This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Yuliya Tarasava, immigrant from Belarus and cofounder and chief operating officer at CNote, a platform that helps facilitate investment in financially underserved communities across America. In just six years, CNote has helped create or maintain more than 4,000 jobs in disadvantaged communities, invested more than 50 percent of capital into small businesses owned by Black, Indigenous and people of color (BIPOC), and invested more than 40 percent of capital into women-led small businesses, eight times the national average. Yuliya believes everybody deserves a chance at success, and dismantling the systemic barriers to such success is what she and her business are all about, as you’ll learn in this week’s JobMakers. 

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Uninterested in demographic indicators, I am perfectly capable of forgetting that Spain ever had anything to do with Texas. Sensitive however to trivia and flukes, I can be reminded! Thus it was when I glimpsed, in New Braunfels, a bowling alley whose name had “Mission” in it. Yep – time hung heavy for the padres, […]

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In this week’s episode of Parsing Immigration Policy, guest Phillip Linderman discusses the history of the Cuban migrant program and provides policy recommendations. Linderman, a retired State Department Foreign Service Officer, served in Trinidad, Chile, Cuba, and post-communist East Germany before returning to Washington, D.C. to work at the Organization of American States. During his time abroad, Linderman worked in the consular sector of the State Department, which was primarily charged with helping American citizens abroad and issuing visas and passports.

This week on Hubwonk, host Joe Selvaggi talks with Cicero Institute’s Jonathan Wolfson about the growing doctor shortage and the potential to alleviate the crisis by tapping the global supply of well-trained physicians eager to find safety and freedom in the US.

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Today on Parsing Immigration Policy, the Center responds to the argument by many supporters of high levels of immigration that an expansion of immigration would reduce inflation, which is close to a 40-year high. They argue that admitting more foreign workers to fill jobs would decrease wages and lower consumer prices. The Center’s analysis shows that the foreign workers would be filling jobs typically performed by the less-educated, such as food service, healthcare support, hospitality, and trucking. Reducing wages for the less-educated is not an effective means of controlling inflation because such workers earn relatively little and as a result account for only a modest share of economic output. Dr. Steven Camarota, the Center’s director of research, voices concern for the impact such a plan would have on the economic prospects of working-class Americans who have seen little to no wage growth for decades. Lowering wages for the lowest-paid workers will also impact taxpayers if these workers would then qualify for some of the country’s welfare programs. In his closing commentary, Mark Krikorian, the Center’s executive director and host of Parsing Immigration Policy, discusses Secretary Mayorkas’s appearance before the Senate Homeland Security Governmental Affairs Committee. While it lacked the drama of the House committee hearings, it revealed that the Biden administration is no longer trying to deter illegal migrants, making it the first administration to have such a policy.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Jackie Krick, immigrant from Colombia and founder, president and CEO of ECU Communications in Manassas, Virginia. They discuss the entrepreneurial spirit of the newest Americans – immigrants – and why they are twice as likely to start a business and create jobs. For Jackie, it took a few tries, but she learned the system, used available resources, and today, she runs a successful digital communications and cross-cultural services agency focused largely on federal contracts. She started an award-winning nonprofit called Impacto Youth to give underserved teens access to education and skills training. And she cofounded Centerfuse, a coworking space for microentrepreneurs to discover, learn, train and be mentored by successful business owners like her, as you’ll discover in this week’s JobMakers. 

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Amid record-breaking illegal migrant apprehensions at the Southwest border, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas faced two days of questioning last week at the House of Representatives. (He testified before the Senate this week.) His first day on Capitol Hill was focused on the FY2023 DHS budget, while his second appearance, the most contentious, was in front of the U.S. House Judiciary Committee, which is charged with the oversight of DHS.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Artur Sousa, immigrant from Brazil and founder and CEO of Adopets, an online platform that simplifies the work done by shelters and improves the pet adoption experience. Adopets has over 40,000 registered users and maintains more than 300,000 adoption listings. In this week’s JobMakers, Artur describes how opportunity, capitalism, circumstance and a rescue pup successfully aligned to fuel his social entrepreneurship success; though he is keenly aware that not every immigrant shares in the American Dream.

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Join Greg and Rob Long as they hope reports of major downsizing at public schools over shrinking enrollment means public schools will need to compete for students and provide a much better education. They also cringe as Biden official Samantha Power seems happy that farmers are getting crushed by much higher fertilizer prices because it will accelerate the government’s green agenda. And they shake their heads at the administration’s latest COVID hypocrisy at the border.

Join Jim and Greg as they cautiously welcome reports that Democrats not only worry about losing control of the U.S. Senate this year but fear even bigger losses in 2024. They also hammer DHS Sec. Alejandro Mayorkas for failing to secure our borders and his new idea of diverting medical personnel and money from the VA to deal with the human tide of illegal immigrants. And they’re even more unnerved by the idea of a Disinformation Governance Board and the the person chosen to run it.

Biden’s Failure to Stop Illegal Immigration Isn’t a ‘Mistake’

 

The invasion crisis on our southern border is baffling. How could this outrage be happening? The White House wants you to believe that they’re powerless to stop it. They’re willing to appear negligent and/or stupid to keep the wheels turning.

But there’s only one possible explanation that holds water: it’s a plan. And it’s working, as the border zone is flooded with millions of illegal immigrants, almost all of whom will stay permanently and lay the groundwork for an invincible voting bloc in the future.

If they sincerely wanted to do something about it, officials wouldn’t have to do any complicated thinking. Just stop egging on illegal immigrants to come and reinstate the Trump-era policies that were at least somewhat helpful.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Karina Calderon, deputy director of The Lawrence Partnership, about her work to help immigrant entrepreneurs drive economic growth in Lawrence, Massachusetts. The Lawrence Partnership is a collaboration of business and civic leaders started in 2015 that helps by incubating, training, assisting, loaning, basically doing everything they and their partners can to grow the city’s businesses. The model they’ve adopted is replicable for sure, and is one based on longstanding relationships and trust between new and longtime residents. Karina explains how it works, shares some of the success stories of their immigrant small business owners, and details her own immigration story, as you’ll learn in this week’s JobMakers.  

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Summary

Congress created an investment visa program, the EB-5 Program, in 1990 to stimulate the U.S. economy, specifically rural and depressed areas, through job creation and capital investment by foreign investors. The loopholes in the program, which sells a pathway to U.S. citizenship to wealthy foreigners and their families who invest in job-creation projects, quickly allowed the program to become riddled with fraud and to stray from what Congress envisioned. After an eight-month lapse, Congress has brought the program back to life through a provision in a funding bill – but it returns with many reforms.

George Fishman, the Center’s senior legal fellow and former DHS Deputy General Counsel, who was closely involved in EB-5 reform efforts, said, “These reforms bring to a close a seven-plus-year bi-partisan reform effort led by both the Democrat and Republican chairmen and ranking members of the House and Senate Judiciary Committees. Needed changes were blocked time and time again by big-moneyed industry interests which fought to keep their easy access to cheap capital through the EB-5 fraud riddled program.”

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Texas Governor Greg Abbott ordered “enhanced safety inspections” of commercial trucking coming off the international bridges from Mexico in response to the news that the Biden administration would be lifting the Title 42 pandemic-related orders, causing migrant numbers entering the United States to potentially surge to 18,000 a day. Texas Department of Public Safety inspectors disrupted international trade at America’s busiest commercial ports of entry, sending a clear message to Washington and Mexico that Texas demanded action to stop mass immigration across the Rio Grande.

Biden has not pushed Mexico to stop waving migrants from all over the world to the U.S. border, but Abbott now has and the results are in. The governors of all four Mexican states that border Texas have signed memorandums of understanding trading enhanced border security for the smooth flow of trucks across the border, upon which their economies depend.

Join Jim and Greg in breathing an unobstructed sigh of relief as U.S. District Judge Kathryn Kimball Mizelle finds the federal mask mandate for public transportation unconstitutional. They also cover the fallout from Washington Post tech reporter Taylor Lorenz trying to expose the operator of the Libs of TikTok Twitter page, despite publicly condemning online harassment aimed towards herself just weeks ago. And Texas gubernatorial candidate Beto O’Rourke changes his mind again on the Remain in Mexico policy, now saying it needs to end.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the news that the Moskva – the flagship of Russia’s Black Sea fleet – was sunk by missile strikes, even though the Russians won’t admit that part of the story. They’re also glad to see border agents vindicated over the false accusations from President Biden, DHS Sec. Mayorkas and others that they whipped Haitian migrants. And they discover another congressman who won’t go back to Washington – this one for at least a year-and-a-half.

 

Summary

A new report and podcast from the Center for Immigration Studies provides an overview of the Ukrainian refugee crisis, which has seen more than four million people flee Ukraine for neighboring countries. The report describes the European Union’s response to those seeking protection in various countries in the region and also highlights the U.S. response, which has been primarily aimed at providing economic and humanitarian assistance to enable Ukrainians to remain in their own region. However, President Biden, under pressure from refugee advocates, eventually committed to resettling 100,000 Ukrainians. The report provides a snapshot of the Ukrainian population already resettled in the U.S. which these individuals would be joining.

Most Ukrainians already resettled in the U.S. arrived under the “Lautenberg Amendment”, a Cold War-era program that gives priority to Ukrainians and others from the former Soviet Union who claim to be persecuted because of membership in a religious minority group. The program is on automatic pilot, being renewed yearly despite the fact that the Soviet Union no longer exists. It will undoubtedly be used to fast-track the resettlement of Ukrainians in the coming months despite the lack of religious persecution in the EU, where the Ukrainians are located.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Evan Silverio, child of immigrants from the Dominican Republic, President and CEO of Silverio Insurance Agency, and founder of Diverse Real Estate, both in Lawrence, Massachusetts. With the example set by his mother, who founded the agency, Evan has achieved success, despite getting into real estate during a housing bust. Evan has since purchased nearly 100 properties across the commonwealth. He describes the examples set by his immigrant mother and grandfather, and how that shaped not just his approach to business but also giving back to the community that nurtured him, as you’ll learn in this week’s JobMakers.

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Join Jim and Greg as they break down the latest polling on the Senate race in Nevada which has Republican Adam Laxalt ahead of incumbent Democrat Catherine Cortez Masto. They also shake their heads in response to news that Frank James, the suspect in the subway shooting in Brooklyn, was on the FBI’s radar as recently as 2019. This incident is only the latest in a string of cases where the perpetrator was known to the agency before they committed violent actions. And after two weeks, it is obvious that CNN+, CNN’s new premium streaming service, is a pathetic failure with an average viewership of only 10,000 viewers a day.

Join Greg and Rob Long as they welcome a bipartisan Senate effort to stop the Biden administration from scrapping Title 42, better known as the Remain in Mexico policy for illegal immigrants. They also unload on Press Secretary Jen Psaki for not knowing how much worse the border crisis will get if Title 42 goes away – and also not seeming to care. And they shake their heads as New York Gov. Kathy Hochul pushes for an end to natural gas in new buildings starting as early as 2027.