Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Trump: Too Much of a Good Thing?

 

Let me begin by saying that I am very glad, on so many levels, that Trump has been holding his daily updates for the COVID-19 Task Force. Here are some of the reasons I think they are a good idea:

  1. The broadcast tells the public that Trump and the task force members want us to be informed. Transparency is critical.
  2. In spite of the confusion and inconsistencies of the models, the Task Force is determined to give us the best and most up-to-date information available.
  3. The Task Force members, even if we don’t always agree on how they arrive at policy, or about their refusal to give the available drugs their full endorsement, have been clear about their reasons.
  4. It is a healthy sign to see that Trump is not always in lock-step with the Task Force members.

So what’s the problem? My biggest issue is Trump himself.

I don’t mind his going after reporters; they are asking repetitive, foolish, and manipulative questions. I think that Trump’s pointing out this irresponsible behavior to the public is valuable. I also think the public benefits by seeing him daily as a reminder that he’s in charge of the country, and knowledgeable about the situation; when he’s not, he defers to his Task Force members. His praise of those on the front line is admirable and positive.

But he is proceeding in a number of ways that I think will damage his credibility and the appreciation of the public:

  1. He is spending far too much time speaking at these forums. I realize that the people who are watching don’t view these presentations every day, but he not only repeats information that is dated, he does it several times during his time at the dais.
  2. He needs to remember that he is speaking to the general public, not just his supporters. His bad habit of overusing certain words—incredible, perfect, and other superlative terms reflects a lack of imagination. It starts to grate on the nerves after a while. (This effect would be reduced by less time to speak, not more discipline.)
  3. The overall time for this forum should be reduced. People will begin to tire from the length of these forums, and may very well turn them off completely—and be “turned off” to their purpose. It also gives reporters more time to try to trap Trump into a response that can be distorted.

So how could these opportunities be improved?

  1. Limit the President’s time at the beginning to 10 minutes, with 10 minutes for questions. Include the most important highlights, rather than trying to cover every topic.
  2. Since time will be limited, reporters should be referred to their colleagues for information when they insist on asking duplicate questions.
  3. Limit the number of questions a reporter can ask.
  4. Begin to bring in Mike Pence just after Trump finishes his introduction. He is, after all, heading the Task Force.
  5. The doctors seem to be using their speaking time effectively. We may not like everything they’re telling us, but they seem to be building credibility with the public
  6. These are not campaign rallies where Trump is speaking only to his base. This is the American public. But his speaking can certainly influence public perception of Trump and their decisions for the upcoming election.

Trump should use his time, and the public’s time, well.

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  1. DrewInWisconsin, Ham-Fisted Bu… Coolidge

    Susan Quinn: These are not campaign rallies where Trump is speaking only to his base. This is the American public. But his speaking can certainly influence public perception of Trump and their decisions for the upcoming election.

    And in fact, his approval ratings continue to climb. And I think it’s precisely because of these daily briefings.

    So, Susan, I’m afraid I’ll have to disagree. “Too much” Trump has been a very good thing. ; )

    From the link above:

    What’s more, he said that Trump is winning respect for his efforts to focus on getting the economy back in business while he and his administration fight the spread of the virus.

    “He is also speaking honestly when he says we cannot stay in lockdown forever. It might not be what we ultimately do, or the right thing, but he’s being honest that life will have to go back to a semblance of normality in the future. It might not be reality but it’s comforting to some people in this moment of unpredictability,” said the analysis.

    Zogby found approval of Trump among middle-age voters, Catholics, those in small towns, those without college degrees, and millennials and Generation Z members.

    But he continues to lag among suburbanites and independents.

    Still, Trump’s support among black voters is getting better. “Trump’s numbers continue to improve with African American voters; his current job approval rating is 36% at least somewhat approve/63% at least somewhat disapprove,” said the survey.

    • #1
    • April 7, 2020, at 7:33 AM PDT
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  2. Percival Thatcher
    Percival Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Susan Quinn: His bad habit of overusing certain words—incredible, perfect, and other superlative terms reflects a lack of imagination. It starts to grate on the nerves after a while.

    For me. it was some time in early 2016. I like most of what he’s doing, but I can’t stand listening to him talk.

    • #2
    • April 7, 2020, at 7:47 AM PDT
    • 18 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  3. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    DrewInWisconsin, Negative Infl… (View Comment):
    So, Susan, I’m afraid I’ll have to disagree. “Too much” Trump has been a very good thing. ; )

    From the same survey:

    In our latest Zogby Poll, 48% of likely voters rated Trump’s handling of the Covid-19 crisis positively, while 52% rated it negatively. Voters were not as positive about Trump’s response to the crisis as they were with Dr. Fauci of NIAID or Governor Andrew Cuomo of New York, but the president still received better marks than Congress, Joe Biden and Senator Bernie Sanders.

    I’m suggesting that over time, these ratings could drop, @drewinwisconsin.

    • #3
    • April 7, 2020, at 7:48 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  4. I Walton Member

     My assumption is that this will end in a few weeks, if not he needs to do exactly what you’re suggesting. However, he needs to say “back to work but old folks and the infirm remain isolated” after about a month of this shut down. It will have been no more than a EU vacation stop.

    • #4
    • April 7, 2020, at 7:52 AM PDT
    • 8 likes
  5. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    I Walton (View Comment):

    My assumption is that this will end in a few weeks, if not he needs to do exactly what you’re suggesting. However, he needs to say “back to work but old folks and the infirm remain isolated” after about a month of this shut down. It will have been no more than a EU vacation stop.

    @iwalton, I’m not sure what you men by “it will end in a few weeks”; if you mean the part I bolded above, I agree. But because people will keep getting sick, and some of those who go back to work will get sick, you can be sure the media will be all over it. So Trump may need to keep his public presence for a while, just to offset the distortions of what is actually happening.

    • #5
    • April 7, 2020, at 8:06 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  6. Kay of MT Member

    President Trump is not a smooth, polished, and glib politician and I for one am grateful he is not. He has far too many people advising him, each with a different political view. Not being a world class doctor, scientist, or another “expert” he does the best he can in picking his experts, for us and for the United States of America. So I can forgive him for occasionally making a wrong pick, and for his repetitions. If you can’t stand his voice, don’t listen.

    • #6
    • April 7, 2020, at 8:09 AM PDT
    • 20 likes
  7. Jon1979 Lincoln

    I think the dailies do serve a certain purpose to start making the briefings feel routine, because we’re going to get to the point sometime in the near future where the relaxation of the COVID-19 restrictions will be proposed by Trump, and the usual suspects will freak out — a few legitimately, but the majority because they see freaking out over loosening of the restrictions as a political weapon to use in the 2020 campaign cycle.

    Trump can help himself in the run-up to that point by going out each day and making the case that the number of infections and deaths have slowed and (hopefully) begun to decline, and getting the public use to that information. It will make it easier then to start doing targeted easing of the limitations and have the message get through, since the majority of the reaction within the media and from Democrats is likely to be Trump cares more about business than human beings and will have blood on his hands.

    How he eases off the current limits, and how fast the economy starts trending back to normal by mid-October, are going to be the keys to whether or not he gets re-elected, where you already have talking heads on MSNBC trying to claim Trump should be tried for killing people from coronavirus. He can’t step back too far and let stuff like this become the narrative:

    • #7
    • April 7, 2020, at 8:22 AM PDT
    • 10 likes
  8. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    Jon1979 (View Comment):
    He can’t step back too far and let stuff like this become the narrative:

    I guess I don’t know what “too far” is, @jon1979. I still think he must be a presence, and I don’t think how much he’s a presence will determine whether people think he’s a murderer. I just keep thinking of those independents, the people in the middle and how he affects them when he’s up front so much. I know his big fans will accept anything he does; I won’t.

    • #8
    • April 7, 2020, at 8:33 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  9. Barfly Member

    Percival (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn: His bad habit of overusing certain words—incredible, perfect, and other superlative terms reflects a lack of imagination. It starts to grate on the nerves after a while.

    For me. it was some time in early 2016. I like most of what he’s doing, but I can’t stand listening to him talk.

    His public speaking has undoubtedly improved in office. What put me off about DJT in 2016 was his seeming inability to finish a sentence before starting the next one. He’s better about that these days, even when speaking extemporaneously.

    • #9
    • April 7, 2020, at 8:35 AM PDT
    • 8 likes
  10. Percival Thatcher
    Percival Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Barfly (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn: His bad habit of overusing certain words—incredible, perfect, and other superlative terms reflects a lack of imagination. It starts to grate on the nerves after a while.

    For me. it was some time in early 2016. I like most of what he’s doing, but I can’t stand listening to him talk.

    His public speaking has undoubtedly improved in office. What put me off about DJT in 2016 was his seeming inability to finish a sentence before starting the next one. He’s better about that these days, even when speaking extemporaneously.

    He does deliver prepared speeches well. Even the stuff that I didn’t like about the last State of the Union was because of the content, not the delivery. I’ve just never been charmed by his extemporaneous efforts.

    • #10
    • April 7, 2020, at 8:46 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  11. DrewInWisconsin, Ham-Fisted Bu… Coolidge

    Jon1979 (View Comment):
    He can’t step back too far and let stuff like this become the narrative:

    This is what I think, too. If he stops speaking, the media narrative (lies from the pit of hell) becomes the prominent one. As long as he keeps going out there on a daily basis in the “serious but optimistic” tone he’s been using, his narrative becomes the prominent one, and the media is stuck in “reactive” mode. He can’t let them take the lead. He’s got to keep them on the back foot.

    • #11
    • April 7, 2020, at 8:46 AM PDT
    • 21 likes
  12. DonG (skeptic) Coolidge

    Only take questions from science reporters. Sorry Jim Acosta, you are dumb and your questions just make more dumbness.

    • #12
    • April 7, 2020, at 8:50 AM PDT
    • 12 likes
  13. PHCheese Member

    There was a time when I couldn’t stand Trump now I look forward to his briefing. He can’t call out the fake news often enough. Their insidious. Take this as a compliment but you are not one of the great unwashed. They need lots of repetition so as to absorb thoughts. Trump is showing a tremendous grasp of some very complicated issues. There a bunch of specialized experts that know much in their area but Trump, I think, wraps up the whole picture. Take a step back and consider a President Biden running this show.OMG.

    • #13
    • April 7, 2020, at 8:55 AM PDT
    • 14 likes
  14. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    DrewInWisconsin, Negative Infl… (View Comment):

    Jon1979 (View Comment):
    He can’t step back too far and let stuff like this become the narrative:

    This is what I think, too. If he stops speaking, the media narrative (lies from the pit of hell) becomes the prominent one. As long as he keeps going out there on a daily basis in the “serious but optimistic” tone he’s been using, his narrative becomes the prominent one, and the media is stuck in “reactive” mode. He can’t let them take the lead. He’s got to keep them on the back foot.

    Drew, I didn’t ask him to stop speaking!!! I asked him to pull back a bit. Please read the OP.

    • #14
    • April 7, 2020, at 8:57 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  15. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    PHCheese (View Comment):
    Take this as a compliment but you are not one of the great unwashed. They need lots of repetition so as to absorb thoughts.

    Fair enough, @phcheese. I may not be part of the great unwashed, but this stuff can be pretty overwhelming. Then again, do we want to speak of the public as the “great unwashed?” Sounds a little like the Dems, doesn’t it?

    • #15
    • April 7, 2020, at 8:59 AM PDT
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  16. Jon1979 Lincoln

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):

    Jon1979 (View Comment):
    He can’t step back too far and let stuff like this become the narrative:

    I guess I don’t know what “too far” is, @jon1979. I still think he must be a presence, and I don’t think how much he’s a presence will determine whether people think he’s a murderer. I just keep thinking of those independents, the people in the middle and how he affects them when he’s up front so much. I know his big fans will accept anything he does; I won’t.

    I do think the independents want to hear more of Fauci and Birx than of Trump. But I just see the fight coming over reopening of the economy, to where Trump and not the doctors, is going to have to be the lead voice. If the president can ease into that new narrative, he’ll be in better shape (though I know Trump never eases into anything when it comes to using superlatives to describe actions).

    • #16
    • April 7, 2020, at 8:59 AM PDT
    • 10 likes
  17. She Reagan
    She Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I’m of the opinion that he’d do better to limit his appearances at these daily briefings to once or twice a week. He has a team handling the issue, and he should show that he trusts them, by letting them do just that. Yesterday, in the midst of that whole Theodore Roosevelt, Navy, captain, Navy Secretary business, I had to shut it off. That should have taken at most, 1.5 minutes in which some dolt of a reporter (trying to stir something up) asked a question, and Trump said, “As Commander in Chief, I’m reviewing the matter, and you will hear about my intervention and decision after, and when, I’ve made it. Let’s move on.” All that stuff about “he made a mistake,” and “he went to Annapolis (or wherever it was) so he must be very smart,” and “he has a good record, but I don’t want to see a man destroyed,” and “perhaps it was an overreaction,” AFTER Trump had already said he fully supported the SecNav’s decision, just looks and sounds bad. I wish only that, when he goes after reporters to shut them up, he’d shut up himself, and stop stirring the pot so that they keep asking questions about the same thing in an attempt to keep the matter front and center. 

    FTR, my answer on the Navy thing, speaking as a rather ignorant civilian would be along the lines of “Sending signals that one’s troops are not operationally ready and that one has extreme reservations about the sincerity and effectiveness of one’s commanding officers to insure that they are, or to keep them that way, is information that, if not explicitly classified, certainly ought to be, just based on its subject matter. Remember Hillary Clinton, and all the stuff that was divulged in her emails–and how the excuse from the Left was that ‘it’s not explicitly classified, so it’s OK?’ I remember that too. But I knew that what she did was wrong, and anyone with any sense knows that too, and that she should have been sanctioned at the time (cue digressive rant about Comey and Brennan). Anyone with any sense knows that. The same is true here. The commander of that ship should not have taken his concerns public. He was absolutely out of line in what he did. I am reviewing the matter only to make sure that the discipline applied was commensurate with the offense. I’ll get back to you on that.

    Next?”

    I wish he’d show some discipline himself. But that’s unlikely.

    • #17
    • April 7, 2020, at 9:01 AM PDT
    • 13 likes
  18. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    She (View Comment):

    I’m of the opinion that he’d do better to limit his appearances at these daily briefings to once or twice a week. He has a team handling the issue, and he should show that he trusts them, by letting them do just that. Yesterday, in the midst of that whole Theodore Roosevelt, Navy, captain, Navy Secretary business, I had to shut it off. That should have taken at most, 1.5 minutes in which some dolt of a reporter (trying to stir something up) asked a question, and Trump said, “As Commander in Chief, I’m reviewing the matter, and you will hear about my intervention and decision after, and when, I’ve made it. Let’s move on.” All that stuff about “he made a mistake,” and “he went to Annapolis (or wherever it was) so he must be very smart,” and “he has a good record, but I don’t want to see a man destroyed,” and “perhaps it was an overreaction,” AFTER Trump had already said he fully supported the SecNav’s decision, just looks and sounds bad. I wish only that, when he goes after reporters to shut them up, he’d shut up himself, and stop stirring the pot so that they keep asking questions about the same thing in an attempt to keep the matter front and center.

    FTR, my answer on the Navy thing, speaking as a rather ignorant civilian would be along the lines of “Sending signals that one’s troops are not operationally ready and that one has extreme reservations about the sincerity and effectiveness of one’s commanding officers to insure that they are, or to keep them that way, is information that, if not explicitly classified, certainly ought to be, just based on its subject matter. Remember Hillary Clinton, and all the stuff that was divulged in her emails–and how the excuse from the Left was that ‘it’s not explicitly classified, so it’s OK?’ I remember that too. But I knew that what she did was wrong, and anyone with any sense knows that too, and that she should have been sanctioned at the time (cue digressive rant about Comey and Brennan). Anyone with any sense knows that. The same is true here. The commander of that ship should not have taken his concerns public. He was absolutely out of line in what he did. I am reviewing the matter only to make sure that the discipline applied was commensurate with the offense. I’ll get back to you on that.

    Next?”

    I wish he’d show some discipline himself. But that’s unlikely.

    I’m with you, @she. I’ve been shutting off the last couple early. To say he was going to review the military decision was insulting. Stay in your lane, Trump.

    Edit: In a later comment, @cliffordbrown pointed out that the Secty was out of line, and the only one with the authority to call him on it was our Cmdr. in Chief. I see his point and defer to his wisdom.

    • #18
    • April 7, 2020, at 9:04 AM PDT
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  19. Ralphie Member

    It’s fine. As during 2016, let Trump be Trump. He hires, fires, adapts. What has surprised me is how much in command he is. I would suggest he is as fast as JFK answering questions, and better when the back and forth is lively. Not a lot of ums, uhs. 

    Remember when Obama put Timothy Gietner on the spot at the beginning of his administration? He made Gietner’s first major press exposure a near disaster. And Trump has not put any of his administration under more fire from the press than he puts himself. He stuck with Kavannaugh.

    My husband said the other day that he thinks the best two presidents in our lives was Reagan and Trump, who both were not conventional politicians.

    • #19
    • April 7, 2020, at 9:16 AM PDT
    • 9 likes
  20. The Reticulator Member

    Susan Quinn: Trump should use his time, and the public’s time, well.

    He’s using my time well, and I’m a member of the public. I haven’t watched any of these. 

    • #20
    • April 7, 2020, at 9:28 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  21. David Carroll Thatcher
    David Carroll Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    I agree in part and disagree in part. I wish the President would stop telling us how smart he is and what a great job he is doing. He is doing a great job, but him when he tells us that, he detracts from that very message. Better to show than to tell. Having said that, Trump is Trump. He can’t help himself and he won’t change anytime soon.

    To me, the long briefings send the message that he cares, he is fully engaged, and he is focused on the current crisis. Shorter appearances by him would send the wrong message. Unlike other presidents (none of whom in my lifetime would have spent so much time personally fielding questions), he demonstrates his deep engagement in this process. His handling of the crisis may not have been as “perfect” has he thinks it was, but it was pretty darned good.

    His sparring with the Democrat Propaganda Media (CNN, PBS and others) keeps me glued to the briefing.

     

    • #21
    • April 7, 2020, at 9:31 AM PDT
    • 11 likes
  22. Larry3435 Member

    Every now and then I see a segment on the news where they have “ordinary people” on to ask questions of an expert panel. The remarkable thing about these “ordinary people” is that their questions are sooooo much better than than the questions being asked by the so-called journalists in the press corps. Shorter, sharper, better informed, and actually seeking to get useful information. CNN should fire everyone on its staff and hire some of these “ordinary people.” It reminds me of what Bill Buckley said about the first two thousand names in the Boston telephone directory.

    • #22
    • April 7, 2020, at 9:39 AM PDT
    • 11 likes
  23. She Reagan
    She Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Larry3435 (View Comment):

    Every now and then I see a segment on the news where they have “ordinary people” on to ask questions of an expert panel. The remarkable thing about these “ordinary people” is that their questions are sooooo much better than than the questions being asked by the so-called journalists in the press corps. Shorter, sharper, better informed, and actually seeking to get useful information. CNN should fire everyone on its staff and hire some of these “ordinary people.” It reminds me of what Bill Buckley said about the first two thousand names in the Boston telephone directory.

    Completely agree. I used to say that I’d love to see a panel of talking heads made up of my mother-in-law, and some of my neighbors out here in the sticks.

    • #23
    • April 7, 2020, at 9:45 AM PDT
    • 9 likes
  24. Percival Thatcher
    Percival Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Ralphie (View Comment):

    It’s fine. As during 2016, let Trump be Trump. He hires, fires, adapts. What has surprised me is how much in command he is. I would suggest he is as fast as JFK answering questions, and better when the back and forth is lively. Not a lot of ums, uhs.

    Remember when Obama put Timothy Gietner on the spot at the beginning of his administration? He made Gietner’s first major press exposure a near disaster. And Trump has not put any of his administration under more fire from the press than he puts himself. He stuck with Kavannaugh.

    My husband said the other day that he thinks the best two presidents in our lives was Reagan and Trump, who both were not conventional politicians.

    I gotta throw a flag on Reagan as a non-politician. He was two-time President of the Screen Actors Guild from 1947-52 and 1959-60, and two-time Governor of California 1967-75. The presidency was not his first rodeo.

    • #24
    • April 7, 2020, at 9:46 AM PDT
    • 8 likes
  25. MarciN Member

    I would bet his intention when he appointed Pence to run the task force was exactly that–to step back from this situation, for all the reasons given in the OP. I think he has been unable to do that because Donald Trump really is “of the people,” and he is as swept up in this nightmare as everyone else is.

    On news websites such as the NYT and Yahoo! and the WSJ, I like to watch the stories and “trending” searches selected for display. It’s always interesting to see what the general public is worried about from one moment to the next. For the past three weeks, the only news that has mattered to the public is the pandemic, particularly how it is playing out in the United States. We are living in the midst of a reality television show. People are watching this story because (a) it affects all of us in one way or another, (b) it’s new and different, and (c) we don’t know how it’s going to end.

    Donald Trump has my sympathies. I have had to disconnect completely from the WSJ. I can’t take the pressure, and the reporters are covering it with a “Do something!” forcefulness that I have never seen in my lifetime. He too is surrounded by people behaving that way. I don’t know how he has borne it. My instincts are to run away from that type of pressure.

    I have not listened to any of the briefings. But I do pray for him because I don’t know how anyone could withstand the pressure he is under right now. I couldn’t. I know that much. And for him personally, this bug is wiping out all of his hard work over the past three years. It would be like watching a house you had just built burn to the ground.

    All he can do is say every day, “I’m right here. We’ll face this together. You’ll know whatever I know as soon as I know it.”

    The world and the country are going through tremendous change right now. We can’t stop it, but we can bend it such that we come out where we want to be at the end of it. When change comes, the best leaders communicate to their organizations constantly about what is happening. They articulate goals and celebrate the daily successes in real time as they are achieved. They are always accessible to everyone in the organization. That is transformational leadership. That is the best leadership we could ask for. In my opinion, Trump is doing exactly the right thing. To my surprise, he is an effective leader. I did not see that quality or talent in him before now.

    • #25
    • April 7, 2020, at 9:51 AM PDT
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  26. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    David Carroll (View Comment):
    His sparring with the Democrat Propaganda Media (CNN, PBS and others) keeps me glued to the briefing.

    The “journalists” drive me crazy. What a bunch of idiots. I noticed that he interrupted a question for Fauci, said it had already been asked “15 times,” and moved on. I’d like him to do more of that, rather than indulging them. Just a simple, “I already answered that question from so-and-so, go ask him.” That would make it a lot shorter, @davidcarroll.

    • #26
    • April 7, 2020, at 9:53 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  27. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    Larry3435 (View Comment):
    CNN should fire everyone on its staff and hire some of these “ordinary people.”

    Works for me, @larry3435. I’ve seen those ordinary questioners, too, and they ask great questioners. Gee, I guess it matters whether you are trying to trick the person or get information! 😊

    • #27
    • April 7, 2020, at 9:55 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  28. Franco Member
    Franco Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    If I could tweek Trump here and there, I would.

    But he’s so much better at Presidenin’ than anyone I can think of, and that’s even including a few policy disagreements.

    He cannot allow Fauci and Brix free reign. They are nannies who reflexively prescribe bed-rest for the nation, and they will always err on the side of caution. Emphasis on “err”….

    They, the press and politicians have way too much invested in having this crisis be as bad as possible, last as long as possible and to blame Trump and his administration for as many mistakes as possible. 

    As others have said, Trump needs to continually remind everyone that there’s a limit to this shutdown. 

    In the next 10 days, I’m predicting this will fizzle-out. The next phase in the argument will be keeping the mitigation in place so as not to risk a return to high levels ( which doctors and press and skittish or partisan politicians will argue) and opening up ASAP within reason.

    By that time, a good majority of Americans will have had enough of these theatrics and enough of the loss of freedom to agree to open up.

    The argument for opening up will be compelling.

    Either the models were overly pessimistic, or mitigation works very well.

    The idea of mitigation was to buy time to ramp up hospitals, ventilators etc. If they 

    If we don’t hit peak capacity in the expected surge, then there remains the ability to handle any subsequent wave. Increased testing and monitoring, even as it exists presently, can track and mitigate in better isolation.
    The fact that CNN and other fake news outlets don’t want to air these briefings tells me all I need to know. That and rising poll numbers.

     

     

     

     

    • #28
    • April 7, 2020, at 9:55 AM PDT
    • 17 likes
  29. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    MarciN (View Comment):
    We are living in the midst of a reality television show. People are watching this story because (a) it affects all of us in one way or another, (b) it’s new and different, and (c) we don’t know how it’s going to end. 

    So true, @marcin! What a powerful metaphor. Only we can’t choose whether we want to be part of it or not.

    Great comment, too!

    • #29
    • April 7, 2020, at 9:58 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  30. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn

    Franco (View Comment):
    They, the press and politicians have way too much invested in having this crisis be as bad as possible, last as long as possible and to blame Trump and his administration for as many mistakes as possible. 

    @franco, I get your point on all the groups listed except the doctors. Why would they want to make Trump look bad? Won’t that wash over on them?

    • #30
    • April 7, 2020, at 10:02 AM PDT
    • 3 likes