Tag: Racism

Join Jim and Greg as they chronicle how Princeton University’s self-flagellation over systemic racism launched a federal investigation into whether they should no longer qualify for taxpayer dollars. They also cringe as two swing states (and, yes, Nevada is one of them) create mail-in voting loopholes that erode confidence in the system. And they hammer Joe Biden for claiming to be for and against fracking in the same answer.

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When you consider the extraordinary and disturbing events of the last several months (lockdowns, riots, etc.), it is not inappropriate to ask if there is any sanity left in this country. One thing’s for sure. If the answer is no, then the last people you should want to consult about it are so-called professionals in […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. All Lives Matter

 

People who think that phrase is racist are confused and are falling for the same fictions that are tearing the country apart.

America is not a racist country any more than America is an arsonist country, or a child-abuser country, or a wife-beater country, or a serial-killer country. America isn’t defined by any of those things, though all of those things are present, to a small degree, in America.

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In the last Presidential election, Donald Trump was lauded for his performance among black voters – he scored 4 percent of female black voters and a whopping 13 percent of black male voters, the highest since Richard Nixon. This isn’t shocking. Black voters have voted en masse for the Democratic Party since the mid-60s and […]

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The last time I chatted with someone in a public place, we were discussing the change of local lizards this year. We usually see mostly green anoles — “chameleons” that can change from green to brown at will. But this year brown anoles — striped cousins that can’t change color — are all one sees. […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Oprah Conversation: “Racist!”

 

Let’s have a conversation about race, shall we? Because Oprah wants us to. Like on her new Apple TV show, “The Oprah Conversation,” the first episode of which was entitled “How To Be Anti-Racist” (because simply not being racist isn’t good enough). But be forewarned, white people. It is necessarily going to be a tad one-sided. That’s because the fundamental premise of any conversation with you about race is going to be that, well, you are just . . . no . . . damn . . . good. Alrighty? Let’s do it then.

Let’s talk about white racism, “white privilege,” “white advantage,” the “white power structure,” “whiteness,” and “white” this and “white” that and nothing but white, white, white, until if you hear the word “white” used in a derogatory way one more time, you’re just going to . . .

COVID-19 and the Black Lives Matter protests have turned race and racism into hot topics in both the United States and China. Throughout the pandemic, President Trump has been condemned as a racist for labeling the coronavirus “Kung Flu,” “China virus,” and “Wuhan virus.”

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You know things are bad when you look back fondly on the Obama years as the good old days. Sure, it was on his watch that race relations did a one-eighty, the White House glowed in the rainbow colors and most of us were depicted as bitter clingers. But still, nobody back then would have […]

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Civil rights activist Bob Woodson joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the racism behind the left’s recent “anti-racist” activism. Woodson is the Founder and President of the Woodson Center, where you can learn more about his work on the 1779 Project.

Woodson said the message of the New York Times’ 1619 project takes advantage of specifically low-income black communities and falsely attributes their problems, namely the violence and brokenness of cities, as being external. The ideas lead essayist Hannah Nikole-Jones and her colleagues at the New York Times presented are “ahistorical,” he said.

Dave had the opportunity to talk with Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie during a recent press event where Wilkie mentioned that the VA had “turned a corner” in the last couple of years. Since large bureaucracies are not typically suited to a sharp change in direction, Dave thought to inquire more on the topic and the result was a fascinating exchange that we think you’ll find interesting indeed.

Then, continuing his series of compelling interviews with Ricochet Members, Dave talked with member Lilly B. about her recent post, “Little Crazy Children,” in which Lilly compares rampant charges of racism with the rampant accusations of witchcraft in Salem in the late 1600s. The similarities are (pardon the pun) arresting, as are Lilly’s thoughts on the current madness and the prospects for a peaceful resumption of civic life. All of which make for a thought provoking and informative show, which we’re sure you will enjoy.

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Black people constitute roughly 13% of the American population. Doesn’t sound like all that much, but somehow they manage to keep this big, sprawling, diverse country in endless turmoil. Take the recent George Floyd riots, for instance. Because of what happened to Floyd, they wreaked havoc in every major city in the country. Yes, there […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Rejecting Antiracism: Christian Conversations for Forgiveness and Reconciliation

 

I recently came upon the antiracism belief that individualism and merit are “racist.” Antiracists refer to them as “American white values.” The racializing of individualism and merit-based achievement seem to be exclusive to those who share the antiracist worldview. More and more people are eagerly embracing the tenets of critical race theory and antiracism as a public posture that exemplifies the noble pursuit of “racial justice.” I want to highlight what should be obvious– the fad of racializing everything, even a long-standing virtue as individual merit, is further eroding our already-fragile civic ties while trivializing real racism.

One of the problems with antiracism is its practice of condensing the complexity of unique individuality into shallow representations of “race.” This antiracist position refuses to see people– as people. There’s nothing distinctive about individuals in antiracism’s anthropological methodology. Antiracist ideological convictions demand advocates ignore the intrinsic worth of people in favor of a racialized preconception that divides people into two classes: oppressed, (blacks and other non-white “minorities”) and oppressors (white people). Shelby Steele called this reductionism a form of racial blindness. He wrote,

Rob Long is in for Jim again today. Today, Rob and Greg kick off the 2020 Major League Baseball season by enjoying a parody of how the Washington Nationals are failing to keep up with today’s woke cultural standards. Then they cheer the U.S. for closing down the Chinese consulate in Houston. They also chronicle a massive failure in Minneapolis as the effort to replace police there proves rather challenging. And they roll their eyes as Joe Biden claims President Trump is America’s first racist president for calling the coronavirus the Chinese virus. They also use the opportunity to bash the most racist president of in American history.

Yascha Mounk is the founder of Persuasion, an online community and publication for people who believe in the importance of the social practice of persuasion, and are determined to defend free speech and free inquiry against all its enemies. They seek to persuade people who disagree with them, rather than to mock or troll them. He and Bridget discuss the rise of the populism, why status anxiety is the strongest predictor of populist movement in society, the idea of white fragility, and why exhorting whites in the US to take on a strong collective racial identity is not the way to build a fair, multi-ethnic democracy in this country. They look at how many authoritarian leaders have come to power in the last 20 years, share their hope for the future, and examine the idea that many Americans don’t want to win the culture war, they want the culture war to go away.

 

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Casual Bigotry of Elite Black Americans: National Museum of African American History & Culture

 

Today I came upon a tweet by Byron York that startled me. York’s tweet included an attachment from the National Museum of African American History & Culture describing what they call “Aspects and Assumptions of Whiteness & White Culture in the United States”. Let me post Mr. York’s tweet below.

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Nick Cannon gets to keep his stupid Fox show despite his Farrakhan-style racism, anti-Semitism and apology, which he didn’t mean. Can this be anything but Black Privilege™️, the state of being held to lower standards due to race…the ultimate condescension from racist whites who expect less of you? Read More View Post

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Eric Kaufmann joined host Ben Domenech to discuss his work within fields of research related to populism across the world and specifically in the United States. Kaufmann is a professor of politics at Birkbeck College at the University of London and is the author of “Whiteshift: Populism, Immigration, and the Future of White Majorities.”

Kaufmann argues that the new antiracism movement worldwide, but which is specifically dominant in American culture, is a form of secular religion. He refers to the modern American sentiment as the “third great awokening,” following the former waves in the late 60s and the 90s. It stems from the idea that tradition, both religious and national, ought to be eliminated to make room for the new religion of antiracism. It resembles many historical international movements, Kaufmann said.

Fox News Senior Political Analyst Brit Hume joined host Ben Domenech to discuss race relations in America and how the issue has been politically manipulated by the left.

Hume argued that, since the nation reached an overwhelming consensus against racism, marked by the passage of the Civil Right Act, movements such as Black Lives Matter are capitalizing on that sentiment to usher in a new era with a different agenda. A movement that was once about tearing down barriers has switched to focus on tearing down statues.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Isiah Thomas Calls for End of ‘Race’ Category

 

An NBA program, carried on ESPN and intended to promote the left’s line on race, went a bit sideways. June 23 on NBA Game Time, Isiah Thomas, a basketball great with a master’s degree in education, called for an end to the use of race as an official classification, arguing that it has been misused for bad purposes from its origin. The young woman interviewing him had to smile through the interview, however much this was heresy in the present political moment. His comments accord more with the long time position of Alexander Hamilton III, a lawyer and American Family Radio daily talk show host. Contra Dennis Prager, the answer is not to be “colorblind.” Rather, we should learn from Deuteronomy 16:19, and not the “1619 Project.”

Isiah Thomas earned an education master’s degree at UC Berkeley in 2013. His study focused on the education and life outcomes for black male college athletes.* Instead of promoting the Democrat Party line, Thomas called for an end to the use of “race” as a classification label. He did so on the basis of theories and histories of “racialization,” the invention and development of this relatively new way of labeling and dividing people. Isiah Thomas noted that our government, starting at the national level, has four boxes: national origin, citizenship, ethnicity, and race. It is his position that race has been defined and used for ill purpose and should be eliminated from official programs. You get plenty of descriptive categorization from national origin, citizenship, and ethnicity.