Following his convincing electoral victory, Boris Johnson still faces two daunting challenges. The first is to negotiate a permanent economic relationship with the European Union by the end of 2020. The second is to maintain the integrity of the United Kingdom following the Scottish National Party’s strong showing in the election.

Our panel of experts, to include the EU and Irish Ambassadors to the United States, discusses Johnson’s likely success in meeting those two challenges and the economic and political implications of Brexit for the UK and Europe.

More

COVID-19 has devastated the US economy, disrupted the nation’s food supply chains, significantly affected federal and state safety-net programs for low-income households, and catastrophically damaged the financial well-being of tens of millions of families. These impacts are disproportionately disrupting the lives and incomes of the most vulnerable populations — perhaps especially children, single-parent households, the elderly, and the homeless — leading to increasingly widespread concerns about rising food insecurity, hunger, and malnutrition for those populations.

Diane Schanzenbach, Scott Winship, Angela Rachidi, and Joseph Glauber join Vincent Smith, director of agricultural studies at AEI, to discuss the food supply and food insecurity issues created by COVID-19 and current and potential policy responses to address the critically important challenges that the nation faces.

More

North Korea is the world’s most repressive state — and the Organization and Guidance Department (OGD) is the key apparatus in Pyongyang’s administration of tyranny. The OGD may be little known in the United States, but, according to North Korean defector Jang Jin-sung, it is “the only entity that actually matters when it comes to decision-making or policy-making” in the Kim family regime. But what exactly is the OGD, how does it operate, and why do North Korea watchers, American policymakers, and human rights activists need to know about it?

Robert M. Collins lifts the veil on this ominous apparatus in the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea’s new report “Organization and Guidance Department: Control Tower of Human Rights Denial”. Enjoy this panel discussion with Nicholas Eberstadt on the report and the latest research about the OGD.

More

Three days before the South Carolina Democratic primary, AEI’s election experts convened for the first Election Watch event of the 2020 campaign.

With interest in the 2020 elections at record levels, AEI’s Election Watch team returns to help you navigate 2020’s important contests. The panel of experienced analysts will discuss fundamentals including the calendar, the contestants, and the contours of the 2020 electorate. They will examine what has happened thus far in the race and what it means for the next contests, including South Carolina on February 29 and Super Tuesday on March 3. In addition, they will take an early look at the 2020 Senate and gubernatorial races and discuss the strength of the political parties.

More

More than 20,000 youth age out of the foster care system every year. Independent research and government statistics reveal stark outcomes for these young adults, including disproportionately high rates of incarceration. Some experts now claim there exists a “foster care-to-prison pipeline,” calling into question the efficacy of removing children from their homes and decrying the lack of supports offered to transitioning foster youth.

Foster youth face serious trauma, but there is nothing inevitable about their trajectories. Indeed, the interactions between child welfare and law enforcement agencies may be creating more problems than they are solving. Please join AEI’s Naomi Schaefer Riley as she leads a distinguished panel of experts on the challenges facing former and current foster youth and their intersection with the criminal justice system.

More

In his new book, “Trade Is Not a Four Letter Word: How Six Everyday Products Make the Case for Trade” (Avid Reader Press, 2020), Fred P. Hochberg, chairman and president of the Export-Import Bank of the United States from 2009 to 2017, presents an enjoyable and insightful defense of free trade. Drawing on the history of American trade policy and the contemporary reality of intertwined supply chains and taco salads, he explains why and how the current populist turn toward protectionism threatens the welfare of consumers, workers, and entrepreneurs and undermines US foreign policy goals.

Join AEI’s conversation about Mr. Hochberg’s new book and the politics, economics, and everyday glory of international trade.

More

Americans are living through a social crisis. In our politics, it expresses itself in polarization and division. In our culture, it looks like alienation, anger, and despair.

While social analysts blame factors such as rising inequality or liberalism’s collapse, these explanations are incomplete. The missing ingredient, argues AEI’s Yuval Levin, is the dissolution of our institutions and a transformation of what we expect of them. In “A Time to Build: From Family and Community to Congress and the Campus, How Recommitting to Our Institutions Can Revive the American Dream” (Basic Books, 2020), Dr. Levin explains how institutions have devolved from molds to platforms, fueling cynicism and resentment that leads citizens to rally around firebrands who promise to further shatter these systems.

More

Research suggests that childhood poverty impedes children’s healthy growth and success in adulthood. In 2015, Congress asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to conduct a study of child poverty in the US and identify evidence-based policies to reduce it. The recently released report, “A Roadmap to Reducing Child Poverty,” describes two packages of federal policies that would cut US child poverty by half within a decade.

But what would it take to turn report proposals into congressional authorization for new federal spending? Do key stakeholders agree that reducing child poverty is a priority for federal policy? And if authorized, how much would new federal spending really help poor children?

More

Europe’s political landscape is becoming much more challenging, as evidenced by the strong showing of populist parties in the recent European parliamentary elections and by the deepening Brexit crisis. The question remains: how serious are these challenges are to the European economic outlook? What economic policies can meet these challenges?

MORE RESOURCES:
Italy (Lorenzo Forni)
Economic Policies after the European parliamentary elections (Vitor Gaspar)
Economic challanges (Desmond Lachman)

More

Both political parties frequently argue that the American dream is in peril. They say hard work does not pay off, wages have been stagnant for decades, the middle class is shrinking, the US is no longer upwardly mobile. In their minds, the game is rigged, but not by them. Instead, populist frustration says some “other” — the elites, the rich, immigrants, or China — is to blame for today’s economic outcomes.

In “The American Dream Is Not Dead: (But Populism Could Kill It)” (Templeton Press, 2020), AEI’s Michael R. Strain argues against this assessment. He uses persuasive, under-reported evidence to prove that the American dream is alive and well.

More

President Trump has drastically shaken up America’s foreign policy establishment, from how the US treats its allies to its approach toward sovereignty and global institutions. The Taliban peace deal to withdraw US forces while releasing thousands of Taliban prisoners is just one example. But where does Trump’s foreign policy fit into American history and, in particular, the conservative tradition?

In “Age of Iron: On Conservative Nationalism” (Oxford University Press, 2019), Colin Dueck tells the story of Republican foreign policy since the 20th century. He describes the shifting coalitions and priorities that have shaped policy, arguing that conservative nationalism is actually the oldest democratic tradition in US foreign relations.

More

While there is no shortage of discussion about how war between the US and China could break out, few have asked how such a war might end. During crisis or conflict, how can we draw China to the negotiating table? How has China historically ended its wars, and how might this inform how the US approaches China diplomatically in peacetime, crisis, and war?

In her new book, “The Costs of Conversation: Obstacles to Peace Talks in Wartime” (Cornell University Press, 2019), Oriana Skylar Mastro asks: How can we get from fighting to talking? Join Dr. Mastro, Susan Thornton, and Tom Christensen as they discuss US diplomacy with China in an era of great-power competition.

More

In recent months, protests rocked the Middle East. Prime ministers have resigned in Iraq and Lebanon. Hundreds of protesters were gunned down in Iran. Libya continues to boil.

For decades, US foreign policy in the region has been on autopilot: seek Arab-Israeli peace, fight terrorism, and futilely urge regimes to respect human rights. Every US administration puts its own spin on these initiatives, but none has successfully resolved the region’s fundamental problems.

More

As the Coronavirus spreads through East Asia and dominates news cycles, we reflect on the lessons learned from the world’s last major outbreak: Ebola. Listen to this audio from AEI’s June 26, 2019 event with discussing the threat and methods of containment and treatment.

Since last August, history’s second-deadliest Ebola outbreak has left over 1,400 dead in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The outbreak is in conflict-plagued eastern DRC, where frequent militia attacks and human displacement have frustrated efforts to contain it. The rate of infection is accelerating, and the epidemic threatens to spill into neighboring countries. Governments, health officials, and international organizations face tremendous obstacles in containing the disease.

More

Under Xi Jinping, the People’s Republic of China has married global ambitions to pervasive social control. Through surveillance and suppression, military modernization, and predatory industrial policy, Xi and the Chinese Communist Party seek to cement totalitarian rule in China, gain hegemony in the Indo-Pacific, and ensure China becomes the dominant global player. As such, China challenges America’s regional interests, pressures Taiwan and other regional allies, and threatens Hong Kong, ethnic Uighurs, and millions more.

What are leaders in Congress doing to counter China? What are the elements of a legislative response, including in foreign policy, national security, development, and human rights reforms?

More

The Department of Veterans’ Affairs should be the nation’s greatest champion for veteran care, service, and support… yet often it struggles to provide veterans with the resources needed for success.

Join US House VA Committee members Mike Levin (D-CA) and Brad Wenstrup (R-OH) as they discuss the VET OPP Act, their joint attempt to better equip veterans for civilian sector success

More

The Department of Veterans’ Affairs should be the nation’s greatest champion for veteran care, service, and support… yet often it struggles to provide veterans with the resources needed for success.

Join US House VA Committee members Mike Levin (D-CA) and Brad Wenstrup (R-OH) as they discuss the VET OPP Act, their joint attempt to better equip veterans for civilian sector success

More

The Department of Veterans’ Affairs should be the nation’s greatest champion for veteran care, service, and support… yet often it struggles to provide veterans with the resources needed for success.

Join US House VA Committee members Mike Levin (D-CA) and Brad Wenstrup (R-OH) as they discuss the VET OPP Act, their joint attempt to better equip veterans for civilian sector success

More

The American safety net is made up of more than 80 individual programs that spend roughly $1 trillion annually. This system has done a remarkable job in terms of alleviating material hardship but has been less successful at promoting upward mobility and empowering welfare recipients to rise out of poverty.

Clarence H. Carter, the Director of the Office of Family Assistance and Acting Director of the Office of Community Services at the Department of Health and Human Services, shares his vision for a re-imagined safety net with AEI’s Matt Weidinger. They discuss how programs can grow the capacity of recipients while also leveraging the expertise and creativity of local communities and service providers.

More

The American safety net is made up of more than 80 individual programs that spend roughly $1 trillion annually. This system has done a remarkable job in terms of alleviating material hardship but has been less successful at promoting upward mobility and empowering welfare recipients to rise out of poverty.

Clarence H. Carter, the Director of the Office of Family Assistance and Acting Director of the Office of Community Services at the Department of Health and Human Services, shares his vision for a re-imagined safety net with AEI’s Matt Weidinger. They discuss how programs can grow the capacity of recipients while also leveraging the expertise and creativity of local communities and service providers.

More