A Life Nearly Destroyed

 

Does the name K.T. McFarland ring a bell? A woman who served in three administrations, was frequently interviewed on Fox News, suddenly disappeared. She decided to leave the country before her life was completely wiped out. And now she’s written a book to describe this nightmare.

Most of us are aware of the travesty of an investigation against Michael Flynn, which is now being exposed. But K.T. McFarlane was victimized as well when she worked under Michael Flynn, who was then NSA Adviser, as she describes in her new book, Revolution: Trump, Washington and We the People. The FBI decided that she was either involved with the Russian collusion case or tried to entrap her through their interviews of her. McFarland describes their pursuit of her in this way, in an interview with Brian Kilmeade:

‘The FBI showed up at my house unannounced. I was all by myself. They came in and I said, ‘Do I need a lawyer for anything? I have never met with any Russians. I have never dealt with any Russians,’ she explained.

The agents said that while they couldn’t tell her not to get a lawyer, they just wanted a ‘little bit of information’ to help them with the investigation.

‘So, I naively went along with it. The whole time they were setting me up for a perjury trap,’ she told Kilmeade. ‘Because Brian, they seized all of my files, my documents, text messages, cell phones from the period I was in government…They had control of them. They wouldn’t let me have control of them.’

The FBI was relentless in its pursuit of her. They found absolutely nothing. She and her husband finally left the country. She reflected on what had happened during a radio interview:

‘We went to the remotest islands of Scotland,’ she said. ‘And I just tried to think about, ‘what is happening to my country?’

The bureaucrats are in control.

‘They’re a certain group of people who have gotten used to governing and they think it is their divine right,’ she told WMAL. ‘And even if the American voter votes for somebody that wants to get rid of them or change their policies, they feel they have the patriotic duty to overrule election results.

‘And to me, we’re in a very dangerous place.’

If you want a summary of McFarland’s credentials, you’ll find them here:

* * * *

K.T. McFarland has returned to the US and is taking her life back, but what were the emotional and financial losses that she endured through this witch hunt? What about Michael Flynn who was entrapped, or George Papadopoulos or Carter Page or all the others connected to the President who were targeted as a way to destroy Donald Trump? What about all the people who lost everything because of the revolting and disreputable actions of these members of the FBI?

I think it’s time that we stop throwing up our arms in exasperation and saying that nothing can or will happen. These government megalomaniacs must pay a price, whether we are talking about prison time, firing, losing their retirement funds, and public condemnation. Are we going to let our government terrorize not only our public representatives, but the people whom they serve? Since many of them not only lied but committed fraud, they must have consequences. I’m counting on John Durham and AG William Barr to finally dole out punishments that take steps to make whole the people who suffered at the hands of these conspirators.

K.T. McFarland is spoiling for a fight. Will we join her?

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  1. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    First off, never ever talk to anyone in law enforcement without a lawyer. Not anyone. Not Ever. 

    Second, I am afraid to say, that unless Barr does something to these people, this will go on and on. 

    • #1
  2. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    First off, never ever talk to anyone in law enforcement without a lawyer. Not anyone. Not Ever.

    Second, I am afraid to say, that unless Barr does something to these people, this will go on and on.

    You are correct, @bryangstephens. If there are no consequences, they will continue these despicable acts.

    • #2
  3. danok1 Member
    danok1
    @danok1

    Susan Quinn: I’m counting on John Durham and AG William Barr to finally dole out punishments that take steps to make whole the people who suffered at the hands of these conspirators.

    As I noted on another site, Barr and Durham get one shot at this. The first cases they bring have to be absolutely airtight. I can wait a little longer.

    • #3
  4. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    • #4
  5. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    She has been on Larry O’Connor’s show several times, including a couple of days ago:

    http://ricochet.com/podcast/examining-politics/covid-19-daily-special-report-5-4-20-gen-jack-keane-adm-jovita-carranza-k-t-mcfarland/

    • #5
  6. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    danok1 (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn: I’m counting on John Durham and AG William Barr to finally dole out punishments that take steps to make whole the people who suffered at the hands of these conspirators.

    As I noted on another site, Barr and Durham get one shot at this. The first cases they bring have to be absolutely airtight. I can wait a little longer.

    Unfortunately the other guys can keep flubbing up, making mistakes, and talking carelessly, and they can keep on trucking. We cannot. One mistake and we’re done. Our own will throw us under the bus.

    • #6
  7. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker
    @JennaStocker

    Excellent post, @susanquinn And it also exposes (once again) the mainstream media who fail to cover this story. They claim to represent facts and stories important to the American people s as do pursue the truth. We hear endless self-aggrandizing about them speaking truth to power. Instead what they fail to report speaks to their pursuit of an agenda – and it’s not in defense of the American people.

    • #7
  8. Tex929rr Coolidge
    Tex929rr
    @Tex929rr

    I’m more and more shocked (and not like Captain Renault) as this is slowly uncovered.  This is the sort of thing for which the only logical solution is disbanding the agency and firing everyone.  Bring in a new slate of leaders from the outside and start over.  And it will never happen.  

    • #8
  9. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    danok1 (View Comment):
    As I noted on another site, Barr and Durham get one shot at this. The first cases they bring have to be absolutely airtight. I can wait a little longer.

    These are pretty savvy men. I am counting on their knowing how important those first cases will be.

    • #9
  10. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Tex929rr (View Comment):
    This is the sort of thing for which the only logical solution is disbanding the agency and firing everyone.

    Amen!

    • #10
  11. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    I’m more and more shocked (and not like Captain Renault) as this is slowly uncovered. This is the sort of thing for which the only logical solution is disbanding the agency and firing everyone. Bring in a new slate of leaders from the outside and start over. And it will never happen.

    At the very least, some key people at the top must go. And I believe Christopher Wray should be included.

    • #11
  12. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Arahant (View Comment):

    She has been on Larry O’Connor’s show several times, including a couple of days ago:

    http://ricochet.com/podcast/examining-politics/covid-19-daily-special-report-5-4-20-gen-jack-keane-adm-jovita-carranza-k-t-mcfarland/

    I’ve heard her on his show and others. I find her extremely credible. And it makes me furious to know how she was treated.

    • #12
  13. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    I want to go further. The FBI has been corrupt from the beginning. That is not to say every FBI employee, but the organization and its leadership has been corrupt during most of its existence. Presidents have had to fear the FBI director. That is not how it should be in a republic.

    • #13
  14. Arahant Member
    Arahant
    @Arahant

    Susan Quinn (View Comment):
    And it makes me furious to know how she was treated.

    Same here, but I am even more furious when I think about the law has been treated. We are supposed to be a nation of laws, not of men. Ha, ha, ha! Not with these jaspers trying to run things.

    • #14
  15. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker
    @JennaStocker

    Arahant (View Comment):

    I want to go further. The FBI has been corrupt from the beginning. That is not to say every FBI employee, but the organization and its leadership has been corrupt during most of its existence. Presidents have had to fear the FBI director. That is not how it should be in a republic.

    Yes! Too much power; too little accountability.

    • #15
  16. Unsk Member
    Unsk
    @Unsk

    Great Post Susan!

    “At the very least, some key people at the top must go. And I believe Christopher Wray should be included.”

    Wray is now in the crosshairs. He knew that Flynn was being set illegally for at least two years and did nothing to stop it.  If Barr doesn’t prosecute him, Barr is toast. But I believe Barr is holding back in an attempt to get bigger fish, like one named Buraq Hussein, who is implicated in the meetings to frame Flynn directly after January 4th 2017 when the FBI agents on the case reported to then FBI Director Comey they  wanted to exonerate Flynn and end his investigation because there was no evidence he committed a crime. 

    • #16
  17. She Reagan
    She
    @She

    Arahant (View Comment):

    I want to go further. The FBI has been corrupt from the beginning. That is not to say every FBI employee, but the organization and its leadership has been corrupt during most of its existence. Presidents have had to fear the FBI director. That is not how it should be in a republic.

    I regret that I only have one like, etc. etc.

    • #17
  18. SkipSul Member
    SkipSul
    @skipsul

    Arahant (View Comment):

    I want to go further. The FBI has been corrupt from the beginning. That is not to say every FBI employee, but the organization and its leadership has been corrupt during most of its existence. Presidents have had to fear the FBI director. That is not how it should be in a republic.

    Nobody can read about J. Edgar and conclude anything else.  That was one seriously creepy SOB.

    • #18
  19. PHCheese Member
    PHCheese
    @PHCheese

    If the FBI rings your door go to the place you keep your duct tape and place a generous piece over your mouth and then say nothing.

    • #19
  20. Hoyacon Member
    Hoyacon
    @Hoyacon

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    I’m more and more shocked (and not like Captain Renault) as this is slowly uncovered. This is the sort of thing for which the only logical solution is disbanding the agency and firing everyone. Bring in a new slate of leaders from the outside and start over. And it will never happen.

    You can’t burn the whole place down because of civil service rules, but you can replace those who are considered political appointments and move others to undesirable positions.  I’m not too familiar with how that’s structured at the FBI, but replacing the “politicals” in government is something that has not been the Administration’s strongest suit.

     

    • #20
  21. Hang On Member
    Hang On
    @HangOn

    I heard her say something that was extremely interesting about Flynn. He was planning to reorganize all the national security agencies. Put this together with the fact that there is NO counterintelligence capability in our security agencies so they have been thoroughly penetrated by just about every foreign intelligence agency on the planet and it all makes sense.

    • #21
  22. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    danok1 (View Comment):

    Susan Quinn: I’m counting on John Durham and AG William Barr to finally dole out punishments that take steps to make whole the people who suffered at the hands of these conspirators.

    As I noted on another site, Barr and Durham get one shot at this. The first cases they bring have to be absolutely airtight. I can wait a little longer.

    Unfortunately the other guys can keep flubbing up, making mistakes, and talking carelessly, and they can keep on trucking. We cannot. One mistake and we’re done. Our own will throw us under the bus.

    Yes. Some will do it even if we don’t, because they hate Trump so much. 

     

    • #22
  23. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    I’m more and more shocked (and not like Captain Renault) as this is slowly uncovered. This is the sort of thing for which the only logical solution is disbanding the agency and firing everyone. Bring in a new slate of leaders from the outside and start over. And it will never happen.

    You can’t burn the whole place down because of civil service rules, but you can replace those who are considered political appointments and move others to undesirable positions. I’m not too familiar with how that’s structured at the FBI, but replacing the “politicals” in government is something that has not been the Administration’s strongest suit.

     

    Ignore the rules. Burn it down anyway. Wipe out the department to a man. Then start over. Same with CIA. 

    • #23
  24. Bill Gates Will Inject You Now Member
    Bill Gates Will Inject You Now
    @Pseudodionysius

    She (View Comment):

    Arahant (View Comment):

    I want to go further. The FBI has been corrupt from the beginning. That is not to say every FBI employee, but the organization and its leadership has been corrupt during most of its existence. Presidents have had to fear the FBI director. That is not how it should be in a republic.

    I regret that I only have one like, etc. etc.

    Kennedy Assassination, Anthrax Clown Car of Comey and Muller, etc.

    • #24
  25. Hoyacon Member
    Hoyacon
    @Hoyacon

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    I’m more and more shocked (and not like Captain Renault) as this is slowly uncovered. This is the sort of thing for which the only logical solution is disbanding the agency and firing everyone. Bring in a new slate of leaders from the outside and start over. And it will never happen.

    You can’t burn the whole place down because of civil service rules, but you can replace those who are considered political appointments and move others to undesirable positions. I’m not too familiar with how that’s structured at the FBI, but replacing the “politicals” in government is something that has not been the Administration’s strongest suit.

    Ignore the rules. Burn it down anyway. Wipe out the department to a man. Then start over. Same with CIA.

    C’mon.  That’s impractical unless you want the government tied up in litigation for years.

    And wrecking the CIA top to bottom would be counterproductive.

    • #25
  26. danok1 Member
    danok1
    @danok1

    Hoyacon (View Comment):
    And wrecking the CIA top to bottom would be counterproductive.

    Probably not; I don’t think we could do worse than the CIA. From a review of Legacy of Ashes:

    While the clandestine service was tripping over its cloaks and impaling itself upon its daggers, the primary intelligence gathering mission was neglected and bungled to such an extent that the agency provided no warning whatsoever of Stalin’s atomic bomb, the Korean War, the Chinese entry into that conflict, the Suez crisis, the Hungarian uprising, the building of the Berlin Wall, the Yom Kippur war of 1973, the Iranian revolution, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the Iran/Iraq War, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the collapse of the Soviet Union, Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait, the nuclear tests by India and Pakistan in 1998, and more. The spider at the centre of the web appears to have been wearing a blindfold and earplugs. (Oh, they did predict both the outbreak and outcome of the Six Day War—well, that’s one!)

    We can add the 9/11 attacks, the rise of ISIS, and a few more recent events to that list.

    • #26
  27. Bryan G. Stephens Thatcher
    Bryan G. Stephens
    @BryanGStephens

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    Hoyacon (View Comment):

    Tex929rr (View Comment):

    I’m more and more shocked (and not like Captain Renault) as this is slowly uncovered. This is the sort of thing for which the only logical solution is disbanding the agency and firing everyone. Bring in a new slate of leaders from the outside and start over. And it will never happen.

    You can’t burn the whole place down because of civil service rules, but you can replace those who are considered political appointments and move others to undesirable positions. I’m not too familiar with how that’s structured at the FBI, but replacing the “politicals” in government is something that has not been the Administration’s strongest suit.

    Ignore the rules. Burn it down anyway. Wipe out the department to a man. Then start over. Same with CIA.

    C’mon. That’s impractical unless you want the government tied up in litigation for years.

    And wrecking the CIA top to bottom would be counterproductive.

    Ignore the litigation. 

    Heck, wipe out the courts via Congress. Tear it all down. We don’t need the FBI. It is clear they do nothing to protect America at all. Too harsh? That is 100% their fault for letting things get this bad. 

    As a therapist, I have to avoid not just bad ethics, but looking bad. This is why. I don’t trust anyone in the FBI at all. 

    The CIA does nothing for us, best I can tell. 9-11-01. They did not stop it. I have no confidence at all they can stop anything. Their assessments are always wrong all the time. Same for the State Department. None of these organizations are competent. Seems to me no information is better than bad information. 

    I am done waiting. I want justice. 

     

    • #27
  28. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    Bryan G. Stephens (View Comment):

    First off, never ever talk to anyone in law enforcement without a lawyer. Not anyone. Not Ever.

    Second, I am afraid to say, that unless Barr does something to these people, this will go on and on.

    It is discouraging how much reason we now have to fear engaging law enforcement. 

    For most of my life I have considered myself pro-law-enforcement. When I was a kid I’d take lemonade to the police officers enforcing excessive speeding on the street in front of our house. But I have seen in recent years more abuse of citizens by law enforcement. To the point that a few months ago as I was fearful when one of our town police pulled up alongside me as I started my morning bicycle ride and started asking me questions about where I had come from (I was wearing a reflective vest and my bicycle was festooned with lights for the pre-dawn ride). It turned out that the police officer was looking for some would-be ATM thieves that had ditched their truck in our neighborhood a few minutes earlier. But I didn’t know that at the time, and so hesitated before answering, as I feared that he might be looking for an excuse to cite me, to dig deeper into who I was and what I was doing, or to take me into custody. Preventing and solving real crime will be harder for the police if law enforcement continues to give ordinary citizens more and more reasons to fear talking to them.  I am far less likely now than I was a few years ago to cooperate with a law enforcement person who is investigating something.

    • #28
  29. Hoyacon Member
    Hoyacon
    @Hoyacon

    danok1 (View Comment):

    Hoyacon (View Comment):
    And wrecking the CIA top to bottom would be counterproductive.

    Probably not; I don’t think we could do worse than the CIA. From a review of Legacy of Ashes:

    While the clandestine service was tripping over its cloaks and impaling itself upon its daggers, the primary intelligence gathering mission was neglected and bungled to such an extent that the agency provided no warning whatsoever of Stalin’s atomic bomb, the Korean War, the Chinese entry into that conflict, the Suez crisis, the Hungarian uprising, the building of the Berlin Wall, the Yom Kippur war of 1973, the Iranian revolution, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the Iran/Iraq War, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the collapse of the Soviet Union, Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait, the nuclear tests by India and Pakistan in 1998, and more. The spider at the centre of the web appears to have been wearing a blindfold and earplugs. (Oh, they did predict both the outbreak and outcome of the Six Day War—well, that’s one!)

    We can add the 9/11 attacks, the rise of ISIS, and a few more recent events to that list.

    Skepticism of journalists is often well-founded at Ricochet, as should be books written by journalists on certain topics.  In many instances, the CIA serves as a proxy for “American interests.”  Want to cast the U.S. in a bad light?  Cast the CIA in a bad light.  

    Talking about what we do know (e.g., 9-11) is low-hanging fruit.  Unfortunately, national security agencies don’t have the luxury of putting out press releases on successes.  Considering the world in which we’ve lived since the onset of the Cold War, I can live with the inevitable mistakes because the batting average is likely high and, at bottom, we’re still #1.

    It’s too bad political actors like the John Brennan’s of the world cast doubt on an entire agency and make us question why it’s there.  I’m  pretty confident we’d know it if it wasn’t there.

     

    • #29
  30. Susan Quinn Contributor
    Susan Quinn
    @SusanQuinn

    Hoyacon (View Comment):
    Talking about what we do know (e.g., 9-11) is low-hanging fruit. Unfortunately, national security agencies don’t have the luxury of putting out press releases on successes. Considering the world in which we’ve lived since the onset of the Cold War, I can live with the inevitable mistakes because the batting average is likely high and, at bottom, we’re still #1.

    Good point, @hoyacon. It’s so hard to know whom we can trust anymore.

    • #30