Research suggests that childhood poverty impedes children’s healthy growth and success in adulthood. In 2015, Congress asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to conduct a study of child poverty in the US and identify evidence-based policies to reduce it. The recently released report, “A Roadmap to Reducing Child Poverty,” describes two packages of federal policies that would cut US child poverty by half within a decade.

But what would it take to turn report proposals into congressional authorization for new federal spending? Do key stakeholders agree that reducing child poverty is a priority for federal policy? And if authorized, how much would new federal spending really help poor children?

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Europe’s political landscape is becoming much more challenging, as evidenced by the strong showing of populist parties in the recent European parliamentary elections and by the deepening Brexit crisis. The question remains: how serious are these challenges are to the European economic outlook? What economic policies can meet these challenges?

MORE RESOURCES:
Italy (Lorenzo Forni)
Economic Policies after the European parliamentary elections (Vitor Gaspar)
Economic challanges (Desmond Lachman)

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Both political parties frequently argue that the American dream is in peril. They say hard work does not pay off, wages have been stagnant for decades, the middle class is shrinking, the US is no longer upwardly mobile. In their minds, the game is rigged, but not by them. Instead, populist frustration says some “other” — the elites, the rich, immigrants, or China — is to blame for today’s economic outcomes.

In “The American Dream Is Not Dead: (But Populism Could Kill It)” (Templeton Press, 2020), AEI’s Michael R. Strain argues against this assessment. He uses persuasive, under-reported evidence to prove that the American dream is alive and well.

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President Trump has drastically shaken up America’s foreign policy establishment, from how the US treats its allies to its approach toward sovereignty and global institutions. The Taliban peace deal to withdraw US forces while releasing thousands of Taliban prisoners is just one example. But where does Trump’s foreign policy fit into American history and, in particular, the conservative tradition?

In “Age of Iron: On Conservative Nationalism” (Oxford University Press, 2019), Colin Dueck tells the story of Republican foreign policy since the 20th century. He describes the shifting coalitions and priorities that have shaped policy, arguing that conservative nationalism is actually the oldest democratic tradition in US foreign relations.

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While there is no shortage of discussion about how war between the US and China could break out, few have asked how such a war might end. During crisis or conflict, how can we draw China to the negotiating table? How has China historically ended its wars, and how might this inform how the US approaches China diplomatically in peacetime, crisis, and war?

In her new book, “The Costs of Conversation: Obstacles to Peace Talks in Wartime” (Cornell University Press, 2019), Oriana Skylar Mastro asks: How can we get from fighting to talking? Join Dr. Mastro, Susan Thornton, and Tom Christensen as they discuss US diplomacy with China in an era of great-power competition.

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In recent months, protests rocked the Middle East. Prime ministers have resigned in Iraq and Lebanon. Hundreds of protesters were gunned down in Iran. Libya continues to boil.

For decades, US foreign policy in the region has been on autopilot: seek Arab-Israeli peace, fight terrorism, and futilely urge regimes to respect human rights. Every US administration puts its own spin on these initiatives, but none has successfully resolved the region’s fundamental problems.

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As the Coronavirus spreads through East Asia and dominates news cycles, we reflect on the lessons learned from the world’s last major outbreak: Ebola. Listen to this audio from AEI’s June 26, 2019 event with discussing the threat and methods of containment and treatment.

Since last August, history’s second-deadliest Ebola outbreak has left over 1,400 dead in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The outbreak is in conflict-plagued eastern DRC, where frequent militia attacks and human displacement have frustrated efforts to contain it. The rate of infection is accelerating, and the epidemic threatens to spill into neighboring countries. Governments, health officials, and international organizations face tremendous obstacles in containing the disease.

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Under Xi Jinping, the People’s Republic of China has married global ambitions to pervasive social control. Through surveillance and suppression, military modernization, and predatory industrial policy, Xi and the Chinese Communist Party seek to cement totalitarian rule in China, gain hegemony in the Indo-Pacific, and ensure China becomes the dominant global player. As such, China challenges America’s regional interests, pressures Taiwan and other regional allies, and threatens Hong Kong, ethnic Uighurs, and millions more.

What are leaders in Congress doing to counter China? What are the elements of a legislative response, including in foreign policy, national security, development, and human rights reforms?

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The Department of Veterans’ Affairs should be the nation’s greatest champion for veteran care, service, and support… yet often it struggles to provide veterans with the resources needed for success.

Join US House VA Committee members Mike Levin (D-CA) and Brad Wenstrup (R-OH) as they discuss the VET OPP Act, their joint attempt to better equip veterans for civilian sector success

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The Department of Veterans’ Affairs should be the nation’s greatest champion for veteran care, service, and support… yet often it struggles to provide veterans with the resources needed for success.

Join US House VA Committee members Mike Levin (D-CA) and Brad Wenstrup (R-OH) as they discuss the VET OPP Act, their joint attempt to better equip veterans for civilian sector success

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The Department of Veterans’ Affairs should be the nation’s greatest champion for veteran care, service, and support… yet often it struggles to provide veterans with the resources needed for success.

Join US House VA Committee members Mike Levin (D-CA) and Brad Wenstrup (R-OH) as they discuss the VET OPP Act, their joint attempt to better equip veterans for civilian sector success

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The American safety net is made up of more than 80 individual programs that spend roughly $1 trillion annually. This system has done a remarkable job in terms of alleviating material hardship but has been less successful at promoting upward mobility and empowering welfare recipients to rise out of poverty.

Clarence H. Carter, the Director of the Office of Family Assistance and Acting Director of the Office of Community Services at the Department of Health and Human Services, shares his vision for a re-imagined safety net with AEI’s Matt Weidinger. They discuss how programs can grow the capacity of recipients while also leveraging the expertise and creativity of local communities and service providers.

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The American safety net is made up of more than 80 individual programs that spend roughly $1 trillion annually. This system has done a remarkable job in terms of alleviating material hardship but has been less successful at promoting upward mobility and empowering welfare recipients to rise out of poverty.

Clarence H. Carter, the Director of the Office of Family Assistance and Acting Director of the Office of Community Services at the Department of Health and Human Services, shares his vision for a re-imagined safety net with AEI’s Matt Weidinger. They discuss how programs can grow the capacity of recipients while also leveraging the expertise and creativity of local communities and service providers.

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What is American conservatism? Does the conservatism of today uphold the philosophies of the American founding?
Join AEI President Robert Doar and columnist George Will as they discuss Dr. Will’s newest book, The Conservative Sensibility.

 

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What has happened to millennials over the past decade, and who is responsible?

Millennials complain that the job market has never fully worked for them, that they are crushed by student debt, and that paying for their parents’ old-age entitlement benefits will bankrupt them. But are these complaints justified? Joseph Sternberg of The Wall Street Journal joins AEI’s Ramesh Ponnuru and The Century Foundation’s Conor Williams to discuss if the policy choices of baby boomers have created a real problem for millennials entering the job market today.

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One year has passed since the passage of the Family First Prevention Services Act. This bipartisan legislation offered states the option to apply Title IV-E foster care funds toward preventive services intended to keep children in homes with their families. The legislation also placed a cap on the amount of federal funds that could be used to fund residential institutions for kids in foster care.

Congressional leaders have sent a letter to Health and Human Services voicing concerns over missed deadlines and the pace at which preventive service programs are approved for reimbursement. Meanwhile, state leaders are struggling to find alternatives to residential foster institutions, which could mean leaving children in unsafe homes.

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In today’s challenging political environment, there is much we can still learn from the life of Nelson Mandela, South Africa’s legendary leader.

Ndaba Mandela shares the leadership principles that he learned from his grandfather, and his efforts in fostering youth leaders who can identify and help resolve problems facing their communities. He will also discuss #100Mandelas, the flagship project of Africa Rising, which will be partnering with the US Dream Academy to create global youth leaders in the United States and South Africa dedicated to breaking cycles of poverty and incarceration.

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Is the Trump phenomenon a mere aberration, or is it indicative of a long-term trend unlikely to disappear anytime soon? What are the various forms of nationalism surfacing in the US, and more broadly, how do they influence conservative policy?

The resurgence of American nationalism has the potential to transform domestic and foreign policy alike, affecting everything from border security to free trade to alliance management. Join AEI’s Colin Dueck, John Yoo, Henry Olsen, Matt Spalding, and Jonah Goldberg as they discuss what American nationalism is, how it relates to the Trump presidency, and what its policy implications are.

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For decades, the US-Colombia relationship has facilitated vital cooperation on security, trade, and a host of regional issues. Under President Iván Duque Márquez and Vice President Marta Lucía Ramírez, Colombia is working with the US to confront the hostile Venezuelan regime and combat the resurgence of coca cultivation and transnational organized crime.

AEI’s Roger Noriega and Colombian Vice President Marta Lucía Ramírez discuss what the future may hold for the US-Colombia relationship, the Venezuelan crisis, and transnational organized crime.

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Should the Fed be allowed to discriminate to prevent entry and innovation?

When the Fed undertook a series of quantitative easing operations to control interest rates and lift the economy out of the Great Recession, it began paying banks interest on bank reserves. As the Fed raised the interest rate paid on reserves, new specialized banks formed to capture that interest. The Fed has resisted opening accounts for these new banks, triggering legal action.

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