It Ain’t Over Yet: Part Two

 

Yesterday, the Republicans held a primary in Louisiana and caucused in Kansas, Kentucky, and Maine. Ted Cruz stomped Donald Trump in Kansas and defeated him handily in Maine. In Louisiana, he lost to Trump by 3.6 percent, and in Kentucky, Trump beat him by 4.3 percent. Marco Rubio came in a distant third everywhere but Maine, where John Kasich forced him into fourth.

What we have here in states where only Republicans can vote in the primary or caucus is a real horse race, and that, I believe, is what we are going to see down the line. In Rubio’s absence — and I suspect that he will soon be absent — Cruz may well snatch victory from the jaws of defeat. Stay tuned!

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  1. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    What this thread shows is that there are people who are way too influenced by the images that the MSM wants them to see.

    • #181
  2. HVTs Inactive
    HVTs
    @HVTs

    The Reticulator:

    BThompson:Cruz does bot come off as ugly and honest. He comes across as creepily earnest, calculated, affected, and insincere.

    This is untrue.

    “What is truth?” (John 18:38)   {:-)

    • #182
  3. HVTs Inactive
    HVTs
    @HVTs

    The Reticulator:What this thread shows is that there are people who are way too influenced by the images that the MSM wants them to see.

    Have to slightly disagree.  MSM just wants our eyeballs seeing their images . . . what the images are is driven by what they know from trial and error we want.  Consumer demand rules.  We’ve become fundamentally shallow . . . call it the Kardashian effect.  “More cleavage, please!”  MSM serves the need, it doesn’t create it.  It plays to our laziness, shallowness, lustfulness . . . sure, but we’ve got to own that laziness and shallowness, etc.

    None of the foregoing applies to the Ricochetti . . . of course!

    • #183
  4. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    HVTs:

    The Reticulator:What this thread shows is that there are people who are way too influenced by the images that the MSM wants them to see.

    Have to slightly disagree. MSM just wants our eyeballs seeing their images . . . what the images are is driven by what they know from trial and error we want. Consumer demand rules. We’ve become fundamentally shallow . . . call it the Kardashian effect. “More cleavage, please!” MSM serves the need, it doesn’t create it. It plays to our laziness, shallowness, lustfulness . . . sure, but we’ve got to own that laziness and shallowness, etc.

    None of the foregoing applies to the Ricochetti . . . of course!

    It’s a balancing act.  They need to promote their evil ideology in order to give their worthless lives a sense of purpose, but they also need to provide enough of what will get people to pay for it.

    I stay immune by not watching TV except for helping Mrs. Reticulator watch Big Ten football and basketball.  So I’m about to get my annual television fix.  She’s talking about cutting back our cable subscription as soon as the NCAA championship is over.

    • #184
  5. donald todd Inactive
    donald todd
    @donaldtodd

    The Reticulator:

    donald todd:

    Paul A. Rahe:

    Cruz has made no such blunders . . . so far.

    Finding no support with his fellow Senators might be considered a blunder by some of us. Being at odds with the majority leader of the Senate might be considered, should one have to work with others to accomplish things.

    It probably accounts for his staying power.

    There is something to be said for that, unless he is elected and then must get things done.  That is when staying power will count.

    • #185
  6. donald todd Inactive
    donald todd
    @donaldtodd

    katievs:

    HVTs:

    donald todd: ed may win the Republican nomination but he seems to have the same draw as Mitt and we know how that ended up.

    I think most people think of Mitt and Ted as rather opposite ends of the GOP spectrum, despite Mitt’s feeble and failed attempt to re-position himself as a conservative. As Jonah Goldberg says, conservatism was always a second language for Romney . . . one can’t say that about Ted Cruz.

    Yes, exactly.

    I’m also beginning to think Rubio’s charm might be backfiring. People don’t like feeling like they’re being taken in by a charmer. They’d rather have ugly and honest.

    Ugly and …  Ugly is Hillary!  Ugly and honest?  I assume that is Cruz.  The Donald is somewhere between those choices but on the fence he is the best.

    • #186
  7. donald todd Inactive
    donald todd
    @donaldtodd

    katievs:

    BThompson:Cruz does bot come off as ugly and honest.

    Well, I think he’s ugly.

    I also think he’s sincere. He’s the real deal. See Greg Abbott’s endorsement. See Jay Nordlinger. See Glenn Beck and Mark Levin. These are all people who mean it, and who don’t suffer fools.

    There are people who think Beck and Levin are fools, wrapped in orbit around their own thinking.

    • #187
  8. BThompson Inactive
    BThompson
    @BThompson

    Paul A. Rahe:

    Let me repeat something. Marco Rubio was swept into office in 2010 by the very folks who seem disinclined to vote for him now. Electable? If he were running for the Senate in Florida, he would not be electable.

    I just thought I’d leave this here for a little light reading.

    Rubio gets highest job approval rating in new Florida poll

    • #188
  9. BThompson Inactive
    BThompson
    @BThompson

    Paul A. Rahe:

    The Tarrance polls is an outlier, and it was not taken by a respected polling outfit. It was arranged by a group formed to support Marco Rubio and blast Trump. It is, to say the least, suspect.

    Another little interesting tidbit, submitted for people’s consideration.

    Rubio closing gap in Florida, dominating early voting.

    • #189
  10. Tuck Inactive
    Tuck
    @Tuck

    BThompson:Another little interesting tidbit, submitted for people’s consideration.

    Rubio closing gap in Florida, dominating early voting.

    Not surprising.

    In addition, for what it’s worth, veteran Republican political consultant Stuart Stevens has pointed out that in the history of the modern Puerto Rico primary, every winner has also won Florida. Given Florida’s large Hispanic population, including many Puerto Ricans, this isn’t entirely a coincidence”

    • #190
  11. HVTs Inactive
    HVTs
    @HVTs

    BThompson:

    Paul A. Rahe:

    Let me repeat something. Marco Rubio was swept into office in 2010 by the very folks who seem disinclined to vote for him now. Electable? If he were running for the Senate in Florida, he would not be electable.

    I just thought I’d leave this here for a little light reading.

    Rubio gets highest job approval rating in new Florida poll

    Thanks for the update . . . it’s really good to know that a “new” poll from AUGUST shows 43% of Floridians disapprove of Rubio’s performance in the Senate.  Now I’m on the edge of my seat to discover how he did in September.

    • #191
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