What Cookware Is the Best?

 

Spilling over from Susan’s post on Kamala’s recent cookware purchases is a minor debate on what cookware works the best, for what purpose, and at what price. @doctorrobert, @kedavis, and @jimmcconnell have already commented. But what do you think? I suppose I started the digression with this comment:

I confess to you, I have one of these. I’ve only used it once to fry a single egg. I told my wife before l’affaire Kamala that she might as well start using it — we’re not getting any younger.

Mauviel Copper M'200 CI Fry Pan

Mauviel Copper M’200 CI Fry Pan

Select : 12″

$435  (It was much cheaper when I bought it.)

Williams-Sonoma many years ago. Up ’til now it’s just been too special to use.

What is your favorite skillet, chicken fryer, or saucepan?

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  1. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    I should probably reprise my own comments too:

    I would call that a sauté pan rather than fryer, as far as I’m concerned a frying pan needs straight sides.

    Although you can fry an egg in pretty much anything.

    I got a small Tramontina set at Walmart a few years ago when I couldn’t find Wearever in any nearby store. It was pretty good, and I still use it; my only real complaint has been that the cover for the “Dutch Oven” (which also came with a locking-in pasta strainer) doesn’t also fit the straight-side “frying pan.” The frying pan needs a good cover when making, for example, Hamburger Helper. :-)

    In the course of feeding stray cats and getting them fixed while living in Phoenix up until last year, I also checked for discarded treasures in the dumpsters.  There were a lot of opportunities, since there were over 300 units in the condo complex, and if some people got evicted for not paying their rent (I owned mine) or went to jail or something, the landlords would typically just throw out everything left behind.  I’d find working computers, monitors (such as the 22″ Dell that I’m using now), even perfectly fine laptops, cell phones, wifi hot-spots (one T-Mobile was apparently new in box), and, of course:  cookware!

    I’ve gotten some nice Calphalon and others, including some very nice large stainless steel (pasta?) pots; also some Wolfgang Puck heavy stainless steel…  I’ve found it all to be pretty good for my purposes, I get to try a variety of different brands, and it saves me a chunk of money over buying my own.  Other brands might be “better,” but when it comes to something that’s free, it really only has to be better than nothing. :-)

    • #1
  2. Django Member
    Django
    @Django

    How about another debate: Cast iron vs. carbon steel? And proper seasoning method for each.

    • #2
  3. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Yer all a buncha feebs.

    • #3
  4. EHerring Coolidge
    EHerring
    @EHerring

    I love to cook single eggs in a small cast iron skillet I inherited from my great aunts.

    • #4
  5. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Django (View Comment):

    How about another debate: Cast iron vs. carbon steel? And proper seasoning method for each.

    You’re on, but I don’t know that I can add much.  When I moved 15 years ago, I left all? my cast iron behind.  And one was a four quart straight-sided chicken fryer.  I do miss that.  Despite @doctorrobert‘s recommendation of Swiss Diamond being great, I just didn’t trust the finish to last (perhaps wrongly) and bought carbon steel, and they work fine as non-stick.  Also they heat evenly and very quickly, and I can control the temperature minutely.  But they are very heavy and my wife doesn’t like using them.  In fact I did pick up a used 15 1/2″ diameter, with handle 27 1/2 inch long used steel skillet overseas and it cost more than the I paid for the skillet to buy the duffle bag to bring it home.  (That trip I also bought a retired church bell that required its own suitcase as well.  50 pounds allowance per suitcase fills quite quickly.)

    I use cast iron for baking but since I don’t cook over wood fires I use enameled cast iron.  It’s pretty close to non-stick.

    As for seasoning steel, I don’t have the patience for sanding with salt and baking for hours, so I just use oil when I cook until the skillet becomes naturally seasoned.

    • #5
  6. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    EHerring (View Comment):

    I love to cook single eggs in a small cast iron skillet I inherited from my great aunts.

    Cast iron has stood the test of centuries.  And it’s not uncommon to find a used cast iron skillet that is a hundred years old.  About your eggs: Scrambled or fried?

    And do you wash it with soap?  Just curious.

    • #6
  7. EHerring Coolidge
    EHerring
    @EHerring

    Flicker (View Comment):

    EHerring (View Comment):

    I love to cook single eggs in a small cast iron skillet I inherited from my great aunts.

    Cast iron has stood the test of centuries. And it’s not uncommon to find a used cast iron skillet that is a hundred years old. About your eggs: Scrambled or fried?

    And do you wash it with soap? Just curious.

    Noooooo!

    • #7
  8. Django Member
    Django
    @Django

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Django (View Comment):

    How about another debate: Cast iron vs. carbon steel? And proper seasoning method for each.

    You’re on, but I don’t know that I can add much. When I moved 15 years ago, I left all? my cast iron behind. And one was a four quart straight-sided chicken fryer. I do miss that. Despite @ doctorrobert‘s recommendation of Swiss Diamond being great, I just didn’t trust the finish to last (perhaps wrongly) and bought carbon steel, and they work fine as non-stick. Also they heat evenly and very quickly, and I can control the temperature minutely. But they are very heavy and my wife doesn’t like using them. In fact I did pick up a used 15 1/2″ diameter, with handle 27 1/2 inch long used steel skillet overseas and it cost more than the I paid for the skillet to buy the duffle bag to bring it home. (That trip I also bought a retired church bell that required its own suitcase as well. 50 pounds allowance per suitcase fills quite quickly.)

    I use cast iron for baking but since I don’t cook over wood fires I use enameled cast iron. It’s pretty close to non-stick.

    As for seasoning steel, I don’t have the patience for sanding with salt and baking for hours, so I just use oil when I cook until the skillet becomes naturally seasoned.

    I’m not an expert, so I don’t have much to add. I own an old Wagner cast iron skillet, but the sides are so deep it’s almost a deep fryer. Nice, heavy tempered glass lid. I have a de Buyer carbon steel pan that gets used a lot. Not quite non-stick but close enough. Both are heavy; both hold heat very well after they heat up. Both brown meats and chicken well. I have a couple All-Clad “D5” sauce pans that work well when making Puttanesca sauce. 

    • #8
  9. EHerring Coolidge
    EHerring
    @EHerring

    Be careful with heavy cast iron on glass tops. 

    • #9
  10. Vince Guerra Member
    Vince Guerra
    @VinceGuerra

    Flicker (View Comment):

    EHerring (View Comment):

    I love to cook single eggs in a small cast iron skillet I inherited from my great aunts.

    Cast iron has stood the test of centuries. And it’s not uncommon to find a used cast iron skillet that is a hundred years old. About your eggs: Scrambled or fried?

    And do you wash it with soap? Just curious.

    You don’t wash cast iron with soap, just hot water and a good non-ebrasive scrubbing sponge or plastic scrapper. You dry them by placing them wet over the burner and letting them heat to dry.

    We use cast iron for just about everything meat and vegetable. The key is lots of butter. I use steel pans for sauces, risotto, and for shallow frying things like Mexican food or dumplings etc… We also use a wok for Asian stuff.

    • #10
  11. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    EHerring (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    EHerring (View Comment):

    I love to cook single eggs in a small cast iron skillet I inherited from my great aunts.

    Cast iron has stood the test of centuries. And it’s not uncommon to find a used cast iron skillet that is a hundred years old. About your eggs: Scrambled or fried?

    And do you wash it with soap? Just curious.

    Noooooo!

    I like your passion.

    • #11
  12. EHerring Coolidge
    EHerring
    @EHerring

    Flicker (View Comment):

    EHerring (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    EHerring (View Comment):

    I love to cook single eggs in a small cast iron skillet I inherited from my great aunts.

    Cast iron has stood the test of centuries. And it’s not uncommon to find a used cast iron skillet that is a hundred years old. About your eggs: Scrambled or fried?

    And do you wash it with soap? Just curious.

    Noooooo!

    I like your passion.

    I am especially passionate when I learn from my mistakes. 

    • #12
  13. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Django (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Django (View Comment):

    How about another debate: Cast iron vs. carbon steel? And proper seasoning method for each.

    You’re on, but I don’t know that I can add much. When I moved 15 years ago, I left all? my cast iron behind. And one was a four quart straight-sided chicken fryer. I do miss that. Despite @ doctorrobert‘s recommendation of Swiss Diamond being great, I just didn’t trust the finish to last (perhaps wrongly) and bought carbon steel, and they work fine as non-stick. Also they heat evenly and very quickly, and I can control the temperature minutely. But they are very heavy and my wife doesn’t like using them. In fact I did pick up a used 15 1/2″ diameter, with handle 27 1/2 inch long used steel skillet overseas and it cost more than the I paid for the skillet to buy the duffle bag to bring it home. (That trip I also bought a retired church bell that required its own suitcase as well. 50 pounds allowance per suitcase fills quite quickly.)

    I use cast iron for baking but since I don’t cook over wood fires I use enameled cast iron. It’s pretty close to non-stick.

    As for seasoning steel, I don’t have the patience for sanding with salt and baking for hours, so I just use oil when I cook until the skillet becomes naturally seasoned.

    I’m not an expert, so I don’t have much to add. I own an old Wagner cast iron skillet, but the sides are so deep it’s almost a deep fryer. Nice, heavy tempered glass lid. I have a de Buyer carbon steel pan that gets used a lot. Not quite non-stick but close enough. Both are heavy; both hold heat very well after they heat up. Both brown meats and chicken well. I have a couple All-Clad “D5” sauce pans that work well when making Puttanesca sauce.

    Puttanesca sauce.  Hmm.  What does that mean?  But I do love olives and anchovies.

    And yes, All-Clad stays on the stove pretty much all the time.  My wife destroys a teflon skillet twice a year.

    And yeah, carbon steel is great for steak, eggs and flash sautéing but I don’t use them for acidic foods like tomato sauce.  For that I use my single purpose SS chicken fryer (Tramontina 5qt.) and a fine splatter screen.  But as I’ve said elsewhere I cook oil based sauce rendered to just tomato solids, herbs and the now-flavored oil (which when finished is an orangey red).  I cook quickly over high heat, so it takes as long to bring the sauce to a boil as it does to cook it and render out all the water.

    • #13
  14. Vince Guerra Member
    Vince Guerra
    @VinceGuerra

    Flicker (View Comment):
    My wife destroys a teflon skillet twice a year.

    Friends don’t let friends cook with teflon. 

    • #14
  15. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    EHerring (View Comment):

    Be careful with heavy cast iron on glass tops.

    My stoves are gas, and my kitchen counters are concrete topped with granite tile.  I can put a hot skillet down on it, and I’m so glad we don’t have Formica.

    • #15
  16. Django Member
    Django
    @Django

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Django (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Django (View Comment):

    How about another debate: Cast iron vs. carbon steel? And proper seasoning method for each.

    You’re on, but I don’t know that I can add much. When I moved 15 years ago, I left all? my cast iron behind. And one was a four quart straight-sided chicken fryer. I do miss that. Despite @ doctorrobert‘s recommendation of Swiss Diamond being great, I just didn’t trust the finish to last (perhaps wrongly) and bought carbon steel, and they work fine as non-stick. Also they heat evenly and very quickly, and I can control the temperature minutely. But they are very heavy and my wife doesn’t like using them. In fact I did pick up a used 15 1/2″ diameter, with handle 27 1/2 inch long used steel skillet overseas and it cost more than the I paid for the skillet to buy the duffle bag to bring it home. (That trip I also bought a retired church bell that required its own suitcase as well. 50 pounds allowance per suitcase fills quite quickly.)

    As for seasoning steel, I don’t have the patience for sanding with salt and baking for hours, so I just use oil when I cook until the skillet becomes naturally seasoned.

    I’m not an expert, so I don’t have much to add. I own an old Wagner cast iron skillet, but the sides are so deep it’s almost a deep fryer. Nice, heavy tempered glass lid. I have a de Buyer carbon steel pan that gets used a lot. Not quite non-stick but close enough. Both are heavy; both hold heat very well after they heat up. Both brown meats and chicken well. I have a couple All-Clad “D5” sauce pans that work well when making Puttanesca sauce.

    Puttanesca sauce. Hmm. What does that mean? But I do love olives and anchovies.

    And yes, All-Clad stays on the stove pretty much all the time. My wife destroys a teflon skillet twice a year.

    And yeah, carbon steel is great for steak, eggs and flash sautéing but I don’t use them for acidic foods like tomato sauce. For that I use my single purpose SS chicken fryer (Tramontina 5qt.) and a fine splatter screen. But as I’ve said elsewhere I cook oil based sauce rendered to just tomato solids, herbs and the now-flavored oil (which when finished is an orangey red). I cook quickly over high heat, so it takes as long to bring the sauce to a boil as it does to cook it and render out all the water.

    Named for the ladies of the evening in Palermo who offered the full GFE. Or so the legend goes. And don’t forget the garlic and capers. 

    • #16
  17. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Vince Guerra (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    EHerring (View Comment):

    I love to cook single eggs in a small cast iron skillet I inherited from my great aunts.

    Cast iron has stood the test of centuries. And it’s not uncommon to find a used cast iron skillet that is a hundred years old. About your eggs: Scrambled or fried?

    And do you wash it with soap? Just curious.

    You don’t was cast iron with soap, just hot water and a good non-ebrasive scrubbing sponge or plastic scrapper. You dry them by placing them wet over the burner and letting them heat to dry.

    We use cast iron for just about everything meat and vegetable. The key is lots of butter. I use steel pans for sauces, risotto, and for shallow frying things like Mexican food or dumplings etc… We also use a wok for Asian stuff.

    I was raised on Revere Ware pots and pans and cast iron skillets (and free knives from the Sinclair gas station).  This may sound like sacrilege but my mother never missed an opportunity to wash the skillet thoroughly with detergent.  Still over the years the surface became very smooth and my father also became a very accomplished hand with butter.

    • #17
  18. Django Member
    Django
    @Django

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Vince Guerra (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    EHerring (View Comment):

    I love to cook single eggs in a small cast iron skillet I inherited from my great aunts.

    Cast iron has stood the test of centuries. And it’s not uncommon to find a used cast iron skillet that is a hundred years old. About your eggs: Scrambled or fried?

    And do you wash it with soap? Just curious.

    You don’t was cast iron with soap, just hot water and a good non-ebrasive scrubbing sponge or plastic scrapper. You dry them by placing them wet over the burner and letting them heat to dry.

    We use cast iron for just about everything meat and vegetable. The key is lots of butter. I use steel pans for sauces, risotto, and for shallow frying things like Mexican food or dumplings etc… We also use a wok for Asian stuff.

    I was raised on Revere Ware pots and pans and cast iron skillets (and free knives from the Sinclair gas station). This may sound like sacrilege but my mother never missed an opportunity to wash the skillet thoroughly with detergent. Still over the years the surface became very smooth and my father also because a very accomplished hand with butter.

    I’ve heard the claim that modern dishwashing liquids have no lye component. The practice of never using soap dated from earlier. 

    • #18
  19. JosePluma, Local Man of Mystery Thatcher
    JosePluma, Local Man of Mystery
    @JosePluma

    Flicker (View Comment):

    EHerring (View Comment):

    I love to cook single eggs in a small cast iron skillet I inherited from my great aunts.

    Cast iron has stood the test of centuries. And it’s not uncommon to find a used cast iron skillet that is a hundred years old. About your eggs: Scrambled or fried?

    And do you wash it with soap? Just curious.

    Wipe it out, put a tiny layer of water in it.   Put it on the stove until the water boils.  Dump the water and wipe it again.  Don’t let soap anywhere near it.

    • #19
  20. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Django (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Django (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    You’re on, but I don’t know that I can add much. When I moved 15 years ago, I left all? my cast iron behind. And one was a four quart straight-sided chicken fryer. I do miss that. Despite @ doctorrobert‘s recommendation of Swiss Diamond being great, I just didn’t trust the finish to last (perhaps wrongly) and bought carbon steel, and they work fine as non-stick. Also they heat evenly and very quickly, and I can control the temperature minutely. But they are very heavy and my wife doesn’t like using them. In fact I did pick up a used 15 1/2″ diameter, with handle 27 1/2 inch long used steel skillet overseas and it cost more than the I paid for the skillet to buy the duffle bag to bring it home. (That trip I also bought a retired church bell that required its own suitcase as well. 50 pounds allowance per suitcase fills quite quickly.)

    As for seasoning steel, I don’t have the patience for sanding with salt and baking for hours, so I just use oil when I cook until the skillet becomes naturally seasoned.

    I’m not an expert, so I don’t have much to add. I own an old Wagner cast iron skillet, but the sides are so deep it’s almost a deep fryer. Nice, heavy tempered glass lid. I have a de Buyer carbon steel pan that gets used a lot. Not quite non-stick but close enough. Both are heavy; both hold heat very well after they heat up. Both brown meats and chicken well. I have a couple All-Clad “D5” sauce pans that work well when making Puttanesca sauce.

    Puttanesca sauce. Hmm. What does that mean? But I do love olives and anchovies.

    And yes, All-Clad stays on the stove pretty much all the time. My wife destroys a teflon skillet twice a year.

    And yeah, carbon steel is great for steak, eggs and flash sautéing but I don’t use them for acidic foods like tomato sauce. For that I use my single purpose SS chicken fryer (Tramontina 5qt.) and a fine splatter screen. But as I’ve said elsewhere I cook oil based sauce rendered to just tomato solids, herbs and the now-flavored oil (which when finished is an orangey red). I cook quickly over high heat, so it takes as long to bring the sauce to a boil as it does to cook it and render out all the water.

    Named for the ladies of the evening in Palermo who offered the full GFE. Or so the legend goes. And don’t forget the garlic and capers.

    But of course!  It goes without saying.

    And now I know why Palermo is my favorite city (not for the street walkers).

    • #20
  21. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnell
    @JimMcConnell

    Percival (View Comment):

    Yer all a buncha feebs.

    Right. All you need is a cast iron Dutch oven, it’s do anything that’s worth doing, including great cornbread.

    • #21
  22. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Vince Guerra (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):
    My wife destroys a teflon skillet twice a year.

    Friends don’t let friends cook with teflon.

    Eh, she insists.  But we’re not dying yet.  We do have better non-sticky skillets but for some reason she pretty much insists on teflon.  Maybe I can yet change her mind.

    • #22
  23. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Vince Guerra (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):
    My wife destroys a teflon skillet twice a year.

    Friends don’t let friends cook with teflon.

    Eh, she insists. But we’re not dying yet. We do have better non-sticky skillets but for some reason she pretty much insists on teflon. Maybe I can yet change her mind.

    Teflon is so 1970s.  How about something modern like Granitestone?

    Maybe Teflon explains falling birth-rates etc, like the Romans didn’t know their aqueducts were giving them lead poisoning.

    • #23
  24. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    Django (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Vince Guerra (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    EHerring (View Comment):

    I love to cook single eggs in a small cast iron skillet I inherited from my great aunts.

    Cast iron has stood the test of centuries. And it’s not uncommon to find a used cast iron skillet that is a hundred years old. About your eggs: Scrambled or fried?

    And do you wash it with soap? Just curious.

    You don’t was cast iron with soap, just hot water and a good non-ebrasive scrubbing sponge or plastic scrapper. You dry them by placing them wet over the burner and letting them heat to dry.

    We use cast iron for just about everything meat and vegetable. The key is lots of butter. I use steel pans for sauces, risotto, and for shallow frying things like Mexican food or dumplings etc… We also use a wok for Asian stuff.

    I was raised on Revere Ware pots and pans and cast iron skillets (and free knives from the Sinclair gas station). This may sound like sacrilege but my mother never missed an opportunity to wash the skillet thoroughly with detergent. Still over the years the surface became very smooth and my father also because a very accomplished hand with butter.

    I’ve heard the claim that modern dishwashing liquids have no lye component. The practice of never using soap dated from earlier.

    Really?  I thought the problem was removing the oil products.

    • #24
  25. Django Member
    Django
    @Django

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Django (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Vince Guerra (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    EHerring (View Comment):

    I love to cook single eggs in a small cast iron skillet I inherited from my great aunts.

    Cast iron has stood the test of centuries. And it’s not uncommon to find a used cast iron skillet that is a hundred years old. About your eggs: Scrambled or fried?

    And do you wash it with soap? Just curious.

    You don’t was cast iron with soap, just hot water and a good non-ebrasive scrubbing sponge or plastic scrapper. You dry them by placing them wet over the burner and letting them heat to dry.

    We use cast iron for just about everything meat and vegetable. The key is lots of butter. I use steel pans for sauces, risotto, and for shallow frying things like Mexican food or dumplings etc… We also use a wok for Asian stuff.

    I was raised on Revere Ware pots and pans and cast iron skillets (and free knives from the Sinclair gas station). This may sound like sacrilege but my mother never missed an opportunity to wash the skillet thoroughly with detergent. Still over the years the surface became very smooth and my father also because a very accomplished hand with butter.

    I’ve heard the claim that modern dishwashing liquids have no lye component. The practice of never using soap dated from earlier.

    Really? I thought the problem was removing the oil products.

    Did the guy know what he was talking about? No idea, but he said that modern detergents used sparingly don’t remove the seasoning, but the old lye soaps did. 

    • #25
  26. EHerring Coolidge
    EHerring
    @EHerring

    Django (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Django (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    Vince Guerra (View Comment):

    Flicker (View Comment):

    EHerring (View Comment):

    I love to cook single eggs in a small cast iron skillet I inherited from my great aunts.

    Cast iron has stood the test of centuries. And it’s not uncommon to find a used cast iron skillet that is a hundred years old. About your eggs: Scrambled or fried?

    And do you wash it with soap? Just curious.

    You don’t was cast iron with soap, just hot water and a good non-ebrasive scrubbing sponge or plastic scrapper. You dry them by placing them wet over the burner and letting them heat to dry.

    We use cast iron for just about everything meat and vegetable. The key is lots of butter. I use steel pans for sauces, risotto, and for shallow frying things like Mexican food or dumplings etc… We also use a wok for Asian stuff.

    I was raised on Revere Ware pots and pans and cast iron skillets (and free knives from the Sinclair gas station). This may sound like sacrilege but my mother never missed an opportunity to wash the skillet thoroughly with detergent. Still over the years the surface became very smooth and my father also because a very accomplished hand with butter.

    I’ve heard the claim that modern dishwashing liquids have no lye component. The practice of never using soap dated from earlier.

    Really? I thought the problem was removing the oil products.

    Did the guy know what he was talking about? No idea, but he said that modern detergents used sparingly don’t remove the seasoning, but the old lye soaps did.

    He must not use Dawn.

    • #26
  27. Flicker Coolidge
    Flicker
    @Flicker

    kedavis (View Comment):
    Teflon is so 1970s.  How about something modern like Granitestone?

    Isn’t granitestone a ceramic coating?  I have tried ceramics but they didn’t last either.  That’s why I went to carbon steel.

    • #27
  28. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Flicker (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    Teflon is so 1970s. How about something modern like Granitestone?

    Isn’t granitestone a ceramic coating? I have tried ceramics but they didn’t last either. That’s why I went to carbon steel.

    I don’t think it’s “only” ceramic but I haven’t checked in detail.  I’ve tried other ceramic-lined cookware that was disappointing but that was rather early in the ceramic craze.  Granitestone seems to be different.  There’s a couple others too, diamond-infused, copper-infused…  I’m not very aggressive with cookware, but the Tramontina non-stick set I got has held up well.

    • #28
  29. Percival Thatcher
    Percival
    @Percival

    Jim McConnell (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    Yer all a buncha feebs.

    Right. All you need is a cast iron Dutch oven, it’s do anything that’s worth doing, including great cornbread.

    Toss in a cast iron skillet, and you are pretty much done.

    • #29
  30. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    Not cookware, but prompted by “we’re not getting any younger, ” so we might as well use it is our Wedgwood China. Since realizing that neither of our kids had any interest in inheriting it, we decided we might as well use it, and not save it for special occasions. We even (horrors!) Put it in the dishwasher. 

    • #30