Tag: Racism

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Pulse oximetry works on the principle that oxygen levels in the blood can affect the transmission of light through the tissue. It is also known that skin color also impacts the transmission of light. Forty years ago (when I worked on early university development of oximetry technology), it was common practice to calibrate the oximetry […]

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I enter some dangerous ground writing a sports themed post, made worse by it centering on soccer, and not even American soccer. But forgive me this one time. An incident occurred at a Champion’s League match yesterday between Paris Saint-Germain and Istanbul Basaksehir. From The Daily Mail: “The Champions League clash between Paris Saint-Germain and Istanbul Basaksehir was […]

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Join Jim and Greg, even though there are no good martinis today. They wince as Joe Biden taps radical lefty Xavier Becerra to run the Department of Health and Human Services. They also walk through the thoroughly unsurprising allegations that New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo runs a toxic work environment. And they fume as the Chicago Teachers’ Union says returning to in-person instruction is due to racism, sexism, and misogyny while national unions convince Joe Biden to demand $100 billion to reopen elementary schools.

Cydnee Black uploaded her first makeup tutorial to YouTube in 2013, at that time, she was one of the few African Americans doing makeup tutorials. She now has over 1 million subscribers and is considered an “influencer” even though she despises that term. She has since transitioned into researching moments in history that interest her and creating informational videos about topics such as the Clarence Thomas/Anita Hill hearings, JFK’s affairs, and the life of Coco Chanel, while still doing makeup applications. She talks to Bridget being a black girl with blue eyes, how she was bullied for “speaking white,” and how she and her sister were the only black kids at their school. They cover why you should never idolize anyone on the internet, why women hate their bodies so much, keeping themselves small to make others feel more comfortable, BLM, cancel culture, psychics, colorism, and being your own brand.

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Elements of the left and their allies in the media are constantly driving this point home: White people are bad and so is the culture that they have created. Everything we value as a society is bad and, more than that, little more than an ex post facto justification for the subjugation of non-whites. Western culture is white culture, […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Racism Still Exists in America

 

“One of the things I’ve heard is that if you acknowledge the problem [racism] then you are playing into the left’s narrative. And I want to say: But it’s not their narrative! We should take it back! It’s our narrative! There would be no civil rights legislation were it not for the Republican Party. Who led the fight to abolish slavery in this country?” —Kay Coles James

Kay Coles James, president of the Heritage Foundation, has experienced a level of notoriety lately due to attacks by Tucker Carlson for her belief that racism still exists in this country. She wrote a recent opinion piece for Fox News expressing her views. As a black woman and a conservative, she has seen important changes in this country on questions of race, and she doesn’t believe there is systemic racism; she does believe, however, that racism does still exist, and that conservatives should use the tools they have to deal with it. As an example, she writes about voucher programs as a way to empower black families to have a voice in educating their children. In addition, she has set up the Gloucester Institute that operates leadership and educational programs for minority college students. She also believes that efforts like the 1619 Project create a false narrative that creates more problems than it solves.

To me, the primary issue is not whether racism exists; I believe it does exist, but in small amounts. Instead, we should be asking whether it exists to the degree that we, Republicans in particular, should be developing solutions that train black Americans to be problem-solvers in new and creative ways that will work in these times.

Join Jim and Greg as they chronicle how Princeton University’s self-flagellation over systemic racism launched a federal investigation into whether they should no longer qualify for taxpayer dollars. They also cringe as two swing states (and, yes, Nevada is one of them) create mail-in voting loopholes that erode confidence in the system. And they hammer Joe Biden for claiming to be for and against fracking in the same answer.

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When you consider the extraordinary and disturbing events of the last several months (lockdowns, riots, etc.), it is not inappropriate to ask if there is any sanity left in this country. One thing’s for sure. If the answer is no, then the last people you should want to consult about it are so-called professionals in […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. All Lives Matter

 

People who think that phrase is racist are confused and are falling for the same fictions that are tearing the country apart.

America is not a racist country any more than America is an arsonist country, or a child-abuser country, or a wife-beater country, or a serial-killer country. America isn’t defined by any of those things, though all of those things are present, to a small degree, in America.

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In the last Presidential election, Donald Trump was lauded for his performance among black voters – he scored 4 percent of female black voters and a whopping 13 percent of black male voters, the highest since Richard Nixon. This isn’t shocking. Black voters have voted en masse for the Democratic Party since the mid-60s and […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

The last time I chatted with someone in a public place, we were discussing the change of local lizards this year. We usually see mostly green anoles — “chameleons” that can change from green to brown at will. But this year brown anoles — striped cousins that can’t change color — are all one sees. […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Oprah Conversation: “Racist!”

 

Let’s have a conversation about race, shall we? Because Oprah wants us to. Like on her new Apple TV show, “The Oprah Conversation,” the first episode of which was entitled “How To Be Anti-Racist” (because simply not being racist isn’t good enough). But be forewarned, white people. It is necessarily going to be a tad one-sided. That’s because the fundamental premise of any conversation with you about race is going to be that, well, you are just . . . no . . . damn . . . good. Alrighty? Let’s do it then.

Let’s talk about white racism, “white privilege,” “white advantage,” the “white power structure,” “whiteness,” and “white” this and “white” that and nothing but white, white, white, until if you hear the word “white” used in a derogatory way one more time, you’re just going to . . .

COVID-19 and the Black Lives Matter protests have turned race and racism into hot topics in both the United States and China. Throughout the pandemic, President Trump has been condemned as a racist for labeling the coronavirus “Kung Flu,” “China virus,” and “Wuhan virus.”

Meanwhile, protestors and rioters throughout the country—from New York to Minneapolis to Portland—have been violently assailing America as one big racist enterprise for the past two plus months. China has eagerly fanned this narrative to deflect criticisms of its human rights abuses.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

You know things are bad when you look back fondly on the Obama years as the good old days. Sure, it was on his watch that race relations did a one-eighty, the White House glowed in the rainbow colors and most of us were depicted as bitter clingers. But still, nobody back then would have […]

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Civil rights activist Bob Woodson joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the racism behind the left’s recent “anti-racist” activism. Woodson is the Founder and President of the Woodson Center, where you can learn more about his work on the 1779 Project.

Woodson said the message of the New York Times’ 1619 project takes advantage of specifically low-income black communities and falsely attributes their problems, namely the violence and brokenness of cities, as being external. The ideas lead essayist Hannah Nikole-Jones and her colleagues at the New York Times presented are “ahistorical,” he said.

Dave had the opportunity to talk with Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie during a recent press event where Wilkie mentioned that the VA had “turned a corner” in the last couple of years. Since large bureaucracies are not typically suited to a sharp change in direction, Dave thought to inquire more on the topic and the result was a fascinating exchange that we think you’ll find interesting indeed.

Then, continuing his series of compelling interviews with Ricochet Members, Dave talked with member Lilly B. about her recent post, “Little Crazy Children,” in which Lilly compares rampant charges of racism with the rampant accusations of witchcraft in Salem in the late 1600s. The similarities are (pardon the pun) arresting, as are Lilly’s thoughts on the current madness and the prospects for a peaceful resumption of civic life. All of which make for a thought provoking and informative show, which we’re sure you will enjoy.

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Black people constitute roughly 13% of the American population. Doesn’t sound like all that much, but somehow they manage to keep this big, sprawling, diverse country in endless turmoil. Take the recent George Floyd riots, for instance. Because of what happened to Floyd, they wreaked havoc in every major city in the country. Yes, there […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Rejecting Antiracism: Christian Conversations for Forgiveness and Reconciliation

 

I recently came upon the antiracism belief that individualism and merit are “racist.” Antiracists refer to them as “American white values.” The racializing of individualism and merit-based achievement seem to be exclusive to those who share the antiracist worldview. More and more people are eagerly embracing the tenets of critical race theory and antiracism as a public posture that exemplifies the noble pursuit of “racial justice.” I want to highlight what should be obvious– the fad of racializing everything, even a long-standing virtue as individual merit, is further eroding our already-fragile civic ties while trivializing real racism.

One of the problems with antiracism is its practice of condensing the complexity of unique individuality into shallow representations of “race.” This antiracist position refuses to see people– as people. There’s nothing distinctive about individuals in antiracism’s anthropological methodology. Antiracist ideological convictions demand advocates ignore the intrinsic worth of people in favor of a racialized preconception that divides people into two classes: oppressed, (blacks and other non-white “minorities”) and oppressors (white people). Shelby Steele called this reductionism a form of racial blindness. He wrote,

People who are in the grip of [racial blindness] … always miss the human being inside the black skin…Your color represents you in the mind of such people. They will have built a large part of their moral identity and, possibly, their politics around how they respond to your color. Thus, a part of them–the moral part–is invested not in you but in some idea of what your color means. And [if] they see you– the individual–they instantly call to mind this investment and determine, once again, to honor it. They are very likely proud of the way they have learned to relate to your color, proud of the moral magnanimity it gives them an opportunity to express.