Twirling Twirling Into The Future

One caucus down and it appears the whole GOP primary is decided. Thankfully when you get a guest like Henry Olsen (EPPC senior fellow and host of the must-listen Beyond the Polls podcast) everything stays fresh and interesting. Henry has thoughts on what’s left of this Republican primary along with the mess in the D camp; he runs us through campaigns we’re scratching our heads at, forgotten about—or would like to forget about; and he swats away many of the overconfident predictions about how a Trump/Biden rematch will shake out.

James, Rob and Peter applaud Javier Melei and the great free market that wants to spread good news; plus they say their piece about inclement weather and wonder what time it really is in New York.

 

 

 

  • Audio from this week’s open: Trump speaks post-Iowa in New Hampshire; Biden reacts to Trump’s win.

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There are 24 comments.

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  1. James Lileks Contributor
    James Lileks
    @jameslileks

    JEFFREY. I meant JEFFREY Epstein. Jeez.

    Anyway, here are the buildings we were arguing about. Met Life:

     

     

    The lower section on the right was built first, and designed by Napoleon LeBrun, who also designed the tower. He didn’t seem particularly concerned with integrating the two structures. There’s some coherence on the bottom floors, but they part ways until the balconies on the tower tie in to the line of the old building’s cornice. 

    It’s a beaut.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The New York Life.

     

     

    It’s much more earthbound than Cass Gilbert’s other NYC skyscrapers. Compared to Woolworth, it’s a broad, shouldered man sitting on a chair.

    • #1
  2. Mr. Michael Garrett Lincoln
    Mr. Michael Garrett
    @MichaelGarrett

    I am only minutes into listening to this podcast, but that’s not too soon for me to jump in with a comment.

    As a college freshman during the first Reagan term, I decided to start reading the Wall Street Journal editorial page.  One measure of how naive and innocent I was then is how often I would get to the end of a piece and still wonder if I had just finished a facetious work of satire.  

    All right, (as Peter would say, and does), I recall from then that they ran a series of letters contesting the proposition that Don McLean’s “the day the music died” was really November 22, 1963, and not February 3, 1959.

    I look forward to such a very special podcast episode.  And anything to enhance Peter’s familiarity with popular the music of the 20th Century would count as a mitzvah.

    • #2
  3. Internet's Hank Contributor
    Internet's Hank
    @HankRhody

    Making dinner, put the Ricochet podcast on. Assembling Reubens. Desperately waiting for an ad so I can use the electric can opener to get at the sauerkraut, but I can’t miss a minute of this argument over the name of a building in New York.

    • #3
  4. Mr. Michael Garrett Lincoln
    Mr. Michael Garrett
    @MichaelGarrett

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    JEFFREY. I meant JEFFREY Epstein. Jeez.

    Anyway, here are the buildings we were arguing about. Met Life:

     

     

    The lower section on the right was built first, and designed by Napoleon LeBrun, who also designed the tower. He didn’t seem particularly concerned with integrating the two structures. There’s some coherence on the bottom floors, but they part ways until the balconies on the tower tie in to the line of the old building’s cornice.

    It’s a beaut.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The New York Life.

     

     

    It’s much more earthbound than Cass Gilbert’s other NYC skyscrapers. Compared to Woolworth, it’s a broad, shouldered man sitting on a chair.

    The second building, the New York Life tower, sits on the block previously occupied by the old Madison Square Garden, where Harry Thaw murdered Stanford White in 1906, where Jack Dempsey knocked out Bill Brennan in 1920, and where in 1924 the Democrats took 103 ballots to nominate John W. Davis and Charles W. Bryan for president and vice-president.

    • #4
  5. Nanocelt TheContrarian Member
    Nanocelt TheContrarian
    @NanoceltTheContrarian

    What is “inclimate” weather? Is that different from inclement weather?

    • #5
  6. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    • #6
  7. Samuel Block Staff
    Samuel Block
    @SamuelBlock

    Nanocelt TheContrarian (View Comment):

    What is “inclimate” weather? Is that different from inclement weather?

    The difference is that one is a word, the other is my misspelling of it.

    Fixed. Thanks.

    • #7
  8. Samuel Block Staff
    Samuel Block
    @SamuelBlock

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    Making dinner, put the Ricochet podcast on. Assembling Reubens. Desperately waiting for an ad so I can use the electric can opener to get at the sauerkraut, but I can’t miss a minute of this argument over the name of a building in New York.

    If it were anybody else who had written this I’d be absolutely sure that it was sarcasm.

    • #8
  9. Internet's Hank Contributor
    Internet's Hank
    @HankRhody

    Samuel Block (View Comment):

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    Making dinner, put the Ricochet podcast on. Assembling Reubens. Desperately waiting for an ad so I can use the electric can opener to get at the sauerkraut, but I can’t miss a minute of this argument over the name of a building in New York.

    If it were anybody else who had written this I’d be absolutely sure that it was sarcasm.

    The Reubens turned out nicely thank you.

    • #9
  10. Internet's Hank Contributor
    Internet's Hank
    @HankRhody

    Re: Ron DeSantis and strategy, I wonder if he isn’t deliberately avoiding attacking his fellow Republicans as part of some deeper plan. I mean, Reagan laid down his eleventh commandment for a reason. Aside from that, by not insulting his opponents he’s not insulting their backers by proxy. When another candidate drops, his voters might remember attacks from Trump and Haley and decide that DeSantis is an acceptable second choice. 

    Just a couple thoughts.

    • #10
  11. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    It’s actually “Twirling, twirling, twirling towards freedom!”

     

    • #11
  12. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    What James mentioned about the translation program being able to use someone’s actual voice sounds, would approach making the Star Trek “Universal Translator” possible.  Except of course the different languages use words differently, and in a different order…  Even if the own-person’s-sound thing worked, the effect would still be something like some of the past ridiculous dubbed karate/kung-fu movies where you see the person’s mouth start to move and a few seconds later you hear the translated words.

    Although how it would come up with a voice for The Companion remains a mystery.

    • #12
  13. James Lileks Contributor
    James Lileks
    @jameslileks

    kedavis (View Comment):
    Although how it would come up with a voice for The Companion remains a mystery.

    A deleted line from the script suggests that they remodulated the neural inference detector to compensate for photonic interference.

    Kidding; they would never had said anything like that. It would more like Scotty, can you do it? and he’d say if I divert power from the engines, Aye, I might, and that would be it. Spock, if asked, might say something like “attempting to get a fix” while twiddling small tricorder buttons.

    • #13
  14. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    Although how it would come up with a voice for The Companion remains a mystery.

    A deleted line from the script suggests that they remodulated the neural inference detector to compensate for photonic interference.

    Kidding; they would never had said anything like that. It would more like Scotty, can you do it? and he’d say if I divert power from the engines, Aye, I might, and that would be it. Spock, if asked, might say something like “attempting to get a fix” while twiddling small tricorder buttons.

    Well, Spock did say he would need to widen the translator’s field of reception.  Which seemed to involve brushing some kind of “paint” or coating inside it.

    • #14
  15. RufusRJones Member
    RufusRJones
    @RufusRJones

    Gretchen Whitmer and Raphael Warnock in the White House. 

    Plausible candidacy. 

    I’m going to spend the rest of the day vomiting. 

    • #15
  16. Nanocelt TheContrarian Member
    Nanocelt TheContrarian
    @NanoceltTheContrarian

    Samuel Block (View Comment):

    Nanocelt TheContrarian (View Comment):

    What is “inclimate” weather? Is that different from inclement weather?

    The difference is that one is a word, the other is my misspelling of it.

    Fixed. Thanks.

    I thought you were originating something like an Overton Window for Climate change. Sorry. 

    • #16
  17. Cosmik Phred Member
    Cosmik Phred
    @CosmikPhred

    Thanks to @jameslileks and @roblong for sending me down the Louis Sullivan interwebs rabbit hole.  Some of the “Jewel Boxes” look like they’re being crushed and dominated by the upper parts of their structures.  However, once one sees the interiors and the “inside out/form follows function” design philosophy, all is forgiven.

    Fantastic stuff.

    • #17
  18. WilliamWarford Coolidge
    WilliamWarford
    @WilliamWarford

    James Lileks (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):
    Although how it would come up with a voice for The Companion remains a mystery.

    A deleted line from the script suggests that they remodulated the neural inference detector to compensate for photonic interference.

    Kidding; they would never had said anything like that. It would more like Scotty, can you do it? and he’d say if I divert power from the engines, Aye, I might, and that would be it. Spock, if asked, might say something like “attempting to get a fix” while twiddling small tricorder buttons.

    And Dr. McCoy would have said, “It’s dead, Jim.”

    • #18
  19. JuliaBach Coolidge
    JuliaBach
    @JuliaBach

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    Re: Ron DeSantis and strategy, I wonder if he isn’t deliberately avoiding attacking his fellow Republicans as part of some deeper plan. I mean, Reagan laid down his eleventh commandment for a reason. Aside from that, by not insulting his opponents he’s not insulting their backers by proxy. When another candidate drops, his voters might remember attacks from Trump and Haley and decide that DeSantis is an acceptable second choice.

    Just a couple thoughts.

    Agreed.  But where was Mr. Olsen when DeSantis was pointing out 1) he can run for two terms while Trump cannot and 2) nominate him, and the election is about policy and the future, and not Mr. Trump’s legal problems?  DeSantis did plenty to distinguish himself from Trump.  The main problem was that Trump voters were never going to support DeSantis, because they love Trump, not conservative policies.  I was surprised DeSantis got in this time, while Trump was still around.  But maybe he also worries there won’t be a country anymore by 2028.

    • #19
  20. kedavis Coolidge
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    JuliaBach (View Comment):

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    Re: Ron DeSantis and strategy, I wonder if he isn’t deliberately avoiding attacking his fellow Republicans as part of some deeper plan. I mean, Reagan laid down his eleventh commandment for a reason. Aside from that, by not insulting his opponents he’s not insulting their backers by proxy. When another candidate drops, his voters might remember attacks from Trump and Haley and decide that DeSantis is an acceptable second choice.

    Just a couple thoughts.

    Agreed. But where was Mr. Olsen when DeSantis was pointing out 1) he can run for two terms while Trump cannot and 2) nominate him, and the election is about policy and the future, and not Mr. Trump’s legal problems? DeSantis did plenty to distinguish himself from Trump. The main problem was that Trump voters were never going to support DeSantis, because they love Trump, not conservative policies. I was surprised DeSantis got in this time, while Trump was still around. But maybe he also worries there won’t be a country anymore by 2028.

    The short answer could be that DeSantis decided to get in because someone offered to pay for it.

    • #20
  21. JuliaBach Coolidge
    JuliaBach
    @JuliaBach

    kedavis (View Comment):

    JuliaBach (View Comment):

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    Re: Ron DeSantis and strategy, I wonder if he isn’t deliberately avoiding attacking his fellow Republicans as part of some deeper plan. I mean, Reagan laid down his eleventh commandment for a reason. Aside from that, by not insulting his opponents he’s not insulting their backers by proxy. When another candidate drops, his voters might remember attacks from Trump and Haley and decide that DeSantis is an acceptable second choice.

    Just a couple thoughts.

    Agreed. But where was Mr. Olsen when DeSantis was pointing out 1) he can run for two terms while Trump cannot and 2) nominate him, and the election is about policy and the future, and not Mr. Trump’s legal problems? DeSantis did plenty to distinguish himself from Trump. The main problem was that Trump voters were never going to support DeSantis, because they love Trump, not conservative policies. I was surprised DeSantis got in this time, while Trump was still around. But maybe he also worries there won’t be a country anymore by 2028.

    The short answer could be that DeSantis decided to get in because someone offered to pay for it.

    Sure, that probably had something to do with it.  But I think he shares my view that if people aren’t held accountable for COVID policy, we will likely repeat it, and that might be the end of the USA.

    • #21
  22. Samuel Block Staff
    Samuel Block
    @SamuelBlock

    Mr. Michael Garrett (View Comment):

    I am only minutes into listening to this podcast, but that’s not too soon for me to jump in with a comment.

    As a college freshman during the first Reagan term, I decided to start reading the Wall Street Journal editorial page. One measure of how naive and innocent I was then is how often I would get to the end of a piece and still wonder if I had just finished a facetious work of satire.

    All right, (as Peter would say, and does), I recall from then that they ran a series of letters contesting the proposition that Don McLean’s “the day the music died” was really November 22, 1963, and not February 3, 1959.

    I look forward to such a very special podcast episode. And anything to enhance Peter’s familiarity with popular the music of the 20th Century would count as a mitzvah.

    Mr. Garrett,

    I’m pleased to announce that the hosts are game! We’ll have to sort out a few details but keep an eye out for this special episode in the near future.

    (Alas, I’m not sure I’ll be able to convince Peter to try They Might Be Giants.)

    • #22
  23. Bishop Wash Member
    Bishop Wash
    @BishopWash

    Samuel Block (View Comment):

    Mr. Michael Garrett (View Comment):

    I am only minutes into listening to this podcast, but that’s not too soon for me to jump in with a comment.

    As a college freshman during the first Reagan term, I decided to start reading the Wall Street Journal editorial page. One measure of how naive and innocent I was then is how often I would get to the end of a piece and still wonder if I had just finished a facetious work of satire.

    All right, (as Peter would say, and does), I recall from then that they ran a series of letters contesting the proposition that Don McLean’s “the day the music died” was really November 22, 1963, and not February 3, 1959.

    I look forward to such a very special podcast episode. And anything to enhance Peter’s familiarity with popular the music of the 20th Century would count as a mitzvah.

    Mr. Garrett,

    I’m pleased to announce that the hosts are game! We’ll have to sort out a few details but keep an eye out for this special episode in the near future.

    (Alas, I’m not sure I’ll be able to convince Peter to try They Might Be Giants.)

    He might like Istanbul (Not Constantinople) for the lyrics.

    • #23
  24. Bishop Wash Member
    Bishop Wash
    @BishopWash

    JuliaBach (View Comment):

    Internet’s Hank (View Comment):

    Re: Ron DeSantis and strategy, I wonder if he isn’t deliberately avoiding attacking his fellow Republicans as part of some deeper plan. I mean, Reagan laid down his eleventh commandment for a reason. Aside from that, by not insulting his opponents he’s not insulting their backers by proxy. When another candidate drops, his voters might remember attacks from Trump and Haley and decide that DeSantis is an acceptable second choice.

    Just a couple thoughts.

    Agreed. But where was Mr. Olsen when DeSantis was pointing out 1) he can run for two terms while Trump cannot and 2) nominate him, and the election is about policy and the future, and not Mr. Trump’s legal problems? DeSantis did plenty to distinguish himself from Trump. The main problem was that Trump voters were never going to support DeSantis, because they love Trump, not conservative policies. I was surprised DeSantis got in this time, while Trump was still around. But maybe he also worries there won’t be a country anymore by 2028.

    Or Trump voters love conservative policies, loved the most conservative administration since Reagan, and don’t want to give legitimacy to Democrat lawfare by allowing Trump to be taken out that way. Half of one, six dozen of the other.

    • #24
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