Tag: Racism

Eric Kaufmann joined host Ben Domenech to discuss his work within fields of research related to populism across the world and specifically in the United States. Kaufmann is a professor of politics at Birkbeck College at the University of London and is the author of “Whiteshift: Populism, Immigration, and the Future of White Majorities.”

Kaufmann argues that the new antiracism movement worldwide, but which is specifically dominant in American culture, is a form of secular religion. He refers to the modern American sentiment as the “third great awokening,” following the former waves in the late 60s and the 90s. It stems from the idea that tradition, both religious and national, ought to be eliminated to make room for the new religion of antiracism. It resembles many historical international movements, Kaufmann said.

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Fox News Senior Political Analyst Brit Hume joined host Ben Domenech to discuss race relations in America and how the issue has been politically manipulated by the left.

Hume argued that, since the nation reached an overwhelming consensus against racism, marked by the passage of the Civil Right Act, movements such as Black Lives Matter are capitalizing on that sentiment to usher in a new era with a different agenda. A movement that was once about tearing down barriers has switched to focus on tearing down statues.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Isiah Thomas Calls for End of ‘Race’ Category

 

An NBA program, carried on ESPN and intended to promote the left’s line on race, went a bit sideways. June 23 on NBA Game Time, Isiah Thomas, a basketball great with a master’s degree in education, called for an end to the use of race as an official classification, arguing that it has been misused for bad purposes from its origin. The young woman interviewing him had to smile through the interview, however much this was heresy in the present political moment. His comments accord more with the long time position of Alexander Hamilton III, a lawyer and American Family Radio daily talk show host. Contra Dennis Prager, the answer is not to be “colorblind.” Rather, we should learn from Deuteronomy 16:19, and not the “1619 Project.”

Isiah Thomas earned an education master’s degree at UC Berkeley in 2013. His study focused on the education and life outcomes for black male college athletes.* Instead of promoting the Democrat Party line, Thomas called for an end to the use of “race” as a classification label. He did so on the basis of theories and histories of “racialization,” the invention and development of this relatively new way of labeling and dividing people. Isiah Thomas noted that our government, starting at the national level, has four boxes: national origin, citizenship, ethnicity, and race. It is his position that race has been defined and used for ill purpose and should be eliminated from official programs. You get plenty of descriptive categorization from national origin, citizenship, and ethnicity.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. I Am Not Your Slave

 

The constant attacks on American citizens who are white are absurd and insulting. The commentary insisting that all whites must be racist is bizarre and on a closer look, based on no facts at all. I’ve decided that I’ve had enough of these intended insults. (I can only be insulted if I accept the observations.) I’m pushing back. I realize that some black Americans and people on the Left would be outraged at my ideas, and if they had the opportunity would vehemently chastise me.

I don’t care.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Seattle and King County Are Now Governed by…

 

CHOP. The anarchists and other assorted activists who are, with the positive assistance of the City of Seattle, occupying a portion of the city, now dominate the rest of the city. More manifestations of this dominance:

Washington State Patrol will keep closing I-5 for protests. I am on the WA State Dept of Transportation email list for truckers, and I am now getting multiple alerts daily about the freeway being closed. No reason given.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. What Will the Mob Do with Woodrow Wilson?

 

I’m fascinated by the defacing and destruction of statues and monuments around the world, but especially in the US. The mob seems focused largely (but obviously not exclusively) on those who served for the Confederacy during our “Great Unpleasantness.” After all, they are targets of our modern-day “Presentism,” that is, applying modern “morals” or “standards” to people and events from decades if not centuries ago. The complications and nuances of history don’t seem to matter.

But a few particular monuments seem exempt from the current “unpleasantness,” and that baffles me. Especially one particular former Governor of New Jersey, President of Princeton University, and President of the United States, Woodrow Wilson.

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Libby Emmons joins host Ben Domenech to discuss her son’s personal experience in the New York City public school system and how it pushes the left’s narrative of systemic racism and white privilege. Emmons is a senior editor at The Post Millennial and senior contributor at The Federalist.

Emmons argued that the public school curriculum accomplishes nothing in its teaching of white privilege other than discouraging children from hoping for change. Schools ought to promote ideas of kindness and equality rather than divide children by informing specific children of their inherent racism.

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Yesha Callahan (Essence Magazine) and Bridget bond over their shared fear of being trampled in a crowd, their mutual disdain for agents, and marvel at the spectacular idiocy of people behaving badly in public in the age of camera phones. Yesha covers growing up poor in a house full of extended family, what led her to a career in HR, and how she jumped into a career as a writer on a late night talk show. She shares her darkest moments after being laid off and struggling to support her son, working as a freelance writer, and taking the advice of a best friend to “act like a white lady” and ask for a job at The Root. She and Bridget discuss Black Lives Matter, why she loves TikTok, why she doesn’t believe that struggle makes you stronger, how white people are afraid of saying anything wrong, and the least racist country she’s ever traveled to.

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In fourteen hundred and ninety-two, Columbus sailed the ocean blue and accidentally discovered the New World. Horizons bloomed; the frontier spirit was born. Although Europeans were already poking around the coasts of Africa and the Indian subcontinent, Columbus sparked what we studied in school as the “Age of Exploration.” Now it’s the Age of Exploitation–no […]

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Shelby Steele joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the state of the nation and the underlying historical causes into modern tensions. Steele is a renowned author, expert, and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution specializing in the study of race relations, multiculturalism, and affirmative action.

Steele argued that today’s racial tensions are caused by an outgrowth of a change in racial understanding from the 1960s. The ’60s, he said, produced a “redemptive liberalism” in an effort to rid America of past experiences of racism, particularly on the left. The recent trend of corporations publicly declaring their support of Black Lives Matter, which reveals the incessant desire to be innocent of the past.

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard are joined by Prof. Carole Boston Weatherford, a New York Times best-selling children’s book author, and Caldecott Honor Book and Coretta Scott King Award winning biographer of Harriet Tubman and Fannie Lou Hamer. They discuss the opportunity presented by the national response to the George Floyd tragedy for ultimately improving race relations. Prof. Weatherford discusses the importance of teaching about the lives of African-American heroes and heroines, and their forgotten struggles to overcome adversity; what it means to teach a more complete and less romanticized history that is more inclusive; and how improved curricula, higher expectations, and a diverse faculty can more effectively inspire all children to strive to overcome adversity and empathize with people. She discusses her views on blues music as African-American language in song, and jazz as “the rhythm of daily life”; and how the sophisticated, improvisational artistry of jazz reflects African-Americans’ everyday experiences. Lastly, Prof. Weatherford offers a reading of her poem, “SNCC,” from her biography of 1960’s voting rights advocate Fannie Lou Hamer.

Story of the Week: Protesters in Massachusetts, Virginia, and other parts of the country have vandalized and removed statues of explorer Christopher Columbus this week due to his association with colonization and violence against Native Americans. Will these actions spark constructive dialogue about which historical figures society glorifies and marginalizes, or will they merely rile up Italian-Americans and create further tension? As school winds down for the summer and focus shifts to reopening plans this fall, a new Pioneer Institute report with ASU Prep Digital shows that online learning can work for most special needs students, and highlights the importance of meeting the diverse needs of all learners no matter the circumstances.

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Coach Tea is back for a frank conversation with Bridget about George Floyd, the protests, the riots, the looting, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the concept of white privilege. They discuss the frustration that a real issue has become a Trojan horse for all sorts of other agendas, how the movement has been co-opted, why solutions need to be personal and not legislated, and the problem with the argument “if you’re silent, you’re part of the problem.” They cover how capitalism fights racism, why the phrase “for the greater good” is so terrifying, how insanity is always louder than sanity, and the underlying insult inherent in white people apologizing for their privilege.

**Warning** This episode is not for the easily offended and is more explicit than usual

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Black Lives Matter: The Ideological Heir to Black Power

 

It’s become customary to refer to the Black Lives Matter movement, without much challenge, as one of the civil rights movements of our time. In other instances, it’s suggested that it’s the progeny of the civil rights movement itself.

But to say or imply that Black Lives Matter is the offspring of the civil rights movement of the 1960s is to misunderstand the history and character of that great moral revolution. It is to also misunderstand, or outright ignore, the intentions of Black Lives Matter while disregarding or rationalizing its tactics, agenda, and its aims. Black Lives Matter is in no way a civil rights movement and it’s certainly not an heir to the civil rights movement. The conduct consistently displayed and condoned by far too many Black Lives Matter members, in combination with the agenda expressed by its leaders, disqualifies Black Lives Matter from any consideration of being an extension of the civil rights movement.

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I’ve written before comparing the religious structure of Social Justice to that of Christianity. Now I have a new point to bring in. In another online group, a non-American asked for thoughts from other non-Americans on the protests and riots. It sounded frightening and unproductive to her, she said. More

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Member Post

 

I have struggled with how to respond to George Floyd’s murder. I’ll admit that I tend to stay silent when things like this come up because I’m afraid to say the wrong thing, or I’m afraid I’ll come down on the wrong side of the situation due to lack of information or understanding. But I […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Is There an Unreasonable Fear of Black Men?

 

When viral videos of conflicts between blacks and law enforcement officers, blacks being harassed by white women comedically known as “Karens,” or blacks being criminally profiled by overzealous white males are released, I make it a point to say as little as possible – especially on social media.

Generally, it’s very difficult to know what ensued and render judgment on what happened – and what should happen to achieve “justice” with minimal information provided in a 15-, 20-, or 25-second video clip. The Rodney King debacle should’ve taught us as much (but didn’t). Additional evidence is needed to help contextualize the incident for a better understanding of what exactly occurred and then, what should or shouldn’t happen to the relevant actors going forward. Ideally, prudence would dictate patience until supplementary evidence is made available before people dispense their verdicts and punishments.

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Coleman Hughes joins Brian Anderson to discuss the shooting death of Ahmaud Arbery, the widespread claims that his alleged murderers were motivated by racism, and public reaction to the killing—the subjects of Hughes’s article, “The Illusion of Certainty.”

Ahmaud Arbery’s violent death at the hands of Gregory and Travis McMichael has sparked nationwide outrage and reignited the debate over racial profiling. But “while it’s tempting to assume that the McMichaels were motivated by racism,” writes Hughes, “the only intellectually honest position is to admit that we do not know what motivated them—at least, not yet.”

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. 3,000 Attend Block Party in Deland, FL

 

You didn’t misread the title of this post, but it doesn’t accurately describe the actual event, nor does it suggest the dangerous implications of this type of activity given concerns about the outbreak of COVID-19. Gov. Ron DeSantis has done a very good job of managing Florida through COVID-19, but in spite of his efforts, we’re seeing eruptions like the one described in this post. If other states don’t act quickly to lighten the restrictions on its citizens, we may very well see civil violence and destruction across the country.

Let me summarize the way the gathering on Saturday, May 16, took place and how it was conveniently mischaracterized. First, some people tried to characterize its origins with a planned memorial:

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