Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Mayors Trying to Outdo One Another

 

First, it was DeBlasio threatening to permanently close synagogues if New York Jews held services. Not to be outdone, the mayor of Washington DC says, “You’re not so tough on your citizens. Look at what I’m doing!”

Hopefully, the DC police will ignore this civil rights violation, but what I can see are governors and mayors running for re-election on platforms of “Look how tough I fought the virus.” Let’s hope their citizens “thank” them for their efforts by selecting someone else.

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  1. iWe Reagan
    iWe Joined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    First we release all the criminals, because being in jail is dangerous don’cha know. Then we put normal citizens in prison!

     

    • #1
    • March 31, 2020, at 5:37 AM PDT
    • 17 likes
  2. Stad Thatcher
    Stad

    iWe (View Comment):

    First we release all the criminals, because being in jail is dangerous don’cha know. Then we put normal citizens in prison!

     

    That’s been in much of the criticism, but then you add the fact the virus is starting to be found in jails and prisons.

    • #2
    • March 31, 2020, at 5:41 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  3. Ralphie Member

    Stad (View Comment):

    iWe (View Comment):

    First we release all the criminals, because being in jail is dangerous don’cha know. Then we put normal citizens in prison!

     

    That’s been in much of the criticism, but then you add the fact the virus is starting to be found in jails and prisons.

    It could be about money; i.e. the state probably has to pay for Weinstien’s medical bills. 

    • #3
    • March 31, 2020, at 6:25 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  4. DonG (skeptic) Coolidge

    But, IF it saves just ONE life….

    • #4
    • March 31, 2020, at 6:35 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  5. Mark Camp Member

    It seems to me that it would help flatten the curve if everyone were to stay six feet away from each private citizen. 

    In the case of other citizens: six feet horizontally. 

    For despots like di Blasio and DC Mayor Muriel Bowser: six feet in a downward direction, permanently.

    The Americans being a G_d-fearing people obviously do not wish the latter spatial separation on anyone, even on tyrants. More to the point, we’d still be the same voters with the same faith in government, so we would just replace the dead gangsters with live ones.

    • #5
    • March 31, 2020, at 6:45 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  6. Addiction Is A Choice Member

    Limbaugh is right: The reason the Left loves tyrants like Castro so much? They’re jealous of their power!

    • #6
    • March 31, 2020, at 6:49 AM PDT
    • 11 likes
  7. Tree Rat Member

    Stad: threatening to permanently close synagogues

    I won’t be impressed unless they single out mosques, instead.

    Okay, I won’t be impressed then, either, not that there is any danger of them actually doing it.

    • #7
    • March 31, 2020, at 7:22 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  8. Stad Thatcher
    Stad

    Mark Camp (View Comment):

    It seems to me that it would help flatten the curve if everyone were to stay six feet away from each private citizen.

    In the case of other citizens: six feet horizontally.

    For despots like di Blasio and DC Mayor Muriel Bowser: six feet in a downward direction, permanently.

    The Americans being a G_d-fearing people obviously do not wish the latter spatial separation on anyone, even on tyrants. More to the point, we’d still be the same voters with the same faith in government, so we would just replace the dead gangsters with live ones.

    In general, people typically comply with instructions or guidelines during emergencies. But when you start dictating to people what they can and can’t do, they get angry. And when you start threatening them with stern punishments if they don’t behave, they rise up in mass civil disobedience to prove they can and don’t take kindly to threats.

    This is when the newly-minted dictator has to decide whether or not to use force, and if so, how much.

    • #8
    • March 31, 2020, at 8:20 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  9. Tex929rr Coolidge

    Is it that too many people in close proximity encourages bad decision making? I see it in big cities here in Texas, and the counties that contain those cities make similarly bad decisions, at least if you believe in classical liberalism. Even here in my rural county, the mayor of the one incorporated city mandated stricter guidelines than the county judge did for the unincorporated portions of the county. The really disturbing part is people on social media (many from the unincorporated part) demanding that the county follow the city’s lead and crack down more.

    It may well be that those willing to give up liberty (especially everyone else’s) just squawk louder than most. But it sure is disturbing.

    • #9
    • March 31, 2020, at 8:56 AM PDT
    • 6 likes
  10. Stad Thatcher
    Stad

    Tex929rr (View Comment):
    It may well be that those willing to give up liberty (especially everyone else’s) just squawk louder than most. But it sure is disturbing.

    Liberals in general have a hard time seeing people enjoy their freedoms . . .

    • #10
    • March 31, 2020, at 9:14 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  11. Eridemus Coolidge

    Not exactly the same type….but another example of “city powers getting out of bounds” :

    https://archinect.com/news/article/150190086/new-york-s-roofs-may-get-a-lot-greener-soon

    Is there nothing they won’t attempt? I wonder how this could even be legal, except under some what’s-best-for-future-society arguments perhaps. The next upgrade in a few more years will be that you have to also grow and harvest corn on these created acres.

    • #11
    • March 31, 2020, at 9:57 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  12. Roderic Coolidge

    Here’s an article about why strict social distancing is so necessary, and why cheating on the rules is so dangerous to everyone.

    You should perceive your entire family to function as a single individual unit: If one person puts themselves at risk, everyone in the unit is at risk. Seemingly small social chains get large and complex with alarming speed. If your son visits his girlfriend, and you later sneak over for coffee with a neighbor, your neighbor is now connected to the infected office worker that your son’s girlfriend’s mother shook hands with.

    People who break the rules and go to gatherings for whatever purpose put everyone, especially their own families and friends, at risk.

    The epidemiologists are pounding this into mayors and governors, so it’s no mystery why our leaders are getting so adamant about it.

    Also, civil rights are not absolute. Under our American system of government state and municipal governments have broad authority, plenary power, to stop activities that are a danger to the public.

    • #12
    • March 31, 2020, at 11:40 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  13. RightAngles Member

    Meanwhile in Denmark – We are in dangerous waters you guys.

    https://www.thelocal.dk/20200313/denmark-passes-far-reaching-emergency-coronavirus-law

    As well as enforcing quarantine measures, the law also allows the authorities to force people to be vaccinated, even though there is currently no vaccination for the virus.

    It also empowers them to prohibit access to public institutions, supermarkets and shops, public and private nursing homes and hospitals, and also to impose restrictions on access to public transport.

    Initially, the government wanted to the law to give the police the right to enter private homes without a court order if there is a suspicion of coronavirus infection.

    • #13
    • March 31, 2020, at 12:29 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
  14. Stad Thatcher
    Stad

    RightAngles (View Comment):
    As well as enforcing quarantine measures, the law also allows the authorities to force people to be vaccinated, even though there is currently no vaccination for the virus.

    How brilliant . . .

    • #14
    • March 31, 2020, at 12:45 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  15. Stad Thatcher
    Stad

    Roderic (View Comment):
    Also, civil rights are not absolute.

    True, but neither is the power of the state to remove those rights, even in an emergency.

    • #15
    • March 31, 2020, at 12:47 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  16. aardo vozz Member

    If only these restrictions also applied to the politicians. Sigh…

    <sarcasm off>

    <cynicism always on >

    • #16
    • March 31, 2020, at 1:50 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  17. Ralphie Member

    DonG (skeptic) (View Comment):

    But, IF it saves just ONE life….

    And remember, that one life could be Harvey Weinstein.

    • #17
    • March 31, 2020, at 1:59 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  18. Mark Camp Member

    Roderic (View Comment):

    People who break the rules and go to gatherings for whatever purpose put everyone, especially their own families and friends, at risk.

    The epidemiologists are pounding this into mayors and governors, so it’s no mystery why our leaders are getting so adamant about it.

    Also, civil rights are not absolute. Under our American system of government state and municipal governments have broad authority, plenary power, to stop activities that are a danger to the public.

    This is completely missing the point. The role of government is to protect the public. Not to protect the citizen from himself. The legitimate role of government in an epidemic is the same as at any other time: protect the public. Our medical institutions would be overwhelmed by the sudden influx of masses of seriously ill patients. It’s the government’s responsibility to try to prevent that.

    The known risks and rewards of a person’s actions to himself and his family are not the government’s concern.

    • #18
    • March 31, 2020, at 2:43 PM PDT
    • Like
  19. The Reticulator Member

    Roderic (View Comment):

    Here’s an article about why strict social distancing is so necessary, and why cheating on the rules is so dangerous to everyone.

    You should perceive your entire family to function as a single individual unit: If one person puts themselves at risk, everyone in the unit is at risk. Seemingly small social chains get large and complex with alarming speed. If your son visits his girlfriend, and you later sneak over for coffee with a neighbor, your neighbor is now connected to the infected office worker that your son’s girlfriend’s mother shook hands with.

    People who break the rules and go to gatherings for whatever purpose put everyone, especially their own families and friends, at risk.

    The epidemiologists are pounding this into mayors and governors, so it’s no mystery why our leaders are getting so adamant about it.

    Also, civil rights are not absolute. Under our American system of government state and municipal governments have broad authority, plenary power, to stop activities that are a danger to the public.

    Almost anything that anyone does can be construed as a danger to the public. For example, the concept of “harm” has been used as a justification for proposals to curtail the right to engage in deadnaming. I can make a case that your choice of beverages constitutes a danger to the public. In fact, I can make a case that the comment I’m replying to is a danger to the public.

    • #19
    • March 31, 2020, at 3:14 PM PDT
    • 6 likes
  20. Stad Thatcher
    Stad

    The Reticulator (View Comment):
    Almost anything that anyone does can be construed as a danger to the public. For example, the concept of “harm” has been used as a justification for proposals to curtail the right to engage in deadnaming. I can make a case that your choice of beverages constitutes a danger to the public. In fact, I can make a case that the comment I’m replying to is a danger to the public.

    The problem is government sees a person potentially spreading the virus as a threat. However, government should consider 1) the person might not know he has the virus, and 2) other people are out and about volutarily. They know they are taking a risk, so 100% of the burden should be on them if they get sick. Who is actually guilty of a crime? It should be the person who knows he’s infected or thinks he may be, then goes out and about.

    • #20
    • April 1, 2020, at 6:58 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  21. The Reticulator Member

    Stad (View Comment):

    The Reticulator (View Comment):
    Almost anything that anyone does can be construed as a danger to the public. For example, the concept of “harm” has been used as a justification for proposals to curtail the right to engage in deadnaming. I can make a case that your choice of beverages constitutes a danger to the public. In fact, I can make a case that the comment I’m replying to is a danger to the public.

    The problem is government sees a person potentially spreading the virus as a threat. However, government should consider 1) the person might not know he has the virus, and 2) other people are out and about volutarily. They know they are taking a risk, so 100% of the burden should be on them if they get sick. Who is actually guilty of a crime? It should be the person who knows he’s infected or thinks he may be, then goes out and about.

    Everyone who makes decisions or takes action without government approval and supervision is a threat.

    • #21
    • April 1, 2020, at 9:40 AM PDT
    • 4 likes
  22. Mark Camp Member

    The Reticulator (View Comment):
    Everyone who makes decisions or takes action without government approval and supervision is a threat.

    Good reply. This is getting right to the heart of the matter. 

    We are speaking of power over individual human lives, and power is a zero sum game: every case of increased power to government is a case of exactly the same reduction in the power of individual. 

    Every case of an individual acting without government approval is already a display of the transfer of power away from government; it is an accomplished fact. But it is also a threat, as well as an accomplished fact, because it sets a precedent that must be reversed by government if it is not to lose its grip on the current amount of power.

     

    • #22
    • April 1, 2020, at 11:47 AM PDT
    • 3 likes
  23. Ontheleftcoast Member

    Ralphie (View Comment):

    Stad (View Comment):

    iWe (View Comment):

    First we release all the criminals, because being in jail is dangerous don’cha know. Then we put normal citizens in prison!

     

    That’s been in much of the criticism, but then you add the fact the virus is starting to be found in jails and prisons.

    It could be about money; i.e. the state probably has to pay for Weinstien’s medical bills.

    Don’t forget the money from the lawsuits the ACLU would file on behalf of prisoners infected while in custody. Or taken into custody while infected. And imagine the SJWs if there were to be a racially disparate impact of COVID-19 in jail.

    Might be cheaper to close the jails, which is what the hard Left wants. It worked once with the state mental hospitals, why not with prisons and jails?

    • #23
    • April 1, 2020, at 5:54 PM PDT
    • 1 like
  24. Ray Gunner Coolidge

    Addiction Is A Choice (View Comment):

    Limbaugh is right: The reason the Left loves tyrants like Castro so much? They’re jealous of their power!

    So right! And I have long wondered about this. Where exactly does the desire to tyrannize over others come from? Is there a tyrant gene? Do parents raise their children to be tyrants?

    The best I’ve been able to figure is that the desire to tyrannize arises when one fully gives in to the sin of anger. And I’ve noticed the Left is always angry. 

    • #24
    • April 1, 2020, at 9:16 PM PDT
    • 3 likes
  25. Stad Thatcher
    Stad

    Ontheleftcoast (View Comment):
    Might be cheaper to close the jails, which is what the hard Left wants. It worked once with the state mental hospitals, why not with prisons and jails?

    You know, it’s inhumane to lock people up in cages like wild animals. Oh wait, many of them are wild animals . . .

    • #25
    • April 2, 2020, at 6:08 AM PDT
    • Like
  26. Nick Plosser Coolidge

    https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2020/03/31/coronavirus-los-angeles-eric-garcetti-snitches-get-rewards/

    And not to be outdone…

    • #26
    • April 2, 2020, at 6:48 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  27. The Reticulator Member

    NickP (View Comment):

    https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2020/03/31/coronavirus-los-angeles-eric-garcetti-snitches-get-rewards/

    And not to be outdone…

    That includes having all construction sites submit a comprehensive COVID-19 exposure control plan that includes protocols for symptom checking, physical distancing, hygiene practices and decontamination procedures.

    Best to hire Guido to draw up your plan for you. His company knows how to do these things and get them approved. Also, he’s the mayor’s cousin and has connections.

    I’m not saying that’s what’s happening in this case, but that sort of thing has been known to occur in cases where a business needs to submit a “plan” in order to be allowed to do business.

    I’m not automatically against regulation, but I’m almost automatically against that form of regulation.

    • #27
    • April 2, 2020, at 6:53 AM PDT
    • 1 like
  28. Nick Plosser Coolidge

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    NickP (View Comment):

    https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2020/03/31/coronavirus-los-angeles-eric-garcetti-snitches-get-rewards/

    And not to be outdone…

    That includes having all construction sites submit a comprehensive COVID-19 exposure control plan that includes protocols for symptom checking, physical distancing, hygiene practices and decontamination procedures.

    Best to hire Guido to draw up your plan for you. His company knows how to do these things and get them approved. Also, he’s the mayor’s cousin and has connections.

    I’m not saying that’s what’s happening in this case, but that sort of thing has been known to occur in cases where a business needs to submit a “plan” in order to be allowed to do business.

    I’m not automatically against regulation, but I’m almost automatically against that form of regulation.

    Spot on. 

    • #28
    • April 2, 2020, at 7:02 AM PDT
    • Like
  29. Nick Plosser Coolidge

    https://globalnews.ca/news/6766063/regina-police-tip-line-self-isolating/?fbclid=IwAR18Mjq9HH2u7p43X4cJpaAdzoX4cAMeMseRI98AjjvPJpEViqsZiJ04kZI

    Our northern neighbors getting in on the act.

    • #29
    • April 2, 2020, at 7:05 AM PDT
    • 1 like
    • This comment has been edited.
  30. Stad Thatcher
    Stad

    NickP (View Comment):

    https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2020/03/31/coronavirus-los-angeles-eric-garcetti-snitches-get-rewards/

    And not to be outdone…

    The Stasi is alive and well in LA . . .

    • #30
    • April 2, 2020, at 7:11 AM PDT
    • 2 likes