Member Post

 

It turns out that I have some fans of Wagner among the readers of my posts, and I had some interest in my last post about Das Rheingold. In that post, I teased something about Die Walkure, and I thought I ought to follow through here. This is mostly about my opinions regarding augenmusik, but […]

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Quote of the Day: Leftists are Prisoners of Their Own Ideas

 

Men are qualified for civil liberty, in exact proportion to their disposition to put moral chains upon their own appetites. Society cannot exist, unless a controlling power upon will and appetite be placed somewhere, and the less of it there is within, the more there must be without. It is ordained in the eternal constitution of things, that men of intemperate minds cannot be free. Their passions forge their fetters. –Edmund Burke

Edmund Burke foretold the disaster that would become the radical political Left in the United States. The Left is disdainful of the morality to which many of us subscribe. They are weak and greedy and are therefore doomed to failure, because they don’t value the most honorable aspects of human nature: generosity, trust, respect and many other attributes that those on the Right have come to appreciate and venerate.

Byron York is in for Jim Geraghty today.  Byron and Greg cheer Mississippi’s attorney general for telling the Supreme Court there is no constitutional right to an abortion. They also react to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi rejecting certain Republicans from the January 6th commission by pointing out the radical lefties she has named to the panel. And they have some choice words for the Biden administration after learning that Hunter Biden will be meeting prospective buyers of his ridiculously overpriced art when the transactions are supposed to be anonymous.

Alexandra Desanctis Marr is in for Jim today.  Alexandra and Greg cheer Senate Republicans for blocking the Democrats’ very expensive “infrastructure” bill, which doesn’t even exist yet. They also slam House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for further politicizing the committee tasked with investigating the Capitol Hill riot by rejecting two GOP members. And they scratch their heads after President Biden’s latest town hall is filled with false statements and incoherent moments.

Abolitionist Teaching Network: Coming to a School Near You

 

Have you heard about the latest partnership between the federal government and the Abolitionist Teaching Network? If not, I’m not surprised; you weren’t supposed to hear about it, since the Biden administration has been contracting with the ATN with      no announcement or fanfare. The reason? They don’t want you to know that they’ve created this alliance to intensify and increase the indoctrination of Critical Race Theory, not only for children, but for the teachers, too.

What does this alliance look like? The funding has already been allocated:

This week on JobMakers, Host Denzil Mohammed talks with Anita Worden, renewable energy business entrepreneur, about her work to improve representation of women in crucial economic sectors like technology, a place where they can innovate and have real impact.  Anita was born in England of Indian parents, grew up in Algeria, moved to the U.S. as a teenager, and attended MIT. While still a student, she co-founded her first company, Solectria Corporation, in 1989, and then went on to found Solectria Renewables in 2005, both of which were acquired.  Now retired, Anita is working to promote tech as a viable, lucrative and satisfying career choice for women and girls, just as she’s educating Americans about her passions, climate change and shifting the narrative around immigrants in the U.S.

Guest:

Ayaan speaks with Nicholas Kristof about human rights abuses against women and girls around the world. They discuss his recent article, “A 14-Year-Old Bride, Wed to Her Rapist, Playing on a Jungle Gym,” and dive into the subjects of child marriage, forced marriage, and female genital mutilation.

Nicholas Kristof has been a columnist for the New York Times since 2001. He graduated from Harvard, studied law at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, and then studied Arabic in Cairo. He has won two Pulitzer Prizes for his coverage of Tiananmen Square and of the genocide in Darfur, along with many humanitarian awards such as the Anne Frank Award and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize.

Member Post

 

I’ve never understood the big desire for flying cars. Cars have been able to fly for a very long time. The car sitting in your driveway can fly. There are two problems with the flying car you already own. The first is the flight time is very short. The second is the landings are a […]

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Member Post

 

On a thread today I had occasion to make reference to a golf tournament that JY plays in every year, organized by one of his UCLA buddies. JY was invited for years and demurred; the kids were young, money was tight. Finally, in 1999 he was cajoled (mostly by me) to participate. By the looks […]

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Byron York is in for Jim. Today, Greg and Byron are glad to see New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo losing some of his longtime donors. They also react to a Buzzfeed story about the FBI’s infiltrating militia groups in Michigan leading up to the kidnapping plot against Gov. Gretchen Whitmer. But did the FBI only foil the plot or did it push militia members to pursue the idea in the first place? And they reveal how congressional Democrats are planning to pursue an amnesty policy through the massive spending bill they hope to pass this year.

Member Post

 

A digression: It is a point of some sadness to me that I cannot read Latin or Greek, but I can read a music score, a pleasure that should be available to all and unfortunately isn’t. My inner ear is not good enough to hear a score at sight, but I can follow along with […]

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-host Cara Candal and guest co-host Derrell Bradford talk with Mariam Memarsadeghi, senior fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute. Mariam shares remembrances from her early years spent in the Shah’s Iran, and emigration to the U.S. shortly after Ayatollah Khomeini’s revolution in 1979. They discuss the massive cultural and civic differences between the Islamic Republic of Iran, with its government controlled by religious leaders, and modern liberal democracies like the U.S., with constitutionally limited government, and how this difference is manifested in the treatment of women and political dissidents. Mariam describes Tavaana, an organization she co-founded that is dedicated to a free and open Iran, and how it is using the internet and other means to advance democracy, civic education, and women’s rights in Iran. They also discuss her involvement with “We the People”: The Citizen and the Constitution, a nationwide civics contest for American high school students that is run by the Center for Civic Education. She descibes her experiences as a Presidential Leadership Scholar, and one of 43 individuals chosen as a portrait subject for President George W. Bush’s April 2021 book, Out of Many, One: Portraits of America’s Immigrants.

Stories of the Week: From Texas, California and Colorado to Tennessee and Georgia, school districts are using some federal stimulus funding to award “thank you” bonuses to teachers to prevent resignations and boost morale after COVID-19. In New Jersey, one of nine states that have mandated in-person learning, some parents are raising concerns about the poor condition of the schools their children are being forced to return to.