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February Summit on Clerical Sexual Abuse: The Inaction of a Corrupt Church

 

Back in September of 2018, I reported on the call by Pope Francis to have the presidents of the Catholic Church’s bishops conferences meet in Rome in February 2019 to deal with the clerical sexual abuse crisis in the Church. Today, the Vatican released new details on this summit:

The February Meeting on the protection of minors has a concrete purpose: the goal is that all of the Bishops clearly understand what they need to do to prevent and combat the worldwide problem of the sexual abuse of minors. Pope Francis knows that a global problem can only be resolved with a global response. The Pope wants it to be an assembly of Pastors, not an academic conference – a meeting characterized by prayer and discernment, a catechetical and working gathering.

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Busan (fiction)

 

My chair is pushed back just a bit from the table in front of me. A low light hangs over it, piercing the cloud of cigarette smoke and illuminating the rough and desperate faces that surround it. Waitresses circulate, wearing clothes too close cut to be appropriate in any normal establishment. Of course, this place […]

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McCarrick, Bernardin, Bergoglio, and Satan.

 

In May of 2015, I wrote about Alfred Hitchcock’s Catholicism, evident in his many amazingly crafted movies. It seems that one can always draw some interesting insights from Hitch, particularly as it relates to the nature of evil and the tactics of evil men and women. Here’s an excerpt from my post:

Hitchcock’s dark world is perhaps most vividly described in Shadow of a Doubt by Uncle Charlie, Charles Oakley (Joseph Cotten) who describes what the world is really like to his niece Charlie (Charlotte) played by Teresa Wright, after she discovers that her uncle is indeed the psychotic serial killer of wealthy widows on the run from the law whom a detective has warned her about. At night, in a Santa Rosa bar, Uncle Charlie chases down and confronts his troubled namesake and niece:

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Book Review: Surprised by Christ

 

How does a Hasidic Jew, the son, and grandson of rabbis, become an Orthodox Christian? The journey is a fascinating one, as A. James Bernstein relates in a book that is one part personal autobiography, and the other part his spiritual journey from the Judaism of his youth through what he describes as the return to the fulfillment of Judaism’s promise in the Orthodox Church. In his tale, Father Bernstein takes readers from his initial discovery of Christianity as a young man, through his years as an Evangelical street preacher in Berkley, and back to Israel both past and present as he seeks to re-find the ancient Jewish connection to Christianity.

Bernstein begins with a vivid recollection of when a drunk anti-semite threw a brick through his father’s storefront in the middle of the night in Queens, NY. Though James was born in the US during World War II, his parents had wed in the early 1930s, and had fled Jerusalem (where his father was from) for the US (his mother was from Pittsburgh) out of fear that the Muslim Mufti of the region would ally with the Nazis. The horrors of the war and the revelations of the Holocaust broke much of his father’s faith, and though trained as a Rabbi in his youth, in America he instead chose to run a candy store.

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Islam in Modern Politics ft. Charles Adams | Ep. 11

 

As the fastest growing and second largest religion in the world, Islam is a religious force that has had a significant impact throughout the world. It has been used to create theocracies in the Middle East, has changed the cultural landscape of many Western nations, and is controversial altogether within the Western World. Charlie Adams joins […]

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While Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard has come under deserved fire for defending Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad, Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are applauding Gabbard today for being the only Democrat willing to stand up to Senate Democrats who contend that being a member of the Knights of Columbus is disqualifying for service as a federal judge. They also brace for the imminent presidential campaign of California Sen. Kamala Harris, who is very liberal but is one of only a few Democrats with a legitimate shot at the nomination. And, as more stories emerge of the fiscal hardship of federal employees going without pay during the partial shutdown, they are staggered by statistics showing that nearly 80 percent of Americans live paycheck to paycheck and over 60 percent don’t have enough money saved to cover six months of expenses.

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Report from Urbana: Mainstream Evangelical Culture Responds to Racism, Politics, and Obsessing over the Eschaton

 

Last week I went to Urbana, the triennial missions conference of Intervarsity Christian Fellowship. (You’ve read Elisabeth Elliot’s Through Gates of Splendor? When she mentions in the first chapter that her husband Jim Elliot’s journey began after he attended “a large convention . . . at the University of Illinois for students who were interested in foreign missionary work” in 1948, I’m pretty sure she’s talking about Urbana.)

It was quite an experience: 10,000 people converged on a St. Louis convention center for five days of seminars, Bible study, praise-and-worship songs, organization fairs, and meeting people.

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The Writ of Heaven

 

I’ve decided to publish my speech in Synagogue from last week. It was well received, so perhaps you might enjoy it… As children we read the story of Yetziat Mitzraim (Exodus from Egypt) in a very simple way: Hashem (G-d) chooses Moshe (Moses). Moshe ate a bunch of coals when he was a kid. So, […]

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Icon, Part 6: Theophany

 

Rejoice, O River Jordan, be glad; for within thee the Maker of all things now is here, moved by mercy to seek at a servant’s hand saving Baptism for our sakes. Dance, be glad, O Adam, and, O Eve, our foremother; God supremely good, Who is redemption for all men, is come down to dwell with us.

The Torrent of Delight, Who is Master of all things, doth come unto the river’s swift streams to be baptized; for He willed to give me drink of waters that purify. And when John beheld Him, he cried out to Him, saying: How shall I stretch out my hand upon Thy divine head, whereat all things quake with fear? Orthros Kathisma of the Fore-feast of Theophany

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What does it mean to say “I’m a Catholic”

 

“To be a ‘cultural Catholic,’ say, or a ‘cultural Jew’ is to align with a group as much as it is to assent to a set of philosophical or spiritual propositions, and to say you are one or the other is increasingly more about your chosen community than about what you believe.” This is a […]

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QOTD: Who Can Possibly Know What is Best for You—Except You?

 

Whatever happens, it was designated long ago and it was known that it would happen; as for man he cannot contend with what is stronger than he. Often, much talk means futility. How does it benefit a man? Who can possibly know what is best for a man to do in life-the few days of […]

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The Contract (fiction)

 

The thin material of the door thwacks weakly as I knock on it. I’m in the middle of a long hallway – made up of prefab building blocks linked together. The place looks decent, but the lines where the sections meet are marked by little bumps in the carpet and the walls. Nothing lines up […]

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Truth is no defense in Europe when discussing Islam

 

This case was discussed on Ricochet a couple of months ago. This women was convicted of potentially hurting the feelings of Muslims for stating the truth about one of Mohammad’s brides. More

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America conclude the Three Martini Lunch Award season by announcing their choices for person of the year and turncoat of the year. They also make their fearless predictions for 2019.

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Grinding Love

 

Whatever it is that ends a life prematurely, however that person might have distanced loved ones, those left behind inevitably wonder what more might have been done to help. We feel keenly the broken bond and desperately imagine how it could have been mended.

Sometimes I recall my time looking after my grandmother in her final years and regret how little attention I paid her in exhaustion or want of time for selfish pursuits. Then I realize how similarly I limit time with my parents, friends, and others to return to separate affairs.

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Is the Original New Testament Lost?

 

Most of the books of the New Testament date back to the 1st Century. Many New Testament scholars believe that 1st Thessalonians is the first book to have been written by Paul around the year 50. But some scholars date 1st Thessalonians earlier than that. The problem we have now is that we don’t have […]

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