Latest Slur Against the Right: Replacement Theory

 

When I read the jumble of definitions that were supposed to define “replacement theory,” I became extremely skeptical of its credibility and validity. Yet a part of me, given the current chaotic climate in this country, was reluctant to discard it out of hand and assume it wasn’t important, for a number of reasons.

First, replacement theory is a mish-mash of theories that the Left has chosen to lump together, a kind of everything-but-the-kitchen-sink approach. The problem with this “theory” is that the Left can conveniently modify it to suit their needs and use it to attack others. For example, one broad definition is:

At the extremes of American life, replacement theory — the notion that Western elites, sometimes manipulated by Jews, want to ‘replace’ and disempower white Americans — has become an engine of racist terror, helping inspire a wave of mass shootings in recent years and fueling the 2017 right-wing rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, that erupted in violence.

Please note that the only people guilty of espousing this definition are “white Americans” at the extremes, and that Jews are conspiring with the elites.

But in the same article, these radical ideas are identified everywhere:

But replacement theory, once confined to the digital fever swamps of Reddit message boards and semi-obscure white nationalist sites, has gone mainstream. In sometimes more muted forms, the fear it crystallizes — of a future America in which white people are no longer the numerical majority — has become a potent force in conservative media and politics, where the theory has been borrowed and remixed to attract audiences, retweets and small-dollar donations.

In this definition, the conservative Right is conspiring with the white supremacists out of fear of losing their positions in society.

Finally, the Republican Party is targeted as espousing replacement theory:

Yet in recent months, versions of the same ideas, sanded down and shorn of explicitly anti-Black and antisemitic themes, have become commonplace in the Republican Party — spoken aloud at congressional hearings, echoed in Republican campaign advertisements, and increasingly embraced by right-wing candidates and media personalities.

Tucker Carlson on Fox has been targeted regarding replacement theory, even though he rejects the term; he does, however, point out that the Democrats have openly declared in the past that increasing the ranks of the Hispanic population will likely increase their electoral base, although evidence to the contrary is now emerging. I doubt that the Left appreciates being reminded of its arrogance.

And now Liz Cheney is “eating her own”  (so to speak):

‘The House GOP leadership has enabled white nationalism, white supremacy, and anti-Semitism. History has taught us that what begins with words ends in far worse. @GOP leaders must renounce and reject these views and those who hold them,’ Cheney said in a tweet.

Although many Conservatives don’t take her seriously, the political Left probably agrees with her and uses her diatribes to discount us.

Do those of us on the political Right have reasons to be concerned? After years of being accused of being systemic racists, Nazis and anti-Semites, is replacement theory just another troll?

I believe that at some point we have to call out the Left for their smears, repeatedly, resolutely, and every time we are in front of a camera. We are looking at the worst possible attacks by a group that is incapable of recognizing its own bigotry, hatred and actions. After all, the Left, given how they condescend to the blacks in this country, demonstrate systemic racism. They demonstrate their willingness to make baseless accusations to prop up their narrative, such as Nazi attributions we heard from Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez likening the detention facilities to concentration camps. And her cohorts have made anti-Semitic remarks and were reprimanded with a pointless House response.

As an American, a Conservative, and a Jew I can no longer sit back and disregard these attacks as annoying but harmless. Separately, these diatribes might be brushed away, but cumulatively they are being used more frequently and with abandon. At some point, our half-hearted protests and complaining will strengthen their false narratives. And we will have lost any advantage and credibility to call them out.

What will we do then?

What can we do now?

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  1. DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Is it still a right-wing conspiracy theory when Biden talks about it?

    Democrats loved the idea once upon a time. But don’t you dare suggest they were serious about it. 

    • #1
  2. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Who cares whether the majority is blue, yellow, magenta or green?? What difference, at this point, does it make??

    • #2
  3. DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    What I care about is that America is populated by people who understand what American culture is and want to be a part of it. There’s been too much effort in the past few decades to say that immigrants don’t need to assimilate into our culture but can sort of remain “separate but equal,” . . . (which has now gone to such an extreme that segregation is making a comeback).

    So I don’t care what Americans look like as long as they’re Americans.

    • #3
  4. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    What I care about is that America is populated by people who understand what American culture is and want to be a part of it. There’s been too much effort in the past few decades to say that immigrants don’t need to assimilate into our culture but can sort of remain “separate but equal,” . . . (which has now gone to such an extreme that segregation is making a comeback).

    So I don’t care what Americans look like as long as they’re Americans.

    When I first heard that black college students wanted separate facilities and dorms, my heart broke. And I was angry. The Left convinced them of the white bogeyman that supposedly rejected them, instead of pointing out how far we’ve come. Deep in my heart I still keep hoping that with all the stupidity coming out of the Left, ordinary people will recognize how they’ve been deceived. And how far we’ve come.

    • #4
  5. Illiniguy Member
    Illiniguy
    @Illiniguy

    We live in a world where everyone has a microphone, but that doesn’t mean that they have anything to say.

    • #5
  6. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Illiniguy (View Comment):

    We live in a world where everyone has a microphone, but that doesn’t mean that they have anything to say.

    And those who have nothing meaningful to say are the loudest!

    • #6
  7. Hoyacon Member
    Hoyacon
    @Hoyacon

    Let’s consider the ubiquitous concept known as “ diversity.”  At root and in practice, it is based on a theory of replacement.  

    • #7
  8. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    Eventually we are all replaced. The only question is how the new folks want to live compared to the old folks.

    • #8
  9. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    Let’s consider the ubiquitous concept known as “ diversity.” At root and in practice, it is based on a theory of replacement.

    As long as we’re not trying to replace them . . . 

    • #9
  10. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Rodin (View Comment):
    The only question is how the new folks want to live compared to the old folks.

    Indeed. In freedom or in chains . . . 

    • #10
  11. Mad Gerald Coolidge
    Mad Gerald
    @Jose

    As Steven Hayward points out on Powerline, where could the right have found such as preposterous idea?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Powerline

    • #11
  12. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Mad Gerald (View Comment):

    As Steven Hayward points out on Powerline, where could the right have found such as preposterous idea?

     

    No kidding! A question has just come up for me, though: after reading Hayward’s efforts to ridicule the Left, is that the best tack for us to take, given they do the same thing over and over again, or should we be calling them out? I tend to think at this stage that they will ignore the ridicule. What do you think?

    • #12
  13. Mad Gerald Coolidge
    Mad Gerald
    @Jose

    I don’t know if there is a good answer, and I believe in honest debate, but I lean strongly towards ridicule.

    As this article about disinformation in the WSJ shows, arguing in good faith is easily be dismissed by the left..

    No politician deployed the rhetoric of technocratic postpartisanship more openly than Mr. Obama. In a 2007 speech to Google employees, early in his campaign for president, he expressed it concisely. “The American people at their core are a decent people,” he allowed. “There’s a generosity of spirit there, and there’s common sense there.” You could hear the “but” coming. “But,” he said, “it’s not tapped.”

    He continued: “Mainly people—they’re just misinformed, or they are too busy, they’re trying to get their kids to school, they’re working, they just don’t have enough information, or they’re not professionals at sorting out all the information that’s out there, and so our political process gets skewed. But if you guys give them good information, their instincts are good and they will make good decisions. And the president has the bully pulpit to give them good information.”

    For him—and he shows no signs of change since he made those remarks 15 years ago—politics is a simple Manichaean struggle in which the righteous and well-intentioned use good data, and the malign and ignorant use bad. Mr. Obama’s most ardent admirers, accordingly—I think of the founders of the “explainer” site Vox.com—view themselves not as proponents of a particular ideological conviction but as disseminators of good data.

    • #13
  14. Mad Gerald Coolidge
    Mad Gerald
    @Jose

    I suppose if someone is willing to engage in honest debate it is worthwhile.  But if not, ridicule.

    • #14
  15. DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf Member
    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic Oaf
    @DrewInWisconsin

    Mad Gerald (View Comment):

    I suppose if someone is willing to engage in honest debate it is worthwhile. But if not, ridicule.

    I think ridicule is easily dismissed, too. They’re not afraid of looking ridiculous to the right. They’re afraid of looking ridiculous to their cohorts. And their cohorts won’t see the ridiculousness we see. They’ll just engage in stronger defense.

    • #15
  16. Vance Richards Member
    Vance Richards
    @VanceRichards

    So . . . which side is it that looks at people as groups, rather than as individuals? Which side thinks your votes are determined by your skin color, as in “You ain’t black . . . “?  

    • #16
  17. BDB Coolidge
    BDB
    @BDB

    There’s an awful undercurrent here which is being propagandized into the youth and other soft-headed folk.  Being white is bad.  

    This is sheer vengeance from a politically motivated minority of several demotypes.  And cowardice among whites, fueled by “white guilt”, makes it successful.  

    It’s okay to be white.  

    • #17
  18. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    BDB (View Comment):
    This is sheer vengeance from a politically motivated minority of several demotypes.  And cowardice among whites, fueled by “white guilt”, makes it successful.

    We have to wonder if those white supremacists have a legitimate beef, with their paranoic ideas . . .

    • #18
  19. BDB Coolidge
    BDB
    @BDB

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    BDB (View Comment):
    This is sheer vengeance from a politically motivated minority of several demotypes. And cowardice among whites, fueled by “white guilt”, makes it successful.

    We have to wonder if those white supremacists have a legitimate beef, with their paranoic ideas . . .

    Indeed.  “White Supremacists” has grown to cover ordinary people who feel proud of their culture and “group” accomplishments who also happen to be white.

    The real sin here is the invitation to hate non-whites, who mostly are just like us (majority of present company) and who also feel a sense of group pride.  THIS IS THE TRAP FOR WHITES.

    I’m white, and I am proud of what white people have accomplished, with caveats, and this should be the default position for everybody, white, black, yellow, red (and brown, which in evo bio terms is included in white, but in cultural terms often is distinct).  Yet only whites are encouraged (to put it gently) to examine those caveats, whereas other groups are assured that they are without sin, which is patently silly.

    I view the whole thing as a sophisticated Alinskyite strategy to push whites into hatred of non-whites by recruiting non-whites to call us haters — becoming a useful (for the offense) self-fulfilling damnation.

    So here the whites are ont he defense against not the black and browns, but against the satanic (if you’ll allow me the term) whites who use blacks and browns for political goals.

    Blacks are more conservative than whites, but face far greater social pressure to identify with the political left.  THIS IS THE TRAP FOR NON-WHITES.

    Anyway.  I like your post.

     

    • #19
  20. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    BDB (View Comment):
    Blacks are more conservative than whites, but face far greater social pressure to identify with the political left.  THIS IS THE TRAP FOR NON-WHITES.

    Thanks. This is all so bizarre that I have to practically twist my brain into a pretzel to make any sense of it! Again, I have dreams that the non-whites will wake up one day and say, wait, what?? and begin a different conversation. I can dream, can’t I?

    • #20
  21. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    “You may not have heard of the Lorem Ipsum principle but rest assured Republicans are talking about it openly and behind closed doors. This principle means hate, hatey-hate, and ultrahate for those who can least afford it – the vulnerable, but also you personally. Please help us fight the brazen efforts to at the Lorem Ipsumation of the nation by convincing yourselves and others of the utter perfidy of every single Ipsumist (Republican). And remember, only we can save you.” 

     

    • #21
  22. Mad Gerald Coolidge
    Mad Gerald
    @Jose

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    Mad Gerald (View Comment):

    I suppose if someone is willing to engage in honest debate it is worthwhile. But if not, ridicule.

    I think ridicule is easily dismissed, too.

    Yes, but ridicule can make inroads.  I submit The Greg Gutfeld show which is surpassing all the liberal late night shows. 

     

    • #22
  23. Buckpasser Member
    Buckpasser
    @Buckpasser

    DrewInWisconsin, Unapologetic … (View Comment):

    What I care about is that America is populated by people who understand what American culture is and want to be a part of it. There’s been too much effort in the past few decades to say that immigrants don’t need to assimilate into our culture but can sort of remain “separate but equal,” . . . (which has now gone to such an extreme that segregation is making a comeback).

    So I don’t care what Americans look like as long as they’re Americans.

    Multi-racial not multi-cultural.

    • #23
  24. Hoyacon Member
    Hoyacon
    @Hoyacon

    TBA (View Comment):

    “You may not have heard of the Lorem Ipsum principle but rest assured Republicans are talking about it openly and behind closed doors. This principle means hate, hatey-hate, and ultrahate for those who can least afford it – the vulnerable, but also you personally. Please help us fight the brazen efforts to at the Lorem Ipsumation of the nation by convincing yourselves and others of the utter perfidy of every single Ipsumist (Republican). And remember, only we can save you.”

    The what?  How come we’re not talking about it openly?

    This reminds me of QAnon in that the left is always talking about it and knows more about it than I do.

    • #24
  25. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    If there was any replacement theory I’d support, it would be to replace leftist brains with ones endowed with critical thinking skills.  Maybe then at least some of them would see the folly in their policies.  The only problem is that even critical thinking sometimes cannot overcome cognitive dissonance . . .

    • #25
  26. TBA Coolidge
    TBA
    @RobtGilsdorf

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    TBA (View Comment):

    “You may not have heard of the Lorem Ipsum principle but rest assured Republicans are talking about it openly and behind closed doors. This principle means hate, hatey-hate, and ultrahate for those who can least afford it – the vulnerable, but also you personally. Please help us fight the brazen efforts to at the Lorem Ipsumation of the nation by convincing yourselves and others of the utter perfidy of every single Ipsumist (Republican). And remember, only we can save you.”

    The what? How come we’re not talking about it openly?

    This reminds me of QAnon in that the left is always talking about it and knows more about it than I do.

    Only an Ipsumist would claim he’s never heard of it. 

    • #26
  27. DonG (CAGW is a Hoax) Coolidge
    DonG (CAGW is a Hoax)
    @DonG

    Susan Quinn: What can we do now?

    Anytime someone on the Left says “replacement theory”, just accuse them of being antisemitic.  That will give them pause and allow you to distinguish the wacky conspiracy theory from the “demographics is destiny” mantra of the Left. 

    Is it fair to accuse someone of being antisemitic, when that is not their intention?   Sure, by Leftist rules of “no rules”.

    • #27
  28. BDB Coolidge
    BDB
    @BDB

    TBA (View Comment):

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    TBA (View Comment):

    “You may not have heard of the Lorem Ipsum principle but rest assured Republicans are talking about it openly and behind closed doors. This principle means hate, hatey-hate, and ultrahate for those who can least afford it – the vulnerable, but also you personally. Please help us fight the brazen efforts to at the Lorem Ipsumation of the nation by convincing yourselves and others of the utter perfidy of every single Ipsumist (Republican). And remember, only we can save you.”

    The what? How come we’re not talking about it openly?

    This reminds me of QAnon in that the left is always talking about it and knows more about it than I do.

    Only an Ipsumist would claim he’s never heard of it.

    Pretty good Lorem Ipsummary of the issue.

    • #28
  29. DonG (CAGW is a Hoax) Coolidge
    DonG (CAGW is a Hoax)
    @DonG

    Rodin (View Comment):

    Eventually we are all replaced. The only question is how the new folks want to live compared to the old folks.

    Exactly.  I am hoping that I am replaced by somebody that likes America as the leader for freedom, tolerance, and prosperity.  I think my odds are better with some Cuban immigrant than your average college graduate.

    • #29
  30. Hoyacon Member
    Hoyacon
    @Hoyacon

    Are The Replacements the official band of the Replacement Theory?  I’d be good with that.

    • #30
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