Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Two American Heroes, One American Story

 

[Everything I write here is dross. If you ain’t got the time, go to the link at the end. ‘Murica.]

Tired of bad ‘n blue news and data churning. Time for something inspirational.

A couple of themes I’ve mentioned before but have not braided together. After I retired from the military (and a short stint as a private security guy; yeah, no), I cheated by becoming a DOD contractor. Great job, great people–many of whom I’ve known and worked with for years if not decades, and have the utmost respect for. The work my crew does is often thankless, and everyone who ignored us for a year develops, when the time comes for execution, 20/20 hindsight enabled by the tardy appearance of the Good Idea Fairy. Aside from being one of the most productive elements of the unit (which no one really sees, ’cause we’re that good), we are hands down the happiest element of the unit. I’ve been stopped numerous times in the halls, with people saying in a down-low, surreptitious way, “hey, man, please get me into your directorate.” Dude, I’m just a contractor. My piece of the unit is awesome for multiple reasons, but the fountainhead is the boss.

Wayne P. (“Pat”) Richardson is a retired full-bull Colonel. One of the good ones. One of the best. Call sign “Papa Negro,” he is known throughout Central and South America. He helped grow a lot of officers that are now at higher command and Ministerial levels in the region. Last year, at an exercise, one of the Partner Nation general officers pulled up to talk to Papa Negro and assumed a rigid position of attention, and only chillaxed after multiple admonitions to do so.

Pat was introduced to the elephant early. He was a young Ranger lieutenant during the ill-fated Operation EAGLE CLAW, which met with calamity at the Desert One refueling spot.

After the Rangers, Pat went Special Forces and became geographically affiliated with Latin America. He earned a Bronze Star with “V” device (V stands for valor) in El Salvador during the ’80s. [Note: Pat will, when we get deep in our knickers telling war stories, throw an arm over my shoulder and counsel, “Mongo, when the CIA guy leaves your firebase for the night, that’s the night you’re going to get hit.” Yeah, I know/knew that, but it’s good to get validated now and again.]

Pat chose to be a Foreign Affairs Officer (FAO) and served for years as a military member of numerous US Embassies.

So, when he got promoted in that status to Full Bird Colonel, it was a big deal.

There are villages and orphanages through Latin America that Pat supports in a private capacity. He’s truly an American hero.

But he was born to an American hero. They paved the way.

Published in General
This post was promoted to the Main Feed by a Ricochet Editor at the recommendation of Ricochet members. Like this post? Want to comment? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

There are 10 comments.

Become a member to join the conversation. Or sign in if you're already a member.
  1. ctlaw Coolidge

    Boss Mongo: They paved the way.

    The Chief Master Sgt. looks more your type.

    • #1
    • March 22, 2020, at 11:54 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  2. Percival Thatcher
    PercivalJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Sounds like Pat’s mom could move-and-shake too.

    A critical moment came after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. “My mother was hounding him [dad] about why he wasn’t getting promoted and he didn’t get bitter or mad, he kept a positive attitude,” the colonel said. Unbeknownst to him, she wrote a letter to then-President Lyndon B. Johnson about how much he deserved the promotion that he was denied.

    Colonel Richardson said his dad came home and told his mom “she couldn’t just write to the president about his career and not tell him about it.” The following day, then-Tech. Sgt. Richardson was called into the wing commander’s office where he was presented with his master sergeant stripes.

    • #2
    • March 22, 2020, at 11:58 AM PDT
    • 5 likes
  3. She Reagan
    SheJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Percival (View Comment):

    Sounds like Pat’s mom could move-and-shake too.

    A critical moment came after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. “My mother was hounding him [dad] about why he wasn’t getting promoted and he didn’t get bitter or mad, he kept a positive attitude,” the colonel said. Unbeknownst to him, she wrote a letter to then-President Lyndon B. Johnson about how much he deserved the promotion that he was denied.

    Colonel Richardson said his dad came home and told his mom “she couldn’t just write to the president about his career and not tell him about it.” The following day, then-Tech. Sgt. Richardson was called into the wing commander’s office where he was presented with his master sergeant stripes.

    I noticed that too. Results-oriented overachievers, on all sides. Wonderful post, and thanks for the introduction to an awe-inspiring American family.

    • #3
    • March 22, 2020, at 12:14 PM PDT
    • 6 likes
  4. RightAngles Member

    It’s just one example of what LBJ destroyed. The black nuclear family. Fathers matter.

    • #4
    • March 22, 2020, at 1:05 PM PDT
    • 6 likes
  5. Randy Webster Member

    Percival (View Comment):

    Sounds like Pat’s mom could move-and-shake too.

    A critical moment came after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. “My mother was hounding him [dad] about why he wasn’t getting promoted and he didn’t get bitter or mad, he kept a positive attitude,” the colonel said. Unbeknownst to him, she wrote a letter to then-President Lyndon B. Johnson about how much he deserved the promotion that he was denied.

    Colonel Richardson said his dad came home and told his mom “she couldn’t just write to the president about his career and not tell him about it.” The following day, then-Tech. Sgt. Richardson was called into the wing commander’s office where he was presented with his master sergeant stripes.

    I think the step from tech to master sergeant is fairly hard. My father spent 12 years as a tech sergeant, then got promoted about three times in his last few years of service. He ended as a senior master sergeant, and they would have promoted him to chief if he’d agreed to extend two years.

    • #5
    • March 22, 2020, at 1:27 PM PDT
    • 2 likes
  6. Jim McConnell Member
    Jim McConnellJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Thanks for the inspirational story, Mongo, and — especially, the link.

    With a father like Chief Richardson, it’s no wonder Colonel Richardson is such a success and role model.

    • #6
    • March 22, 2020, at 1:36 PM PDT
    • 4 likes
    • This comment has been edited.
  7. Boss Mongo Member
    Boss Mongo

    Jim McConnell (View Comment):
    With a father like Chief Richardson, it’s no wonder Colonel Richardson is such a success and role model.

    Just between us girls, I love that guy as hard as the day is long.

    • #7
    • March 22, 2020, at 2:13 PM PDT
    • 8 likes
  8. JoelB Member

    Very inspirational and humbling.

    • #8
    • March 23, 2020, at 5:04 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  9. Stad Thatcher

    She (View Comment):
    Results-oriented overachievers

    I look at this phrase and wonder . . . could it be one way to become an overachiever is to be results-oriented in the first place?

    • #9
    • March 23, 2020, at 6:05 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  10. Caryn Thatcher
    CarynJoined in the first year of Ricochet Ricochet Charter Member

    Boss, you are uncanny for writing–or linking–things that make me cry. Beautiful. I hope very much to have the privilege to meet you IRL some day.

    • #10
    • March 23, 2020, at 8:44 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
    • This comment has been edited.