My Trip to Martha’s Vineyard

 

I have a credit card that gives airline frequent-flier miles. In July, I received an offer for an all-expenses-paid tour of Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard. Neither I nor my wife had ever been there, so we combined it with visiting my mom in New Hampshire. On September 9, we went on a whale-watching cruise from Provincetown. Here are two pictures I took of a Humpback whale called Freckles.


On September 10, we took the ferry to beautiful Martha’s Vineyard. It’s hard for riffraff to get to the island, but somehow Ken Burns and Caroline Kennedy live there. We visited Edgartown, where Kennedy gave his Chappaquiddick speech with the neck brace. It’s a very short boat ride between the two islands. Here are a few pictures from the migrant non-sanctuary.



We were on a 15-person bus touring the island. There were certain public roads we were not allowed to traverse. When you’re a sanctuary island, it’s vital that you keep the public out. Given that many of the houses are only occupied part of the year, they could easily house thousands of illegals. And I’m sure that they’d leave the houses spotless. Why should the border towns of Texas have all the fun?

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  1. BDB Coolidge
    BDB
    @BDB

    Richard Easton: Here are two pictures I took of a Humpback whale called Freckles.

    Racist.

    • #1
  2. Ekosj Member
    Ekosj
    @Ekosj

    “This is a big country. The idea we can’t accommodate more people in the interests of the United States, and by the way… guess what? They’re the reason why – the illegal and as well as undocumented – are the reason why our society is functioning. The reason why our economy is growing.  We don’t talk about that. We stand up and act like it’s a burden, it is not a burden, it is a gift.”  – FJB

    How rude of MV to refuse to accept such a precious gift.

    • #2
  3. Misthiocracy has never Member
    Misthiocracy has never
    @Misthiocracy

    Richard Easton: Given that many of the houses are only occupied part of the year, they could easily house thousands of illegals.

    “Yes. This is a better arrangement, comrades. More just.”

    • #3
  4. Old Bathos Moderator
    Old Bathos
    @OldBathos

    In another century when the open border spigot overwhelms even the enclaves of the lovely ones on MV, descendants of the recent 50 people temporarily excluded from MV will be likely harpooning descendants of Freckles.

    • #4
  5. Richard Easton Coolidge
    Richard Easton
    @RichardEaston

    BDB (View Comment):

    Richard Easton: Here are two pictures I took of a Humpback whale called Freckles.

    Racist.

    You comment is by definition true since everything is racist.

    • #5
  6. EODmom Coolidge
    EODmom
    @EODmom

    Old Bathos (View Comment):

    In another century when the open border spigot overwhelms even the enclaves of the lovely ones on MV, descendants of the recent 50 people temporarily excluded from MV will be likely harpooning descendants of Freckles.

    Do you think it will take that long? Interest on federal debt soon to be the largest item in the budget. The money spigot soon to be off. 

    • #6
  7. Hang On Member
    Hang On
    @HangOn

    I thought de Santis was just trying ro solve the servant problem on Martha’s Vineyard. 

    • #7
  8. Richard Easton Coolidge
    Richard Easton
    @RichardEaston

    Hang On (View Comment):

    I thought de Santis was just trying ro solve the servant problem on Martha’s Vineyard.

    From a parody Twitter account

    • #8
  9. Vance Richards Member
    Vance Richards
    @VanceRichards

    I did a tour of Martha’s Vineyard last summer. Although I spend a lot of time on the Cape, I had not been to the island since I was a child.

    A couple things I noticed, you don’t say Gay Head anymore. Now you have to use the Indian name, which is probably better. Less giggles from the kids.

    They still talk endlessly about Jaws. Fun film, but hasn’t anything else happened over the past 45 years?

    According to the tour guide, Clinton was really friendly (Bill, obviously), but Obama has the secret service keep people far away from him.

     I wonder if they won’t erect a miniature Statue of Liberty in honor of the 36 hours they spent dealing with illegal immigrants. It would be a good way to give the tour guides another non-Jaws topic.

    • #9
  10. RushBabe49 Thatcher
    RushBabe49
    @RushBabe49

    This works, I think.

    • #10
  11. Mad Gerald Coolidge
    Mad Gerald
    @Jose

    I’m surprised James Taylor didn’t play for the migrants.  He lives in Martha’s Vineyard.

    • #11
  12. BDB Coolidge
    BDB
    @BDB

    Mad Gerald (View Comment):

    I’m surprised James Taylor didn’t play for the migrants. He lives in Martha’s Vineyard.

    He doesn’t know the lyrics to La Cucaracha.

    • #12
  13. Mad Gerald Coolidge
    Mad Gerald
    @Jose

    Diversify Martha’s Vineyard!  Bring Equity to America’s Most Exclusive Enclave!

     

    • #13
  14. CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill Coolidge
    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill
    @CarolJoy

    Apparently there has been a secret  addition to The US Bill Of Rights that stipulates  that no US citizenry who is not living in a town or city or region considered to be a “border town” should ever have to lay eyes on newly arrived immigrants.

    San Francisco – despite being 7 & 1/2 hour drive from the southern border – is a border town.

    So is Brownsville Tx,  Naco Az, and hundreds of other places.

    Clearly Martha’s Village is not a border town. The officials in that luxury town are well aware of the provisions of the secret addition to the US Bill Of Rights.

    • #14
  15. Skyler Coolidge
    Skyler
    @Skyler

    I’m related to about half the permanent residents of Nantucket, not the rich ones, the other ones.  My grandmother worked as a housekeeper all her life.  When my mother was a child they would go to the neighbors home to take a bath.  We don’t have anything to do with “those” people on the Vineyard.  :)

    The library where I used to read all the Wizard of Oz books when we went there in the summers was where Frederick Douglass and other abolitionists used to give speeches.  It’s an idyllic place.  I don’t know if Nantucket is a sanctuary city, I don’t follow their politics, it’s where I go to escape that stuff.  

    • #15
  16. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    Skyler (View Comment):
    We don’t have anything to do with “those” people on the Vineyard.

    The Vineyard was always more like Falmouth in terms of its wealth. It was known mostly for its Christian camp–there were partner camps in Craigsville and West Yarmouth on the Cape Cod mainland. It had some wealthy homes, as Falmouth had, but for the most part it was solidly middle- and lower-income people. The money that has moved there  in recent years is new money. 

    It has never been a wealthy enclave like Nantucket. 

    It’s strange to see the Vineyard being described in the press as a wealthy place. Perhaps it is now, but if so, that’s a change.

    What I also find funny about the whole story is that the Vineyard has a thriving tourism–“day trippers”–economy. The islanders are used to greeting and managing thousands of tourists–strangers–every single day. I can’t imagine why fifty people threw them for a loop. 

    The only thing I can think is that the islanders are used to getting the day trippers off the island by the end of the day. They are very practiced and systematic about it. Sort of the way Disney World clears out their parks at closing time. So fifty stranded day trippers after the last Falmouth-bound ferries departed may have unsettled them. :-)

    • #16
  17. Front Seat Cat Member
    Front Seat Cat
    @FrontSeatCat

    Yes – that McMansion of Obama’s – the big roof could make so many little roofs…..I think that’s a line from a movie.  Great pictures – they seem to have a Great White threatening the beaches every year.

    • #17
  18. Skyler Coolidge
    Skyler
    @Skyler

    MarciN (View Comment):

    Skyler (View Comment):
    We don’t have anything to do with “those” people on the Vineyard.

    The Vineyard was always more like Falmouth in terms of its wealth. It was known mostly for its Christian camp–there were partner camps in Craigsville and West Yarmouth on the Cape Cod mainland. It had some wealthy homes, as Falmouth had, but for the most part it was solidly middle- and lower-income people. The money that has moved there in recent years is new money.

    It has never been a wealthy enclave like Nantucket.

    It’s strange to see the Vineyard being described in the press as a wealthy place. Perhaps it is now, but if so, that’s a change.

    What I also find funny about the whole story is that the Vineyard has a thriving tourism–“day trippers”–economy. The islanders are used to greeting and managing thousands of tourists–strangers–every single day. I can’t imagine why fifty people threw them for a loop.

    The only thing I can think is that the islanders are used to getting the day trippers off the island by the end of the day. They are very practiced and systematic about it. Sort of the way Disney World clears out their parks at closing time. So fifty stranded day trippers after the last Falmouth-bound ferries departed may have unsettled them. :-)

    Interesting. Nantucket is more known for its historical Quaker population, though I don’t think many are left.  There was great wealth made there from whaling, by families still widely known today:  Macy, Chase, etc.

    • #18
  19. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    What made Nantucket a wealthy tourist destination was that the whaling industry shut down rather suddenly, and the wealthy families left their homes there intact, which made the island a historical frozen-in-time treasure:  

    In the beginning of the 17th century, whaling on Nantucket was usually done from small boats launched from the island’s shores, which would tow killed whales to be processed on the beach. These boats were only about seven meters long, with mostly Wampanoag manpower, sourced from a system of debt servitude established by English Nantucketers—a typical boat’s crew had five Wampanoag oarsmen and a single white Nantucketer at the steering oar. Author Nathaniel Philbrick notes that “without the native population, which outnumbered the white population well into the 1720s, the island would never have become a successful whaling port.”

    Nantucket’s dependence on trade with Britain, derived from its whaling and supporting industries, influenced its leading citizens to remain neutral during the American Revolutionary War, favoring neither the British nor the Patriots.

    Herman Melville commented on Nantucket’s whaling dominance in Moby-Dick, Chapter 14: “Two thirds of this terraqueous globe are the Nantucketer’s. For the sea is his; he owns it, as Emperors own empires.” The Moby-Dick characters Ahab and Starbuck are both from Nantucket. The tragedy that inspired Melville to write his novel Moby-Dick was the final voyage of the Nantucket whaler Essex.

    The island suffered great economic hardships, worsened by the “Great Fire” of July 13, 1846, that, fueled by whale oil and lumber, devastated the main town, burning some 40 acres (16 hectares). The fire left hundreds homeless and poverty-stricken, and many people left the island. By 1850, whaling was in decline, as Nantucket’s whaling industry had been surpassed by that of New Bedford. Another contributor to the decline was the silting up of the harbor, which prevented large whaling ships from entering and leaving the port, unlike New Bedford, which still owned a deep water port. In addition, the development of railroads made mainland whaling ports, such as New Bedford, more attractive because of the ease of transshipment of whale oil onto trains, an advantage unavailable to an island. The American Civil War dealt the death blow to the island’s whaling industry, as virtually all of the remaining whaling vessels were destroyed by Confederate commerce raiders. 

    As a result of this depopulation, the island was left under-developed and isolated until the mid-20th century. The isolation kept many of the pre-Civil War buildings intact and, by the 1950s, enterprising developers began buying up large sections of the island and restoring them to create an upmarket destination for wealthy people in the Northeastern United States.

    It was the Steamship Authority in the 1960s that turned Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard into the tourist attractions they are today. 

     

    • #19
  20. Skyler Coolidge
    Skyler
    @Skyler

    MarciN (View Comment):

    What made Nantucket a wealthy tourist destination was that the whaling industry shut down rather suddenly, and the wealthy families left their homes there intact, which made the island a historical frozen-in-time treasure:

    In the beginning of the 17th century, whaling on Nantucket was usually done from small boats launched from the island’s shores, which would tow killed whales to be processed on the beach. These boats were only about seven meters long, with mostly Wampanoag manpower, sourced from a system of debt servitude established by English Nantucketers—a typical boat’s crew had five Wampanoag oarsmen and a single white Nantucketer at the steering oar. Author Nathaniel Philbrick notes that “without the native population, which outnumbered the white population well into the 1720s, the island would never have become a successful whaling port.”

    Nantucket’s dependence on trade with Britain, derived from its whaling and supporting industries, influenced its leading citizens to remain neutral during the American Revolutionary War, favoring neither the British nor the Patriots.

    Herman Melville commented on Nantucket’s whaling dominance in Moby-Dick, Chapter 14: “Two thirds of this terraqueous globe are the Nantucketer’s. For the sea is his; he owns it, as Emperors own empires.” The Moby-Dick characters Ahab and Starbuck are both from Nantucket. The tragedy that inspired Melville to write his novel Moby-Dick was the final voyage of the Nantucket whaler Essex.

    The island suffered great economic hardships, worsened by the “Great Fire” of July 13, 1846, that, fueled by whale oil and lumber, devastated the main town, burning some 40 acres (16 hectares). The fire left hundreds homeless and poverty-stricken, and many people left the island. By 1850, whaling was in decline, as Nantucket’s whaling industry had been surpassed by that of New Bedford. Another contributor to the decline was the silting up of the harbor, which prevented large whaling ships from entering and leaving the port, unlike New Bedford, which still owned a deep water port. In addition, the development of railroads made mainland whaling ports, such as New Bedford, more attractive because of the ease of transshipment of whale oil onto trains, an advantage unavailable to an island. The American Civil War dealt the death blow to the island’s whaling industry, as virtually all of the remaining whaling vessels were destroyed by Confederate commerce raiders.

    As a result of this depopulation, the island was left under-developed and isolated until the mid-20th century. The isolation kept many of the pre-Civil War buildings intact and, by the 1950s, enterprising developers began buying up large sections of the island and restoring them to create an upmarket destination for wealthy people in the Northeastern United States.

    It was the Steamship Authority in the 1960s that turned Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard into the tourist attractions they are today.

     

    Yep.  It’s grown a lot since I was a kid but still no stop lights. 

    • #20
  21. BDB Coolidge
    BDB
    @BDB

    MarciN (View Comment):
    Author Nathaniel Philbrick notes that

    Philbrick is magnificent.   I recommend everything he’s written, whether I’ve read it or not.

    • #21
  22. Chowderhead Coolidge
    Chowderhead
    @Podunk

    Before Obama’s house on the island, I was working on the well at Oak Bluffs. It required 3-4 trips with a two hour drive to get to the ferry in Falmouth at 6:30am. The first ferry trip is all workers. The rest of the day is all tourists.

    Sometimes the cell service was great, sometimes it was terrible. I complained to a local. He said that they always increase the power when a Kennedy is on the island then cut it down when they leave.

    Personally the cape and the islands are a terrible place to live. There are only two bridges to the cape. Once there all you have is expensive motels, soft-serv ice cream, and fried food. I need to be paid to go anywhere near there. 

    • #22
  23. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    BDB (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):
    Author Nathaniel Philbrick notes that

    Philbrick is magnificent. I recommend everything he’s written, whether I’ve read it or not.

    His son was in our briefly lived youth orchestra. I knew his parents very well. Wonderful family. A great writer. :-)

    • #23
  24. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    Before Obama’s house on the island, I was working on the well at Oak Bluffs. It required 3-4 trips with a two hour drive to get to the ferry in Falmouth at 6:30am. The first ferry trip is all workers. The rest of the day is all tourists.

    Sometimes the cell service was great, sometimes it was terrible. I complained to a local. He said that they always increase the power when a Kennedy is on the island then cut it down when they leave.

    Personally the cape and the islands are a terrible place to live. There are only two bridges to the cape. Once there all you have is expensive motels, soft-serv ice cream, and fried food. I need to be paid to go anywhere near there.

    I live here. I love it. :-) But I can certainly understand why others would not. :-) 

    • #24
  25. Chowderhead Coolidge
    Chowderhead
    @Podunk

    MarciN (View Comment):

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    Before Obama’s house on the island, I was working on the well at Oak Bluffs. It required 3-4 trips with a two hour drive to get to the ferry in Falmouth at 6:30am. The first ferry trip is all workers. The rest of the day is all tourists.

    Sometimes the cell service was great, sometimes it was terrible. I complained to a local. He said that they always increase the power when a Kennedy is on the island then cut it down when they leave.

    Personally the cape and the islands are a terrible place to live. There are only two bridges to the cape. Once there all you have is expensive motels, soft-serv ice cream, and fried food. I need to be paid to go anywhere near there.

    I live here. I love it. :-) But I can certainly understand why others would not. :-)

    It’s just not for me. I need tall trees and few people. Are you on the cape or the Vineyard? I now feel obligated to say something nice. Well I have to say, the marina in Harwich makes amazing truffle fries, and the seafood restaurant across from the ferry in Hyannis is really good too.   

    • #25
  26. MarciN Member
    MarciN
    @MarciN

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    MarciN (View Comment):

    Chowderhead (View Comment):

    Before Obama’s house on the island, I was working on the well at Oak Bluffs. It required 3-4 trips with a two hour drive to get to the ferry in Falmouth at 6:30am. The first ferry trip is all workers. The rest of the day is all tourists.

    Sometimes the cell service was great, sometimes it was terrible. I complained to a local. He said that they always increase the power when a Kennedy is on the island then cut it down when they leave.

    Personally the cape and the islands are a terrible place to live. There are only two bridges to the cape. Once there all you have is expensive motels, soft-serv ice cream, and fried food. I need to be paid to go anywhere near there.

    I live here. I love it. :-) But I can certainly understand why others would not. :-)

    It’s just not for me. I need tall trees and few people. Are you on the cape or the Vineyard? I now feel obligated to say something nice. Well I have to say, the marina in Harwich makes amazing truffle fries, and the seafood restaurant across from the ferry in Hyannis is really good too.

    The trees are short here. :-) There’s a long story as to why that is. :-) 

    I’m in the mid-Cape area, not on the islands. :-) 

    No worries. It isn’t for everyone. :-)

    • #26
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