoints. But they don’t worship him. 

    • #159
  10. DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    But National Review doesn’t think all of Trump’s policies were worthless. There’s a range of opinions on Trump and his policies because there are writers with different viewpoints. But they don’t worship him. 

    I keep asking you to stop with this language, and you don’t. I assume it’s because you think it’s a clever put-down. It’s not clever, and it makes you look nasty.

    • #160
  11. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

     

    You don’t see it, but I did. They don’t like so-cons and they write mealy mouthed “conservative case for progressive cause du jour” stuff. If they stopped that, good for them. I used to read them 2-3 times a week. That’s what I got out of them. I liked French’s absolutist position on the 2A, but I think even he has moderated away from that.

    I am not a free trader. I’m a nationalist. They hate my views. They do not support it. That’s all there is to it.

    National Review doesn’t like social conservatives?! That is so ludicrous, so false, and simply shows that you aren’t familiar with the actual content of the magazine. Do your credibility a favor and actually spend some time familiarizing yourself with the topic you’re writing about.

    I DID read them. This isn’t the hill to die on. It never was, it never is, it never will be.

    I gave them a shot. I wasn’t impressed.

    • #161
  12. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    But National Review doesn’t think all of Trump’s policies were worthless. There’s a range of opinions on Trump and his policies because there are writers with different viewpoints. But they don’t worship him.

    I keep asking you to stop with this language, and you don’t. I assume it’s because you think it’s a clever put-down. It’s not clever, and it makes you look nasty.

    Also, a number of “conservative” pundits/writers flipped their positions when they found out that Trump supported what they claimed to believe.

    • #162
  13. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Stina (View Comment):

    HeavyWater (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Concretevol (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    Snobbery…

    How dare someone question the wisdom of familial isolation?

    Sometimes you have to move to where the work is, not just sit at home and collect food stamps.

    Again, isolating people from family and community is not good. If your economic policies depend on people moving far from their families to get service jobs in big cities, there is something wrong with the policies.

    And there were.

    People who are far removed from family are more dependent on government assistance because their family isn’t around. And service industry jobs still use government assistance.

    Really? My ancestors came from Ireland. They moved because they needed to find a place where they could have opportunities. They had a lot tougher time of it than do modern Americans as no one gave them a welfare check. 

    • #163
  14. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    HeavyWater (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Concretevol (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    Snobbery…

    How dare someone question the wisdom of familial isolation?

    Sometimes you have to move to where the work is, not just sit at home and collect food stamps.

    Again, isolating people from family and community is not good. If your economic policies depend on people moving far from their families to get service jobs in big cities, there is something wrong with the policies.

    And there were.

    People who are far removed from family are more dependent on government assistance because their family isn’t around. And service industry jobs still use government assistance.

    Really? My ancestors came from Ireland. They moved because they needed to find a place where they could have opportunities. They had a lot tougher time of it than do modern Americans as no one gave them a welfare check.

    When coming to the US, members of different ethnic groups tended to group together also in the US.  So, not a good comparison.

    • #164
  15. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    It isn’t just that they don’t support my views. It’s that I’m an ignorant, white supremacist hick who voted for a man with no policy positions because I’m stupid.

    That is the line. And it’s why I’m not big on you, either. It’s the idea that people who had no reservations about voting for Trump in the 2016 primaries must have been personality cult worshipers. That attitude came from there. It’s prevalence on Ricochet in 2015-2020 came from NR. The drink bleach, Covington kids, Nazis = good people – all of that was regurgitated by NR writers.

    Understand this – I’m not ashamed of my political views or the beliefs that formed them. I’m not ashamed of my vote for Trump. And it was not worship, but voting for the only man on the playing field that even attempted to articulate my own views. NR loses because they think those policies are worthless.

    But National Review doesn’t think all of Trump’s policies were worthless. There’s a range of opinions on Trump and his policies because there are writers with different viewpoints. But they don’t worship him.

    They didn’t believe Trump HAD policies.

    • #165
  16. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    I’m certainly not ashamed of my vote for President Trump. I’m shocked that Ricochet’s Biden voters are okay with what he’s done to this country. Perhaps they blame President Trump . . . somehow . . . for what Biden’s done.

    But I wasn’t ashamed at any time between 2016 and 2020 either, no matter how many times Ricochet’s Biden voters declared that I was racist for voting for Trump, some kind of cult member for voting for Trump, anti-intellectual for voting for Trump, a red-neck savage from flyover country for voting for Trump, a drug-addicted welfare recipient for voting for Trump, or whatever new slur they could come up with because they decided they were so much better than I was because they knew better than to vote for the awful Orange Man. One infamous Ricochet member insisted that Ricochet’s Trump voters must all apologize for their votes.

    I know who should be ashamed of their votes, and it’s not me.

    I voted for Trump in 2020. Personally, I think people who voted for Biden should be embarassed. Ashamed? That seems a bit much – people have their reasons – but I think some embarassment at least is in order.

    • #166
  17. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    HeavyWater (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Concretevol (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    Snobbery…

    How dare someone question the wisdom of familial isolation?

    Sometimes you have to move to where the work is, not just sit at home and collect food stamps.

    Again, isolating people from family and community is not good. If your economic policies depend on people moving far from their families to get service jobs in big cities, there is something wrong with the policies.

    And there were.

    People who are far removed from family are more dependent on government assistance because their family isn’t around. And service industry jobs still use government assistance.

    Really? My ancestors came from Ireland. They moved because they needed to find a place where they could have opportunities. They had a lot tougher time of it than do modern Americans as no one gave them a welfare check.

    They relied on churches and missions, instead!

    • #167
  18. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    I’m certainly not ashamed of my vote for President Trump. I’m shocked that Ricochet’s Biden voters are okay with what he’s done to this country. Perhaps they blame President Trump . . . somehow . . . for what Biden’s done.

    But I wasn’t ashamed at any time between 2016 and 2020 either, no matter how many times Ricochet’s Biden voters declared that I was racist for voting for Trump, some kind of cult member for voting for Trump, anti-intellectual for voting for Trump, a red-neck savage from flyover country for voting for Trump, a drug-addicted welfare recipient for voting for Trump, or whatever new slur they could come up with because they decided they were so much better than I was because they knew better than to vote for the awful Orange Man. One infamous Ricochet member insisted that Ricochet’s Trump voters must all apologize for their votes.

    I know who should be ashamed of their votes, and it’s not me.

    I voted for Trump in 2020. Personally, I think people who voted for Biden should be embarassed. Ashamed? That seems a bit much – people have their reasons – but I think some embarassment at least is in order.

    Seems like the only reason to not be ashamed of voting for Biden would be if they didn’t know how awful a person he was.  But to be a grown-up supposedly intelligent person and NOT know that, is also something to be ashamed of.

    • #168
  19. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Stina (View Comment):

    This is what I’m talking about. The NR readers think the only legitimate argument to dying towns is they need to move or die.

    The economic policy discussion isn’t allowed by them. They are going to double and triple down on their views and refuse to even consider that maybe the economic policies are contributory and while moving is a part of life, maybe we could look into seeing if our policies are making that movement a social disaster and not just a normal part of life.

    What do you mean policy discussion isn’t allowed by NR readers? Isn’t this a discussion? You don’t seem to understand that people can disagree with you and yet still be largely on your side of the political divide.

    • #169
  20. DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    That’s at least twice now where participants in this thread have used welfare recipient as a slur. Attacking poor people is really not a good look, guys.

    • #170
  21. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    And what caused people to move from Ireland and England to the states? Couldn’t have been economic policies leading to disasters, could it?

    • #171
  22. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):

    HeavyWater (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

     

    Second, Trump’s views on homosexuality are well known and were tolerated for his positions on OTHER things –

     

    I never said anything about Trump’s views on homosexuality. I mentioned his support of the LGBTQ position that dudes should be allowed in women’s bathrooms. That’s not a homosexual issue.

    Trump’s views on allowing dudes in women’s bathrooms is pretty radical left. The Republicans of North Carolina were trying to give women privacy in women’s bathrooms and some corporations threatened boycotts of North Carolina. Trump sided with the corporations threatening to boycott North Carolina.

    I have to agree that Trump was very disappointing on issues of sodomy and other abominations, and on straight sexual morality, too. He was pretty strong on abortion. Other than that, I thought that he was weak on social issues.

    The third-of-a-loaf or so that we got from Trump was better than social conservatives did with prior Republican Presidents.

    In hindsight, I find G. W. Bush to have been the worst. I remember being upset about it, at the time, when he opposed same-sex marriage but supported civil unions. He was willing to concede everything but the word marriage. I’m not sure, but back in the early-to-mid-2000s, there might have been the political will to stop that sodomite agenda, if we’d had a Republican leader willing to take on the issue.

    I think it would have taken more than a strong president willing to take on the gay marriage argument to win that battle, I’m afraid. The battle was lost when public education stopped teaching critical thinking, and the teaching profession as a whole taken over by progressives.

    • #172
  23. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

     

    He also thinks it is a state’s right to decide.

     

    Completely the opposite: Trump emphatically did NOT support the state of North Carolina, he supported the idea that guys who call themselves gals should be allowed to use the women’s bathroom. That’s far more egregious in my mind, and corrosive to the culture, then David French supporting the First Amendment.

    Disney does not have a First Amendment right to preferential treatment in perpetuity.

    I agree. I just think the special district status was beneficial to the residents of the area. I could have wished for some other way to punish Disney.

    • #173
  24. Stina Member
    Stina
    @CM

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    This is what I’m talking about. The NR readers think the only legitimate argument to dying towns is they need to move or die.

    The economic policy discussion isn’t allowed by them. They are going to double and triple down on their views and refuse to even consider that maybe the economic policies are contributory and while moving is a part of life, maybe we could look into seeing if our policies are making that movement a social disaster and not just a normal part of life.

    What do you mean policy discussion isn’t allowed by NR readers? Isn’t this a discussion? You don’t seem to understand that people can disagree with you and yet still be largely on your side of the political divide.

    When the response to KW is “tell me where he hurt you” and “they should move or die”, conversation and discussion isn’t actually what they are interested in. Con is a die hard free trader. So is HW. To get them to even have an open discussion would be pulling teeth from an Indo Raptor.

    • #174
  25. Jager Coolidge
    Jager
    @Jager

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Jager (View Comment):

    Pale things can be possible at the same time. Trump could have behaved better on Jan, 6th, it may be time for Trump to step aside for someone like Desantis and the Jan 6th Committee is an improperly formed group that exists only for political theater not to find the “truth” NR doesn’t do itself favors by publishing the position that this is a real committee and that its findings matter (either to finding the truth or to voters).

     

    If you listen to the podcast, you will find that there is plenty of criticism of the committee, and for reasons that you and I would likely agree with. That doesn’t mean that there is no information coming out of there that is useful to our understanding of what happened and Trump’s role in it.

    Maybe. I simply don’t find the actions of this Committee to be credible.  I am completely on board with the idea that Trump could have handled things better on Jan 6.  I don’t really think he created a riot or tried to overthrow the Government. 

    The Committee simply does not function as a real Congressional Committee. It is a partisan “get Trump” Committee. So when they put out information to “get Trump” I am not surprised and have no idea how to separate to spin from the truth. An actual Republican presence on the Committee might help us find the truth and create a credible finding. 

    I am not really on board Trump 2024 but nothing that this Committee says will push me in either direction. Just like nothing MSNBC or Mother Jones says will move me to support or not support Trump. 

    • #175
  26. Headedwest Inactive
    Headedwest
    @Headedwest

    HeavyWater (View Comment):

    The reality is that Trump did donate lots of money to Chuch Schumer, Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi.

    You can’t be honest and call those donations Trump made “conservative.”

    You probably could call the donations to Schumer “the cost of doing business in New York State”.

    • #176
  27. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    But National Review doesn’t think all of Trump’s policies were worthless. There’s a range of opinions on Trump and his policies because there are writers with different viewpoints. But they don’t worship him.

    I keep asking you to stop with this language, and you don’t. I assume it’s because you think it’s a clever put-down. It’s not clever, and it makes you look nasty.

    I use the language because that’s what it looks like to me – it reminds me very much of the adulation the progressives had for Obama. I am uncomfortable, as an American, with this adulation that seemingly can’t bear criticism of the Messiah at hand, whether Obama or Trump. At its best, it’s a cult of personality. At its worst, it has religious-like aspects to it and so “worship” is as good a term as any.

    • #177
  28. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    HeavyWater (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Concretevol (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    Snobbery…

    How dare someone question the wisdom of familial isolation?

    Sometimes you have to move to where the work is, not just sit at home and collect food stamps.

    Again, isolating people from family and community is not good. If your economic policies depend on people moving far from their families to get service jobs in big cities, there is something wrong with the policies.

    And there were.

    People who are far removed from family are more dependent on government assistance because their family isn’t around. And service industry jobs still use government assistance.

    Really? My ancestors came from Ireland. They moved because they needed to find a place where they could have opportunities. They had a lot tougher time of it than do modern Americans as no one gave them a welfare check.

    They relied on churches and missions, instead!

    And especially on Irish (or whatever their group was) people who had come before.

    • #178
  29. kedavis Inactive
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

     

    He also thinks it is a state’s right to decide.

     

    Completely the opposite: Trump emphatically did NOT support the state of North Carolina, he supported the idea that guys who call themselves gals should be allowed to use the women’s bathroom. That’s far more egregious in my mind, and corrosive to the culture, then David French supporting the First Amendment.

    Disney does not have a First Amendment right to preferential treatment in perpetuity.

    I agree. I just think the special district status was beneficial to the residents of the area. I could have wished for some other way to punish Disney.

    If Disney tax money is now spread out beyond just the immediate Disney properties, the residents of the area might benefit even more.

    • #179
  30. Painter Jean Moderator
    Painter Jean
    @PainterJean

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    HeavyWater (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Concretevol (View Comment):

    Stina (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Painter Jean (View Comment):
    There’s something else going on here, an undercurrent of anti-snobbery snobbery: . . .

    Did you just . . . advocate for snobbery?

     

    No, quite the opposite. I often hear, in criticisms of National Review, that they’re somehow posh and snobby, but I don’t know where that comes from other than the kind of snobbery that thinks that those who use reason and write well are snobs.

    people who don’t move deserve to die?

    Awwww, did Kevin Williamson hurt your feels? How dare someone suggest people go to where the jobs are instead of waiting for government handouts……..

    Snobbery…

    How dare someone question the wisdom of familial isolation?

    Sometimes you have to move to where the work is, not just sit at home and collect food stamps.

    Again, isolating people from family and community is not good. If your economic policies depend on people moving far from their families to get service jobs in big cities, there is something wrong with the policies.

    And there were.

    People who are far removed from family are more dependent on government assistance because their family isn’t around. And service industry jobs still use government assistance.

    Really? My ancestors came from Ireland. They moved because they needed to find a place where they could have opportunities. They had a lot tougher time of it than do modern Americans as no one gave them a welfare check.

    When coming to the US, members of different ethnic groups tended to group together also in the US. So, not a good comparison.

    So, you’re saying that a white guy in a dying Appalachian town, living on food stamps, can’t find other white guys to bond with in other places in the US that do have job opportunities? 

    • #180
Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.