Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. How Lame Is Our Awesome God?

 

“When He rolls up His sleeves / He ain’t just puttin’ on the Ritz” must be one of the least promising ways to begin a worship song ever. Nobody rolling up their sleeves is “puttin’ on the Ritz.” The rolled-up sleeve-position used for manual labor is the opposite of the sleeve-position used for an old-fashioned fancy night out. And yet, that’s how Richard Mullins’s best-known song, Awesome God opens. Mullins himself considered Awesome God something of a failure, remarking, “the thing I like about Awesome God is that it’s one of the worst-written songs that I ever wrote; it’s just poorly crafted.” And yet it’s a song many of us remember fondly. Why?

To be fair, the lyrics get better from there: “There is THUNder in His footsteps / And lightnin’ in His fists.” Although not by much. Awesome God alternates patter in the verses with an expansive chorus, and the patter is hardly scintillating prose, much less verse. (“Eden” rhymes with “be believin’” — really?) The patter does, though, address themes often left out of “Jesus is my boyfriend”-style worship songs. God as Judge. Sin and its wages. God as God not just of happy, shiny, fluffy things, but also of the storm. And, when the song is sung at proper tempo (no slower than Mullins himself performed it), the rapid-fire, syncopated sixteenth-note patter creates an effect that surpasses its individual words. Especially when the worship leader delivers the patter in a half-snarled, half-whispered mutter, as if he’s letting you in on the secret of something dangerous — which he is: Aslan’s not safe, after all, just good. Notice I called the worship leader he. That’s important. Awesome God is made for a masculine musical delivery, and the difference between liking the song and hating it can simply be the difference between having learned it as masculine and driven, or crooning and wimpy.

***

Mullins’s fully-produced release of Awesome God projects a Motown-ish wall of sound, and it’s not bad, but this live recording, imperfect as it is, is more like what I’m used to — and, I think, better reflects what makes the song beloved:

Delivery of the verses must be rough and quick in order to make the expansive chorus satisfying. Else the “uplift” of the chorus becomes cloying. Contrast Mullins in live performance to this well-known Hillsong rendition:

The Hillsong rendition omits the verses entirely, and yet it’s five minutes long — two minutes longer than the original! Mullins’s original is firmly grounded in a folksy natural minor, so that when the chorus blooms into the relative major, it creates an obvious, meaningful contrast with the verses. Hillsong’s rendition, on the other hand, starts with nearly a minute of repetitive, tinkly, slowwww piano riffing on what sounds like Hark the Herald Angels Sing — which you might recognize as a song in a major key. Huh. No wonder so many people hate this song, if that’s what they think it is. And don’t get me started on the wimpy crooning. If you had any snap in your celery before five minutes of this stuff, you wouldn’t afterward.

***

Mullins uses both rhythmic and tonal contrast to create a sense of uplift and expansion in the chorus. The tempo doesn’t change between verse and chorus, but the chorus feels the beat in more expansive chunks: the rapid-fire patter of the verse emphasizes sixteenth notes; the chorus, half notes. The bloom from minor to major in the chorus isn’t any old transition from minor to major, but specifically dropping the root of the chord down a major third from the tonic, a transition which goes “down” (in the root) and “up” (to the relative major) at the same time, broadening the feel of the music. In the key of E minor, often the key of lead sheets for Awesome God, this means dropping from an E minor chord to a C Major. C Major is the plagal or “Amen” chord for G Major, E Minor’s relative major, so dropping the root like this works an “Amen” sound in there, too.

I know of another song, purely secular — indeed, profane, that immediately caught my ear with the same musical hooks. It alternates aggressive patter in the verses with an expansive chorus containing the same chord-root drop down a major third from the tonic. It’s Mr Hurricane by the (short-lived) Montreal group Beast.

There’s a lot to hate about the hectoring, not-quite-native English in the verses of Mr Hurricane. The songwriter is a native French speaker, and it shows in her casual indifference to syllable stress (how “country” ends up rhyming with “me”). Anyone who’s sung liturgical works in French will recognize Francophones’ annoying insouciance on this point. (Poulenc, Messiaen, guys, I know you’re not alone, but I’m looking at you!)

But then, there’s a lot to hate about the patter in Awesome God, too. Still, driving patter, even bad patter, produces the kind of contrast with a lush, expansive chorus that keeps the chorus from becoming cloying. As a bitter, cynical, secular song of deliverance (from a bad marriage, I believe), Mr Hurricane has the wittier lyrics (odd as they are) of the two. But, as Mullins said of Awesome God, when it comes to worship, “what you want them to respond to is not how cleverly you did that; what you want them to respond to is your message.”

***

The way to sing Awesome God on our college campus (where I learned the song) was a little bit honky-tonk, a little bit metal, and when we hit the chorus, the guys (yes, guys) let it all hang out. If the chorus didn’t sound like it could have been on the soundtrack of Lynch’s Dune, we were doing it wrong. It was fun. It was not effeminate. And I think that’s why it was so beloved.

You don’t have to be a man to appreciate music with a more “masculine”, aggressive, delivery. Nor do you have to be a woman to appreciate a softer delivery. Neither do you have to be a male musician to produce aggressive music, nor a female musician to produce softer stuff; although, in vocal music, having men deliver aggressive, masculine material is the easier, less-confusing choice — and, especially in congregational worship, not being needlessly confusing or difficult is typically a good thing.

@LesserSonofBarsham observes, Awesome God is “one of the few worship songs in recent memory that I can think of that don’t require me to strain and sing like a tenor. While I love my church, most Sunday’s I’d be perfectly happy skipping most of the music.” @DNewlander also has fond memories of Awesome God. “I love that song. We used to sing it at our Sunday night Bible study. Sadly, I hate all the versions I’ve found on YT” — because the versions YouTube suggests are the wimpy, croony versions. I maintain Awesome God is fun if you ditch the wimpy crooning and go for the jugular. Adds DNew, “That’s what I meant when I said all the YT versions suck.”

***

Ricochetians who hate Awesome God, on the other hand, tend to have rather different memories of it. Says @Skipsul, Awesome God is

popular because narcissistic praise team “leaders” can exert dictatorial control over congregations by making them repeat the chorus 40 times “this time sing it like you mean it!” while sobbing uncontrollably into the mike and all over their flannel shirts and sandals. (not that I have bad memories of this or anything… or remember the pastor never letting that guy near a microphone ever again…).

Yes, sobbingly repeating the chorus over and over again would be unbearable. I think Hillsong has proven that. Other Ricochetians simply wonder, why be so fond of a song the writer himself admits is poorly-crafted, and which uses what is, after all, a fairly shopworn minor-to-major formula?

On the other hand, formulas become shopworn because they work. They can be employed well or poorly, of course, and sometimes their persistence is annoying — or at least amusing (warning, the Pachelbel Rant is mildly NSFW).

@BishopWash observes,

Then there’s “Our God is an Awesome Battlefield”. When “Battlefield” was in rotation on the radio, I kept singing Awesome God over the song.

How lame is our Awesome God? Lame enough not only to be mangled and overdone in its own right, but to worm its way into at least one secular hit. Beloved by some, hated by others, our Awesome God is lame enough to be a Battlefield.

This thread was inspired by a conversation in Ricochet’s PIT. Thanks to all partPITcipants, named and unnamed.

Published in Religion & Philosophy
This post was promoted to the Main Feed by a Ricochet Editor at the recommendation of Ricochet members. Like this post? Want to comment? Join Ricochet’s growing community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

There are 46 comments.

  1. 1
  2. 2
  1. DrewInWisconsin, Type Monkey Member

    Midget Faded Rattlesnake: And, when the song is sung at proper tempo (no slower than Mullins himself performed it), the rapid-fire, syncopated sixteenth-note patter creates an effect that surpasses its individual words. Especially when the worship leader delivers the patter in a half-snarled, half-whispered mutter, as if he’s letting you in on the secret of something dangerous — which he is: Aslan’s not safe, after all, just good. Notice I called the worship leader he. That’s important. Awesome God is made for a masculine musical delivery, and the difference between liking the song and hating it can simply be the difference between having learned it as masculine and driven, or crooning and wimpy.

    I disagree with this. I don’t think it works no matter who is singing it. Or how. It’s not particularly masculine or feminine. It’s just badly-written as Mullins said.

    As I said back in the PIT (where I prompted this discussion by noting the anniversary of Mullins’ death) if I were to make a list of the best Rich Mullins songs, I don’t know if Awesome God would break the top 100.

    • #1
    • October 13, 2019, at 1:11 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  2. Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… Member

    Good post, Midge.

    The Hillsong version is just dreadful. It completely reverses the meaning of the original. Mullins point is that you better watch out for this Awesome God, or He might give you the Egyptian Plagues or the ol’ Sodom-and-Gomorrah treatment.

    I agree that the original isn’t that great, either, but it is far better than the sappy Hillsong version.

    Hillsong does have some quite good songs. I like Another In The Fire, which just came out this week, I think (YouTube version here).

    • #2
    • October 13, 2019, at 1:28 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  3. OldDanRhody, 7152 Maple Dr. Member

    AAAAAGHHH! You kids and your rock-n-roll music!

    • #3
    • October 13, 2019, at 1:35 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  4. Addiction Is A Choice Member

    “We Built This City On Awesome God”

    • #4
    • October 13, 2019, at 1:44 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  5. Arahant Member

    OldDanRhody (View Comment):

    AAAAAGHHH! You kids and your rock-n-roll music!

    Palate cleanser:

    • #5
    • October 13, 2019, at 2:19 PM PST
    • 8 likes
  6. Midget Faded Rattlesnake Contributor

    Jerry Giordano (Arizona Patrio… (View Comment):
    Hillsong does have some quite good songs. I like Another In The Fire, which just came out this week, I think (YouTube version here).

    The church I’m at now just doesn’t do Christian Contemporary, so it’s been a while since I sang worship music put out by Hillsong. I don’t despise Hillsong in general, especially as a popularizer of worship music for churches that do do Christian Contemporary, but I do notice, when I listen to Hillsong recordings (as opposed to singing Hillsongs with others live in worship) that there’s often something about the lush production that sounds “Jesus is my boyfriend” even when the lyrics aren’t saying that.

    The music I think about most and know best is acoustic, meaning electronic effects and mixing (although even classical-music recordings increasingly do use them unobtrusively) are a somewhat foreign language to me. I realize a recording that doesn’t sound “overproduced” might actually contain more production work than one that does — sometimes even obviously. But there’s a lot about a “highly-produced” sound I’m just not used to, especially when what isn’t being added are those funky, weird touches you wouldn’t expect to find in an acoustic sound in the first place.

    • #6
    • October 13, 2019, at 2:19 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  7. Dave of Barsham Member

    For the record, I’m not a fan of the lyrics really. However, it’s nice to have something that a baritone can sing that also isn’t in the “Jesus is my boyfriend” genre. 

    • #7
    • October 13, 2019, at 2:27 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  8. Midget Faded Rattlesnake Contributor

    DrewInWisconsin, Thought Leader (View Comment):
    As I said back in the PIT (where I prompted this discussion by noting the anniversary of Mullins’ death) if I were to make a list of the best Rich Mullins songs, I don’t know if Awesome God would break the top 100.

    Yes, thanks. Drew does deserve credit for starting the discussion that led to this post.

    • #8
    • October 13, 2019, at 2:28 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  9. Kevin Schulte Member

    DrewInWisconsin, Thought Leader (View Comment):
    if I were to make a list of the best Rich Mullins songs, I don’t know if Awesome God would break the top 100.

    This is what is so great about Rich Mullins. His collection is so rich and thick. Greatest Christian Artist of all time ! Imhop. 

    • #9
    • October 13, 2019, at 2:29 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  10. DrewInWisconsin, Type Monkey Member

    I think I first noticed Mullins leaving behind formula CCM with his album The World As Best As I Remember It, and specifically that song Jacob and 2 Women, the meaning of which I puzzled over many times.

    When the chorus says “this is the world as best as I can remember it” is he saying “this is the stuff I remember best,” or “this is the best stuff that’s happened,” or more painfully “this is as good as it gets.”

    It’s a long cry from Awesome God.

    See also Hard to Get from his posthumously-released The Jesus Record.

    This is the stuff I appreciate; the searching, the doubting, the struggling, the resigned acceptance. Purpose in life is found in somehow turning that into glory.

    • #10
    • October 13, 2019, at 2:39 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  11. Midget Faded Rattlesnake Contributor

    Midget Faded Rattlesnake (View Comment):
    But there’s a lot about a “highly-produced” sound I’m just not used to, especially when what isn’t being added are those funky, weird touches you wouldn’t expect to find in an acoustic sound in the first place.

    Do any of you have favorite examples of using “un-prettified” or just downright weird production in worship music to make it more compelling?

    • #11
    • October 13, 2019, at 2:41 PM PST
    • Like
  12. ShaunaHunt Member

    I think one of my favorite Christian songs is Watch the Lamb by Ray somebody. Our church doesn’t encourage pre-recorded music for our meetings, especially Sacrament Meeting. However, our ASL sister missionaries “signed” to this song and the Spirit was so strong. It’s particularly touching to listen to during Easter. I also love Via Dolorosa by Sandi Patty.

    • #12
    • October 13, 2019, at 2:48 PM PST
    • 1 like
  13. JoelB Member

    The movie Ragamuffin left me with the impression that this song was Rich’s reluctant response to the demand for him to write something with commercial appeal.

    • #13
    • October 13, 2019, at 3:01 PM PST
    • Like
  14. SkipSul Moderator

    Midget Faded Rattlesnake: popular because narcissistic praise team “leaders” can exert dictatorial control over congregations by making them repeat the chorus 40 times “this time sing it like you mean it!” while sobbing uncontrollably into the mike and all over their flannel shirts and sandals. (not that I have bad memories of this or anything… or remember the pastor never letting that guy near a microphone ever again…).

    Minor correction: I was the one who described this, not Amy, though I believe she related something similar.

    • #14
    • October 13, 2019, at 3:05 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  15. Midget Faded Rattlesnake Contributor

    SkipSul (View Comment):

    Midget Faded Rattlesnake: popular because narcissistic praise team “leaders” can exert dictatorial control over congregations by making them repeat the chorus 40 times “this time sing it like you mean it!” while sobbing uncontrollably into the mike and all over their flannel shirts and sandals. (not that I have bad memories of this or anything… or remember the pastor never letting that guy near a microphone ever again…).

    Minor correction: I was the one who described this, not Amy, though I believe she related something similar.

    Apologies! I cut and pasted from the PIT into a doc and must have had one of those attribution errors!

    UPDATE: Fixed!

    • #15
    • October 13, 2019, at 3:10 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  16. Percival Thatcher

    Our “director of music” has been on a tear lately, pulling out the lamest hymns in the Evangelical Lutheran Worship hymnal, and there are some real stinkers in there. Doctrinally sound (most of them), but they omit the “joyful” part of “joyful noise” and it shows. The rejoinder to “We’ve never sung it before” is “There’s a reason for that.”

    • #16
    • October 13, 2019, at 3:15 PM PST
    • 5 likes
  17. Midget Faded Rattlesnake Contributor

    Percival (View Comment):

    Our “director of music” has been on a tear lately, pulling out the lamest hymns in the Evangelical Lutheran Worship hymnal, and there are some real stinkers in there. Doctrinally sound (most of them), but they omit the “joyful” part of “joyful noise” and it shows. The rejoinder to “We’ve never sung it before” is “There’s a reason for that.”

    Are they at least making a somber, penitent noise? Some of my favorite hymns do exactly that. Or just failing all ’round?

    Which are the worst stinkers?

    • #17
    • October 13, 2019, at 3:22 PM PST
    • 1 like
  18. JoelB Member

    When the chorus says “this is the world as best as I can remember it” is he saying “this is the stuff I remember best,” or “this is the best stuff that’s happened,” or more painfully “this is as good as it gets.”

    @drewinwisconsin I think “this is as good as it gets”, at least in this world, is closest to the meaning. Some of the scriptural allusions in this and other songs have taken a good bit of thought on my part before I understood them. The moon that was stolen is Rachel as described in Joseph’s dream. 

    @midgetfadedrattlesnake I agree that there are some songs that need a rough masculine presentation, like How to Grow Up Big and Strong. Olivia Newton-John recorded it and for me the impact was not the same. I don’t see any church using that one as a worship song.

    • #18
    • October 13, 2019, at 3:27 PM PST
    • 1 like
  19. DrewInWisconsin, Type Monkey Member

    JoelB (View Comment):
    @midgetfadedrattlesnake I agree that there are some songs that need a rough masculine presentation, like How to Grow Up Big and Strong. Olivia Newton-John recorded it and for me the impact was not the same. I don’t see any church using that one as a worship song.

    Now that one’s a Mark Heard song, to speak of another artist who left this world too soon.

    Outstanding lyricist, although that particular song is not exemplar of his best efforts.

    Mark Heard’s Dry Bones Dance is in my top ten best albums ever.

    • #19
    • October 13, 2019, at 3:34 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  20. Joseph Stanko Member

    The word “awesome” no longer conveys “awe-inspiring” since it became a generic slang term for “good,” so when I hear the chorus I can’t help but hear “our God is one swell God!”

    • #20
    • October 13, 2019, at 4:43 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  21. Percival Thatcher

    Midget Faded Rattlesnake (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    Our “director of music” has been on a tear lately, pulling out the lamest hymns in the Evangelical Lutheran Worship hymnal, and there are some real stinkers in there. Doctrinally sound (most of them), but they omit the “joyful” part of “joyful noise” and it shows. The rejoinder to “We’ve never sung it before” is “There’s a reason for that.”

    Are they at least making a somber, penitent noise? Some of my favorite hymns do exactly that. Or just failing all ’round?

    Which are the worst stinkers?

    I try not to keep a list. I might as well be surprised the next time they pop up. This one was a song of praise, but it was in a minor key, and the organist (also the director of music) is fond of ritardando. Very fond. As in sometimes I have to fight back the urge to yell at him “Try to keep up … we’re singing up here.”

    • #21
    • October 13, 2019, at 4:57 PM PST
    • 1 like
  22. Midget Faded Rattlesnake Contributor

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):

    The word “awesome” no longer conveys “awe-inspiring” since it became a generic slang term for “good,” so when I hear the chorus I can’t help but hear “our God is one swell God!”

    The verses, flawed as they are, convey enough menace and dread that “Awesome God” in the chorus does read as “awe-inspiring” to me rather than just “one swell God!” Of course, this assumes people are singing a version where the verses are included (and intelligible).

    • #22
    • October 13, 2019, at 5:00 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  23. Dave of Barsham Member

    I do wish there were a set of worship songs that were more geared to men. In their octave and a worship of God as a devotion in service, honor, and sacrifice in the mold of “as Christ did the church” as they were commanded. Men following the Divine Leader with a capital “D” and “L.” Men of God. Those songs just aren’t there.

    • #23
    • October 13, 2019, at 5:08 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  24. DrewInWisconsin, Type Monkey Member

    Fans of Rich Mullins may also be interested in the obscure “Canticle of the Plains” which was a musical about St Francis of Assisi . . . and, well . . . you can read about it HERE.

    Resulted in a really good album, too.

    • #24
    • October 13, 2019, at 5:10 PM PST
    • 1 like
  25. Amy Schley Moderator

    SkipSul (View Comment):

    Midget Faded Rattlesnake: popular because narcissistic praise team “leaders” can exert dictatorial control over congregations by making them repeat the chorus 40 times “this time sing it like you mean it!” while sobbing uncontrollably into the mike and all over their flannel shirts and sandals. (not that I have bad memories of this or anything… or remember the pastor never letting that guy near a microphone ever again…).

    Minor correction: I was the one who described this, not Amy, though I believe she related something similar.

    I was thinking “I don’t remember saying that …”

    Yes, I’m not a fan either.

    • #25
    • October 13, 2019, at 5:10 PM PST
    • Like
  26. Midget Faded Rattlesnake Contributor

    Percival (View Comment):

    Midget Faded Rattlesnake (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):

    Our “director of music” has been on a tear lately, pulling out the lamest hymns in the Evangelical Lutheran Worship hymnal, and there are some real stinkers in there. Doctrinally sound (most of them), but they omit the “joyful” part of “joyful noise” and it shows. The rejoinder to “We’ve never sung it before” is “There’s a reason for that.”

    Are they at least making a somber, penitent noise? Some of my favorite hymns do exactly that. Or just failing all ’round?

    Which are the worst stinkers?

    I try not to keep a list. I might as well be surprised the next time they pop up.

    Heh.

    This one was a song of praise, but it was in a minor key, and the organist (also the director of music) is fond of ritardando. Very fond. As in sometimes I have to fight back the urge to yell at him “Try to keep up … we’re singing up here.”

    Off the top of my head, I can think of two hymns of praise in a minor key, both of which fall flat if they’re too slow. One is “Threefold Truth” by William P Rowan (to distinguish from other settings of the same text).

    The other is the spirited Welsh tune Aberystwyth by Parry. Besides being a dramatic setting of Wesley’s “Jesus, Lover of My Soul” (provided it’s not done too slow), which is a penitential hymn (and a favorite of mine), Aberystwyth is also used to set hymns of praise — including a loose paraphrase of Psalm 29 for Pentecost, “Wind Who Makes All Winds That Blow” (whose purple prose is… better… the faster you get it over with — quick enough and it fools you into thinking the lyrics aren’t as pretentious as they are!)

    There is at least one contemporary setting of “Jesus, Lover of My Soul” that makes me cringe. Really, any setting that’s not Aberystwyth sung at an adequate tempo will make me cringe, since it will probably fail to be desperate and terrifying enough. But it’s horrible when “Jesus, Lover of My Soul” goes the “Jesus is my boyfriend” route (rather than, I dunno, Jesus as the only entity who can love your crooked, tainted soul and your one last, desperate hope).

    Other times, though, I’m pleasantly surprised by a contemporary setting of a hymn that’s better than the old-fashioned. “O Love That Will Not Let Me Go” is one example. The old-fashioned setting is a snooze. This is not. Indeed, it’s rather jaunty:

    • #26
    • October 13, 2019, at 5:43 PM PST
    • 2 likes
  27. Joseph Stanko Member

    Midget Faded Rattlesnake (View Comment):

    Joseph Stanko (View Comment):

    The word “awesome” no longer conveys “awe-inspiring” since it became a generic slang term for “good,” so when I hear the chorus I can’t help but hear “our God is one swell God!”

    The verses, flawed as they are, convey enough menace and dread that “Awesome God” in the chorus does read as “awe-inspiring” to me rather than just “one swell God!” Of course, this assumes people are singing a version where the verses are included (and intelligible).

    I’ve never sung the song before, nor heard it sung, so I’ll take your word for it.

    • #27
    • October 13, 2019, at 6:17 PM PST
    • 1 like
  28. Percival Thatcher

    Midget Faded Rattlesnake (View Comment):

    Off the top of my head, I can think of two hymns of praise in a minor key, both of which fall flat if they’re too slow. One is “Threefold Truth” by William P Rowan (to distinguish from other settings of the same text).

    The other is the spirited Welsh tune Aberystwyth by Parry. Besides being a dramatic setting of Wesley’s “Jesus, Lover of My Soul” (provided it’s not done too slow), which is a penitential hymn (and a favorite of mine), Aberystwyth is also used to set hymns of praise — including a loose paraphrase of Psalm 29 for Pentecost, “Wind Who Makes All Winds That Blow” (whose purple prose is… better… the faster you get it over with — quick enough and it fools you into thinking the lyrics aren’t as pretentious as they are!)

    I don’t reject minor key hymns out of hand. This one had repetitive lyrics and we went into it slow to begin with. “Dirge of praise” would have been more accurate. That plus unfamiliarity with the melody kept most of the congregation silent, or at least singing with less than full confidence. These people can shake the dust off of the rafters with “How Great Thou Art.” And when you let them loose on “For All the Saints” — man, that’s singing.

    • #28
    • October 13, 2019, at 6:37 PM PST
    • 3 likes
  29. Midget Faded Rattlesnake Contributor

    Percival (View Comment):
    I don’t reject minor key hymns out of hand. This one had repetitive lyrics and we went into it slow to begin with. “Dirge of praise” would have been more accurate.

    Now I’m imagining “If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands” transposed into a minor key, sung verrrrry slowwwwwly…

    If God is the Lord, clap your hands (Clap……………………………… clap)
    If God is the Lord, clap your hands (Clap……………………………… clap)
    If God is Lord and you know it…… then this song will surely show it…….
    If God is the Lord, clap your hands (Clap
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    clap)

    • #29
    • October 13, 2019, at 6:50 PM PST
    • 4 likes
  30. Percival Thatcher

    Midget Faded Rattlesnake (View Comment):

    Percival (View Comment):
    I don’t reject minor key hymns out of hand. This one had repetitive lyrics and we went into it slow to begin with. “Dirge of praise” would have been more accurate.

    Now I’m imagining “If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands” transposed into a minor key, sung verrrrry slowwwwwly…

    If God is the Lord, clap your hands (Clap……………………………… clap)
    If God is the Lord, clap your hands (Clap……………………………… clap)
    If God is Lord and you know it…… then this song will surely show it…….
    If God is the Lord, clap your hands (Clap
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    clap)

    • #30
    • October 13, 2019, at 6:53 PM PST
    • 1 like
  1. 1
  2. 2