Truth About Christopher Columbus, Italians, Catholics, and Indigenous Peoples

 

“I do not intend to prejudge the past.” — William Whitelaw

There’s a right way to do an Indigenous People’s Day and a wrong way.

The right way to do Indigenous People’s Day is to host a celebration of them, where all their cultural markers are observed.

The wrong way is to spend most of the event haranguing Italian Americans for celebrating Columbus, which is what many of these events turn out to be. These celebrations are not run by Native Americans, rather by people with political axes to grind. They often degrade into anti-American, anti-Italian, and even anti-Catholic speeches.

Good grief, that’s no way to celebrate Indigenous people.

Indigenous People’s Day was created by the UN and has been celebrated on August 9 for decades. November is Native American Heritage Month. This push by political confrontationists to move it to Columbus Day serves no purpose other than to pit Indigenous People against Italian Catholics in a fight neither of them asked to have.

The organizers find themselves in interesting historical company. The first to oppose Columbus Day in America was the Ku Klux Klan. White supremacists have always hated Catholics and Italians and they lynched us. In fact, the largest mass lynching in American history was of Italian men.

Some people don’t understand the Italian penchant to celebrate Columbus because of the confusion over celebrating the Conquista (we don’t) and celebrating an Italian explorer (we do). Columbus had nothing to do with the Conquista.

In Hispanic countries, Columbus Day was about the Conquista — the conquest by Spain (not Italy) of the Western Hemisphere. That’s understandable since the bloodline of many people there lead back to Spain. It’s also understandable that the Indigenous People in Hispanic countries might not celebrate that — they were conquered. However, 500 years and 30 generations of intermarrying ought to have healed that wound a bit.

In America, Columbus Day is not even slightly about the Conquista of the natives. Columbus, who died in 1506 before the Conquista occurred, was Italian and an unparalleled heroic admiral. As Italian Americans and Caholics, we take pride that his maritime exploits led to the eventuality of the greatest country on earth, the United States of America. That’s right, an Italian’s vision did that and we thank God we are here.

Nothing against the Spanish, but we aren’t them. Italy didn’t conquer this hemisphere 500 years ago, Spain did. We don’t celebrate that; we celebrate Columbus, the man who had nothing to do with the conquest. He never even conquered the Caribbean, where he landed. He died thinking he was in the East Indies.

Yet the hate of these organizers of Indigenous celebrations is directed not at the Spanish (nor should it be), but at Italians. For what? Well, that has to do with American leftist politics.

Hispanic people are considered minorities, non-white and therefore unassailable. Italians, who suffered a history of ethnic discrimination in jobs and housing, were abruptly declared to be “white people” when Affirmative Action was developed, so we couldn’t take part in it. Now, when the left complains of “white people,” that means we Italians are the very people who discriminated against us. As if we did it to ourselves. Yes – identity politics is just that circular and fallacious.

Some of the rhetoric toward Italians is hateful.

First, there is an attempt to make European Italians better people than Italian-Americans by wrongly pointing out a lack of Columbus support in Italy. At one event last year, a speaker claimed there is not one Columbus statue in all of Italy.

She’s right there is “not one” statue of Columbus in Italy. There are 70 statues of Columbus in Italy. Italy celebrates the day every year as Giornata nazionale di Cristoforo Colombo. The speaker was simply lying.

Apparently, Italian Americans are as good as people everywhere. Columbus Day has been celebrated in Spain, Italy, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, Venezuela, Costa Rica, Chile, Mexico, and in the Caribbean. More than 30 countries have statues of Columbus, and there are hundreds of them in total, as far away as Egypt and Japan. They are celebrating an Italian explorer, not a Spanish Conquista.

The Irish Governor of New Jersey, Phil Murphy, quipped after a Columbus statue was torn down that Italians can just find some other Italian to celebrate. You know Phil, every Italian I know on March 17 puts on a green shirt and celebrates with his Irish neighbors. Never would we be so dismissive, so rude, as to insist on changes to their ethnic culture. Many of the speeches surrounding Indigenous People’s Day often tell Italians to change our culture, telling us to “go celebrate Frank Sinatra or something.”

Columbus is the most lied about historical figure. He was not involved in genocide, slavery, or rape as many event organizers and the Internet faux-history machine allege. The historical source documents from his time prove that. Let’s compare the usual lies about Columbus to the truth:

  • The lie: They claim Columbus ended his time in the West when he was arrested and jailed by Spain for abuses toward the natives.
    The truth: Spain sent Francisco de Bobadilla to investigate claims Columbus was not fair to the Spanish settlers; he was favoring the natives. The day after he arrived, with no investigation, he made up stories about native abuses, arrested Columbus, and declared himself Governor. The Crown discovered de Bobadilla was lying, reinstated Columbus as Admiral, and arrested de Bobadilla. How disingenuous to leave that out! It would be like saying Nelson Mandela was a convict but not telling the rest of his story.
  • The lie: They said Columbus was a slave trader.
    The truth: After his first landing Columbus left 39 men at a camp he called La Navidad. When he returned, he found one Taino Indian faction massacred all of them. Columbus went to war with that faction, and another Taino faction helped Columbus. Pursuant to the rules of war, he took 500 POWs, which could be converted to slaves. The Queen detested slavery as opposed to her Catholicism and stopped the practice of selling POWs as slaves.
  • The lie: Columbus took slaves himself.
    The truth: In Spain, there was a labor system called “encomienda” which was not slavery. In the New World, it was a system of exchanges that allowed the natives to be paid for work and other benefits, including education and protecting the Taino from the savage and cannibalistic Carib Indians. The Taino still owned the land as new Castilians. “Encomienda” can devolve into a system of slavery, since it isn’t market-based. Guess who never used the system – the Italian Columbus. Who did use it? Ovando, a Spanish Governor, the third one after Columbus. Ovando let Columbus stay shipwrecked in Jamaica for a year, likely fearing Columbus would oust him over his abuses of the Taino.
  • The lie: Columbus was a child sex trafficker and rapist.
    The truth: In a letter, Columbus noted that girls as young as nine were being sold. It was a complaint letter. This was after Columbus was ousted by de Bobadilla and he was complaining about how things had deteriorated since his departure.
    More truth: On the second voyage, Michele de Cuneo describes raping an Indian woman after fighting the Carib cannibals. In one part of the letter, he says Columbus “gave her to him.” What is ignored? The letter first says he took her, not that Columbus gave her to him. Is it real? No one else recorded this encounter nor anything like it. de Cuneo seems to be engaged in braggadocio of his own sexual prowess like a disturbed letter to Penthouse. Now, look at the surrounding facts. None of Columbus’ detractors who worked against him (there were several) ever accused him of rape or sex trafficking. As they were trying to oust him, wouldn’t they have if he were doing so? Even Rodan, who started a rebellion against Columbus did not. In fact, his complaint was the opposite. He complained Columbus would not let the Spaniards have native women and he made them take the monastic vow of chastity.
  • The lie: When Columbus first saw the natives, he wanted to enslave them and said that he could with only 50 men.
    The truth: Columbus did not want to and had no intention of doing so. On the day he landed he was giving a report to the Crown about what conditions were there, including a security report. This was an observation, not an aspiration.
  • The lie: A contemporary of Columbus, Bartolome de las Cases, wrote about Columbus’ atrocities toward native people.
    The truth: De Las Cases was 8 when Columbus sailed the ocean blue, and he wasn’t on the ship. de Las Cases didn’t come to the New World until he was a teenager, six years after Columbus was Governor, so he never witnessed a day of Columbus’ short rule. de Las Cases spent the first part of his life going on slave raids against the Taino after Columbus was dead. Later he decided that was wrong and advocated replacing all the Indian slaves, with Black slaves from Africa. Still later in life, he decided that was wrong too. In an attempt to steer criticism from his own atrocities, he began writing about Columbus — 36 years after Columbus died. This is not a “contemporary” account of Columbus. It’s not an eyewitness report. de las Cases’ own contemporaries called him paranoid and mentally ill.
  • The lie: Columbus is responsible for genocide.
    The truth: Large-scale deaths can be attributed to disease. Columbus couldn’t stop it because he didn’t know what a germ was. Germs weren’t known in Europe until Italian physician Girolamo Fracastoro proposed them, 40 years after Columbus died. Whoever came first was going to spread disease, and that’s not a genocide, which requires political intention.
  • The lie: Columbus didn’t “discover” America because the natives were here.
    The truth: I shudder at having to explain. Doesn’t NASA “discover” new planets? Don’t we say Fleming “discovered” penicillin and Madam Curie “discovered” radium? Don’t firemen “discover” a body in the rubble, or police “discover” one at a crime scene? Those people, planets, and elements existed before those “discoveries” but we still use the word, because the word does not connote creation – it connotes the actor finding something he or she had not known before. Columbus did discover the Americas for the Europeans, which led eventually to the USA.

To summarize, Columbus the Italian is often blamed for what later Spanish governors did to the Taino. He couldn’t control, nor is he responsible for what the Spanish government did after he died. That would be like blaming Barack Obama for anything one doesn’t like about Donald Trump, simply because Obama came first. Silly, right? Obama didn’t “enable” or “lead to” Trump because he came first. He simply came first. George H.W. Bush isn’t responsible for what Bill Clinton later did in the oval office to an intern, is he? Columbus is not responsible for what Spanish governors did later, either. Columbus was a good Italian Catholic and we celebrate him.

  • Another whopping lie often told at these events is not about Columbus, but America herself. They claim America is involved in a current genocide of Native Americans.
    The Truth: Let’s put aside that Native American numbers are growing. As hyperbolic and obviously false that claim is, I decided to at least research it. There are organizations and media that track current genocides and potential genocides around the world. None of them listed America. In fact, no genocide was listed in the entire Western Hemisphere.

I support Indigenous People’s Day celebrations and would attend and donate to them (I have). Hispanic countries seem to be handling them and Columbus Day particularly well. They either combine them or separate them instead of destroying one or the other. Argentina’s is a “Day of Respect of Cultural Diversity.” Colombia celebrates “the encounter of two worlds.” Peru celebrates “Intercultural Dialogue Day.” Costa Rica celebrates “A Day of Encounter of Cultures.”

See the pattern? They strive for inclusion of all. I like that. No one is canceled. If we are really going to move Indigenous People’s Day from August 9 to October, I suggest a full weekend — Indigenous People’s Day beginning on Friday and Columbus Day on Monday. Everyone wins.

In the meantime, if you oppose Columbus Day, make sure you go to work on Monday.

Arrivederci.

Published in Culture
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  1. Goldgeller Member
    Goldgeller
    @Goldgeller

    This was a great post and I learned a lot. One interesting point you bring up is that a lot of views about C. Columbus are really, to some extent,  proxy arguments for views generally about colonialism and how we should think about the conquered and the conquerers. The arguments and views about Columbus aren’t really about him. He didn’t originate the idea of nations growing their territories.  I also enjoyed the rebuttals of “here is why Columbus is particularly bad” arguments. I don’t dabble in this area but it seems the specific charges against Columbus always keep growing so it is hard to keep a list of what people claim he did and didn’t do. So you brought up some new ones (to me) and explained the context, which was helpful. 

    I don’t even have very strong feelings about Columbus Day, I just think that most of the [counter] narrative about Columbus being particularly bad is probably stretched and I don’t like that.

    • #1
  2. Basil Fawlty Member
    Basil Fawlty
    @BasilFawlty

    A blast from the past!

    • #2
  3. Gossamer Cat Coolidge
    Gossamer Cat
    @GossamerCat

    Excellent observations and defense of Christopher Columbus.  

    Tommy De Seno: Indigenous People’s Day was created by the UN and has been celebrated on August 9 for decades. November is Native American Heritage Month. This push by political confrontationists to move it to Columbus Day serves no purpose other than to pit Indigenous People against Italian Catholics in a fight neither of them asked to have.

    Italics and bolding mine.  You are 100% correct about this.  There is no reason to conflate the two other than to pick a fight.  I won’t dismiss Indigenous People’s Day outright but I won’t acknowledge it on Columbus Day.  Of course, the moron in the White House did just that.  

    Those of us of Italian descent know the history of Italians in this country and if any group has reasons to be aggrieved, it is us.  But the thing that makes me most proud of being Italian is that we are not aggrieved.  Our family very much appreciates the opportunities afforded by this country and we were taught to love and respect it, even as Italian immigrants struggled with prejudice and violence against them.  

    • #3
  4. Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Democracy) Thatcher
    Gumby Mark (R-Meth Lab of Democracy)
    @GumbyMark

    Good post and good to see you back.

    • #4
  5. Seawriter Contributor
    Seawriter
    @Seawriter

    One of the things I have noticed about using my phone to view Ricochet is that sometimes I inadvertently end up copying and republishing an entire post while trying to read it. That is what happened with the original comment. That’s why I deleted the comment and replaced it with this.

    • #5
  6. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    What a wonderfully informative post!  I too, have long wondered why the Spanish have never been criticized in America for their role in conquering the South American Indians.  Instead, they excoriate the “White Man” for our supposed awful treatment of North American Indians, while giving a complete pass tho the Spaniards whose actual goal was bloody conquest and thievery.

    In the world of the left, there is total inconsistency when it comes to applying standards.  Just as the state of Israel is universally condemned for human rights abuses, despite sharing and acting on pretty much the same values as those on the left, but Muslim cultures that degrade women and kill homosexuals are purposely overlooked.

    • #6
  7. Henry Racette Contributor
    Henry Racette
    @HenryRacette

    Thank you for a terrific post. I’ve always been in favor of keeping Columbus Day Columbus Day, and will continue to do so, but I never suspected the vilification of the man was so mistaken. History is one of my numerous weak spots, and you’ve prompted me to do a little digging. 

    • #7
  8. OldPhil Coolidge
    OldPhil
    @OldPhil

    Celebrating “Indigenous People’s Day” serves no purpose, because what is the purpose of celebrating an amorphous mass of “people?” We should absolutely continue to celebrate individual accomplishments, like Columbus’, like George Washington’s (oops, Presidents’!), like Martin Luther King’s, like all of those who actually merit celebration because they accomplished something and moved humanity forward.

    By celebrating “Indigenous People”, are we celebrating the Aztecs’ mass murder, slavery, and human sacrifice? Are we celebrating Native Americans (excuse me, Asians who came over the Siberian land bridge a zillion years ago) who killed, kidnapped, and enslaved others similar to them? Are we celebrating black African tribesmen who captured and sold their continent-mates to European slavers? 

    Indigenous people are no more deserving of a day than any other “people.”

     

    • #8
  9. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    OldPhil (View Comment):

    Celebrating “Indigenous People’s Day” serves no purpose, because what is the purpose of celebrating an amorphous mass of “people?” We should absolutely continue to celebrate individual accomplishments, like Columbus’, like George Washington’s (oops, Presidents’!), like Martin Luther King’s, like all of those who actually merit celebration because they accomplished something and moved humanity forward.

    By celebrating “Indigenous People”, are we celebrating the Aztecs’ mass murder, slavery, and human sacrifice? Are we celebrating Native Americans (excuse me, Asians who came over the Siberian land bridge a zillion years ago) who killed, kidnapped, and enslaved others similar to them? Are we celebrating black African tribesmen who captured and sold their continent-mates to European slavers?

    Indigenous people are no more deserving of a day than any other “people.”

    I  think it might make more sense to have an “Invading People’s Day”  or a “Raiding People’s Day.”  You would  probably  encompass far more people world-wide, and at the same time, a lot of the Native Americans, for there are probably more cultures that have been invaders at some point in their history than not.

     

    • #9
  10. Manny Member
    Manny
    @Manny

    Thank you, thank you, thank you.  A thousand likes for putting out the truth about Christopher Columbus.  This will be the first year in New York City – probably the city in the country with the most Italian-American population – no longer celebrates Columbus Day.  The expletive Mayor de Blasio got the day changed to Indigenous People’s Day.  Such acts across the country are all based on misinformation and hatred – yes racist hatred – of white Europeans by a left wing crowd that is trying to alter the understanding of our very history.  It’s they who are racist.

    • #10
  11. James Salerno Coolidge
    James Salerno
    @JamesSalerno

    OldPhil (View Comment):

    Celebrating “Indigenous People’s Day” serves no purpose, because what is the purpose of celebrating an amorphous mass of “people?” We should absolutely continue to celebrate individual accomplishments, like Columbus’, like George Washington’s (oops, Presidents’!), like Martin Luther King’s, like all of those who actually merit celebration because they accomplished something and moved humanity forward.

    By celebrating “Indigenous People”, are we celebrating the Aztecs’ mass murder, slavery, and human sacrifice? Are we celebrating Native Americans (excuse me, Asians who came over the Siberian land bridge a zillion years ago) who killed, kidnapped, and enslaved others similar to them? Are we celebrating black African tribesmen who captured and sold their continent-mates to European slavers?

    Indigenous people are no more deserving of a day than any other “people.”

    Why do we need to have an Indigenous People’s Day at all? To me, that always felt like a pity gift. What did indigenous people contribute culturally to American/Western civilization that warrants a holiday?

    • #11
  12. DonG (CAGW is a hoax) Coolidge
    DonG (CAGW is a hoax)
    @DonG

    I’ll be contrary.  I don’t think Columbus did anything that special.  I certainly don’t think any non-American deserves an American holiday.  Actually,  I don’t think any specific person deserves a national holiday.  Holidays are for ideas only. I would rename MLK day to “Freedom Martyrs Day”.   Columbus day is niche cultural celebration day like St. Patrick’s Day and Mardi Gras and Halloween.

    As for “indigenous peoples”, humans are not indigenous to the Western Hemisphere.  Perhaps we should call them the “first conquerors”, but we don’t have records about which conquerors were first, so let’s celebrate *all* conquerors:)

    • #12
  13. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    James Salerno (View Comment):

     

    Why do we need to have an Indigenous People’s Day at all? To me, that always felt like a pity gift. What did indigenous people contribute culturally to American/Western civilization that warrants a holiday?

    They gave us the Cleveland Indians,wooden indians, indian clubs, and the buffalo nickel.  And I almost forgot, Indian Summers.

    • #13
  14. Seawriter Contributor
    Seawriter
    @Seawriter

    Steven Seward (View Comment):
    They gave us the Cleveland Indians,wooden indians, indian clubs, and the buffalo nickel.  And I almost forgot, Indian Summers.

    Is enjoying an Indian Summer cultural appropriation?

    • #14
  15. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    Seawriter (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):
    They gave us the Cleveland Indians,wooden indians, indian clubs, and the buffalo nickel. And I almost forgot, Indian Summers.

    Is enjoying an Indian Summer cultural appropriation?

    You bet!

    • #15
  16. James Salerno Coolidge
    James Salerno
    @JamesSalerno

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    James Salerno (View Comment):

     

    Why do we need to have an Indigenous People’s Day at all? To me, that always felt like a pity gift. What did indigenous people contribute culturally to American/Western civilization that warrants a holiday?

    They gave us the Cleveland Indians,wooden indians, indian clubs, and the buffalo nickel. And I almost forgot, Indian Summers.

    They also gave us the inspiration for Land O’Lakes butter and the Washington Redskins, but we took those away from them, like Indian givers. Everything comes full circle.

    • #16
  17. Manny Member
    Manny
    @Manny

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    James Salerno (View Comment):

     

    Why do we need to have an Indigenous People’s Day at all? To me, that always felt like a pity gift. What did indigenous people contribute culturally to American/Western civilization that warrants a holiday?

    They gave us the Cleveland Indians,wooden indians, indian clubs, and the buffalo nickel. And I almost forgot, Indian Summers.

    Um, FIFY, now the Cleveland Guardians, starting in 2022 spring training.  

    • #17
  18. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    James Salerno (View Comment):

     

    Why do we need to have an Indigenous People’s Day at all? To me, that always felt like a pity gift. What did indigenous people contribute culturally to American/Western civilization that warrants a holiday?

    They gave us the Cleveland Indians,wooden indians, indian clubs, and the buffalo nickel. And I almost forgot, Indian Summers.

    They also gave us the inspiration for Land O’Lakes butter and the Washington Redskins, but we took those away from them, like Indian givers. Everything comes full circle.

    My wife and I actually stopped buying Land O’ Lakes butter when they took  away the lovely Indian lady.  We don’t want to contribute to this nuttiness.  The packaging now looks pointless with the empty horizon.  Maybe they’ll eventually put a white person in there.

    • #18
  19. Steven Seward Member
    Steven Seward
    @StevenSeward

    Manny (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    Why do we need to have an Indigenous People’s Day at all? To me, that always felt like a pity gift. What did indigenous people contribute culturally to American/Western civilization that warrants a holiday?

    They gave us the Cleveland Indians,wooden indians, indian clubs, and the buffalo nickel. And I almost forgot, Indian Summers.

    Um, FIFY, now the Cleveland Guardians, starting in 2022 spring training.

    Eventually, they will find a way to portray “Guardians” as either racist or white supremacist.  Remember, our prisons employ Guardians, our military has many Guardians, and other Guardians protect their homes and businesses with guns and rifles.

    In the end, we will have to come up with yet another  new name.

    • #19
  20. James Salerno Coolidge
    James Salerno
    @JamesSalerno

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    Why do we need to have an Indigenous People’s Day at all? To me, that always felt like a pity gift. What did indigenous people contribute culturally to American/Western civilization that warrants a holiday?

    They gave us the Cleveland Indians,wooden indians, indian clubs, and the buffalo nickel. And I almost forgot, Indian Summers.

    Um, FIFY, now the Cleveland Guardians, starting in 2022 spring training.

    Eventually, they will find a way to portray “Guardians” as either racist or white supremacist. Remember, our prisons employ Guardians, our military has many Guardians, and other Guardians protect their homes and businesses with guns and rifles.

    In the end, we will have to come up with yet another new name.

    Don’t forget the Guardian Angels, who were essentially an arm of law enforcement, and thus were likely hunting down black people for sport in their spare time.

    • #20
  21. Joseph Stanko Coolidge
    Joseph Stanko
    @JosephStanko

    Tommy De Seno:

    It’s also understandable that the Indigenous People in Hispanic countries might not celebrate that — they were conquered.

    Even that is oversimplified.  How were so few Spaniards able to conquer the mighty Aztec empire?  By organizing and leading a rebellion of tribes that had been conquered and oppressed by the Aztecs.  

    Perhaps they merely traded one oppressor for another.  True, the Spanish enslaved and mistreated them, but at least they didn’t rip out their beating hearts in ritual human sacrifice.  The idea that indigenous people were all free and happy noble savages until the evil colonizing Europeans arrived is total baloney.

     

    • #21
  22. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    My mother-in-law was Italian. I love the Italian side of my husband’s family. They are warmest people I’ve ever known–and the best cooks. I learned so much from them. 

    This was a great post, some of which I remember hearing from my mother-in-law and her family. 

    The only thing I can say about the persecution of Italians in this country is that there are truly evil people in the world. They just keep picking new targets. 

    • #22
  23. Podkayne of Israel Member
    Podkayne of Israel
    @PodkayneofIsrael

    ” But the thing that makes me most proud of being Italian is that we are not aggrieved.”

    Nor are the Irish. And both these groups suffered mightily from prejudice and discrimination in their time. 

    What would America be without the rich contributions of these and other ethnic groups? Poorer in so many ways.

    • #23
  24. Manny Member
    Manny
    @Manny

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    Manny (View Comment):

    Steven Seward (View Comment):

    James Salerno (View Comment):

    Why do we need to have an Indigenous People’s Day at all? To me, that always felt like a pity gift. What did indigenous people contribute culturally to American/Western civilization that warrants a holiday?

    They gave us the Cleveland Indians,wooden indians, indian clubs, and the buffalo nickel. And I almost forgot, Indian Summers.

    Um, FIFY, now the Cleveland Guardians, starting in 2022 spring training.

    Eventually, they will find a way to portray “Guardians” as either racist or white supremacist. Remember, our prisons employ Guardians, our military has many Guardians, and other Guardians protect their homes and businesses with guns and rifles.

    In the end, we will have to come up with yet another new name.

    Guardians as white supremacist! LOL. That might fit in a way. Actually it sounds patriarchal. We might want to get that rumor going to undermine the change.

    • #24
  25. Stad Coolidge
    Stad
    @Stad

    Tommy De Seno: There’s a right way to do an Indigenous People’s Day and a wrong way.

    The wrong way is to have it the same day as Columbus Day.

    • #25
  26. dukenaltum Coolidge
    dukenaltum
    @dukenaltum

    Columbus was a brilliant, great and good man and deserves two holidays: Columbus Day and Christian Civilization Appreciation Day.  

    • #26
  27. Podkayne of Israel Member
    Podkayne of Israel
    @PodkayneofIsrael

     

     

    Guardians as white supremacist! LOL. That might fit in a way. Actually it sounds patriarchal. We might want to get that rumor going to undermine the change.

    Only if those Guardians “Take up the white man’s burden”.

    • #27