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It pleases me not to get too much information from the Internet. Or from Living Bird magazine. From the latter’s spring 2021 issue, I learned for the first time of the Indian vulture crisis. Seems these birds are near extinction, and given what’s lying around all over India, their absence is all too apparent. The […]

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I heard a bit of a radio story about a petition circulating in one of our N.C. cities to get the local government to clean up a large “homeless camp,” and wanted to find out more about it. That was rather unproductive but it led to finding another story on the origins of some of […]

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Immigrants have higher rates of entrepreneurship than the U.S.-born at 11.5% compared to 9%But there’s one group with even higher rates of business generation: refugees. Refugees have a 13% rate of entrepreneurship. They are good for our economy, but we also save lives by accepting them. There are at least 79.5 million people worldwide forced to flee their homes. For some perspective, that’s less than 1% of the world’s population, and yet last year the U.S. settled an astonishingly low 11,814 refugees. 

For Hong Tran of Worcester, Massachusetts, his early life in Vietnam and even the journey to seek safety in the U.S. was filled with tragedyHe was orphaned while fleeing and lost his baby sister to pirates in the ocean. Thankfully, the U.S. gave him and his remaining family refuge, and they have given backThey have excelled at entrepreneurship, with his aunt and uncle launching three businesses while he grew up, and today Hong has a diner, a laundromat, a liquor store, a real estate company, and a law firm under his belt, creating more than 50 jobs in the process. Hong knows what it’s like to have nothing. Even with the rise in anti-Asian bigotry, he is determined to use his influence to help other immigrants and refugees get a leg up in their new homeland

Biden’s Border Crisis Shows No Signs of Letting Up

 

America has a border wall that is very efficient at keeping out intruders. It hasn’t been breached once in over three months.

Unfortunately, it protects only our political elites at the US Capitol, who are under minimal threat. Other Americans must make do with a wall that is highly porous, that leaks multitudes of illegal immigrants daily, including everything from petty criminals making life miserable for border residents to murderous cartel members.

Americans not living in a cave know we have a hot mess on our southern border. Fired up by Biden‘s not-so-subtle invitation to come in, hordes of migrants began forming caravans even before his inauguration.

This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Sandro Catanzaro, who started several businesses in his native Peru but had no idea he’d end up helping NASA go to Mars, or that he’d use that same technology to plan and buy video ad campaigns. Now Head of Publisher Services Strategy for Roku, which acquired the company he founded, dataxu, in 2019, Mr. Catanzaro is an emblem of ingenuity and inventiveness. His demand-side platform, device graph technology and analytics platform help accelerate Roku’s ad tech roadmap and ability to serve a wide array of advertisers. But he’s not done yet!

Guest:

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To what can the current massive human trafficking, aided and abetted by America, by the Biden administration, be compared?   I would say the most apt, though not precise, comparison, would be to the Slave Trade. The difference of course would be that Slaves were brought forcibly; the humans trafficked to America now are enticed. […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the Biden administration’s grudging concession that there needs to be upgrades to our physical barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border. They also groan as the Senate parliamentarian, as expected, will allow the Democrats to pursue one more bill by a simple majority during this fiscal year. That means the $2 trillion “infrastructure” bill can become law without a single GOP vote in Congress. And they get a kick out of President Biden trying to pretend he wasn’t a major catalyst in getting the all-star game moved out of Atlanta.

Join Greg and Chad Benson as they cheer a very good March jobs report, showing more 900,000 new jobs added last month. They also wade through the sordid allegations emerging against Florida GOP Rep. Matt Gaetz and his counter-allegations that he the victim of an extortion attempt. And they react very strongly to Dr. Leanna Wen saying states should not open up yet because opening up should be conditional upon people getting vaccinated. She says, “Otherwise, people are going to go out and enjoy these freedoms anyway.”

Therapeutic Foster Parents Evicted in Renton, WA, to House Migrants

 

To make their rented home available, therapeutic foster parents were evicted to house Illegal Migrant Children.  Now, there is an eviction moratorium for people “affected by the Wuhan Coronavirus.” No mention of that moratorium applying to this Hispanic couple who have raised many foster children with special needs. And despite the fact that up to 10% of those Illegal Migrant Children test positive for said Wuhan Coronavirus.

The house is owned by the Friends of Youth, a nonprofit in the Seattle area that serves young people. This eviction is wrong in so many ways, including the fact that the family has already had one of its foster kids run away from home due to the eviction notice that was received in January. The kids the couple are fostering already have many strikes against them, and this will make things much worse.  The real estate market in the Seattle area is very hot, with prices and rents skyrocketing, so the parents will have a very hard time finding new lodging that will be suitable for their family.

Immigrants and refugees are a net economic benefit to host countries like the United States. Research has consistently shown they help create jobs and add an important dynamism to our economy. This is the case even when there is initial investment on behalf of the state, through education, English classes or welfare. Immigrants pay more into the system than they get out.  For Christina Qi, who started a hedge fund at just 22, the welfare she was on in her early years in Utah after moving from China helped stabilize her youth and pave the way for her to attend MIT. She went on to co-found Domeyard, a quantitative trading firm, in 2013, among the longest running high-frequency trading hedge funds in the world, and was trading up to $7 billion dollars a day. In 2019, she founded Databento, an on-demand data platform for asset managers and quantitative analysts. Being an immigrant, Asian and a woman in the cutthroat, male-dominated world of Wall Street didn’t deter her. Nor did she forget those who helped get her to where she is today. As you’ll soon learn in this week’s JobMakers podcast.

Guest

Rob Long is in for Jim today. Rob and Greg react to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo doing exactly what Rob said he would do to distract from his many scandals. Then they’re glad to see President Biden’s poll numbers sinking on immigration policy. They also explain how Biden’s “infrastructure” bill appears to include a bunch of Green New Deal provisions, guts freedom to work. And they call out the left’s refusal to acknowledge basic biological reality when it comes to determining a person’s sex.

Join Jim and Greg as they react to former CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield believing that the COVID outbreak probably started with a lab leak in Wuhan. They also discuss Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey saying President Biden is obviously not taking the border crisis seriously when he appoints someone like Vice President Kamala Harris to focus on the problem. And they point out all the ways Biden is nothing more than an opportunistic hypocrite when he now agrees that the Senate filibuster is a “Jim Crow relic.”

Welcome to JobMakers, a new, weekly podcast, produced by Pioneer Institute and The Immigrant Learning Center. Host Denzil Mohammed explores the world of risk-taking immigrants, who create new products, services and jobs in New England and across the United States.

In the debut episode, Denzil talks with Herby Duverné, CEO at Windwalker Group, an award-winning small business with more than 25 years of experience in physical and cybersecurity solutions that protect and prepare companies through custom learning and training solutions. Herby shares his background as a Haitian immigrant, and some of the challenges of moving to America, working through college to support his family, and embarking on a career path. They discuss what inspired him to start his own business, how he prepared for success, lessons he has learned along the way, and how he gives back.

In today’s edition:

• Nancy Pelosi is trying to steal Rep. Marianette Miller-Meeks’ seat

Join Jim and Greg as they enjoy watching California Gov. Gavin Newsom admit there will likely be a tough recall campaign against him on the ballot soon.  They also hammer the Biden administration for refusing to allow border security personnel to speak to the media and demanding the press send all inquiries to Washington. And they unload on unserious Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse for alleging the FBI faked its investigation into Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Join Jim and Greg as they marvel at some Democrats conveniently worrying about our massive debt just one day after passing a bloated COVID relief bill totaling $1.9 trillion and eyeing an even more expensive bill in a couple of months. They also discuss the sixth allegation of sexual harassment against New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and when state Democrats will move from muttering things about resignation to an actual impeachment effort. And they discuss the mess at the southern border thanks to Biden’s deportation moratorium and stated plans of a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants.

Since the beginning of the COVID pandemic, we’ve heard a lot about anti-Asian racism. From New York to San Francisco, there have been reports of slurs, taunts, and violence. Recently, several horrific attacks committed by young black men against the elderly have caught national attention.

Numerous Asian American activists and political leaders have blamed former President Trump, noting that his use of the terms “Kung Flu,” “China virus” or “Chinese virus” has led to the increase in racism and violence.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Gerard and Cara talk with Loung Ung, a human-rights activist; the author of the bestselling books First They Killed My Father: A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers, Lucky Child, and Lulu in the Sky; and a co-screenwriter of the 2017 Netflix Original Movie, First They Killed My Father. Ms. Ung shares her experiences living through genocide under Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge from 1975 to 1979, which resulted in the deaths of nearly a quarter of Cambodia’s population. Loung talks about the experience of working with Angelina Jolie on the film version of First They Killed My Father, and the role that documentaries like hers and the award-winning 1984 film, The Killing Fields, can play in portraying the human stories behind historic events. They explore Ms. Ung’s life in America, and the support she received from her secondary school teachers in Essex Junction, Vermont, her professors at St. Michael’s College, and from local and religious institutions. The episode concludes with a reading from Loung Ung’s memoir.

Stories of the Week: A new poll shows that nearly a third of parents may continue with remote learning after COVID. According to a new report, only one in six Indiana college students who study education actually join the teaching profession. How can we remove barriers to entry, especially among people of color?

Member Post

 

Just recently, there was a horrible accident near San Diego, CA, where an SUV crashed into a semi-truck carrying gravel.  That SUV was carrying 25 people.  Thirteen of them were killed.  The SUV was a Ford Expedition, which I believe should carry a maximum of 8-9 people.  The California Highway Patrol is being very cagey […]

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Immigration: Getting It Right

 

Earlier this year, the Biden administration issued a “Fact Sheet” on his proposed US Citizenship Act, a comprehensive plan to expand pathways to citizenship and otherwise modernize and liberalize this nation’s immigration system. It is very difficult to draw categorical conclusions about the many facets of immigration law. The passion on both sides of this issue suggests that finding a sensible middle position may be impossible. Even so, a measured and compromising approach is the best way forward on immigration reform, with its complex highways and byways.

One way to think about immigration reform is to compare the case for free and open immigration with the parallel case for free trade. Fierce opposition to free trade in part propelled Donald Trump to his 2016 presidential victory. Free trade did not take a central role in the 2020 election, in large part because candidate Biden offered a similar sentiment to bolster trade union support. This was not merely campaign talk. President Biden recently issued a protective “Buy American” statement, the objective of which is “to support manufacturers, businesses, and workers to ensure that our future is made in all of America by all of America’s workers.” A Biden executive order from January seeks to “use terms and conditions of federal financial assistance awards and federal procurements to maximize the use of goods, products, and materials produced in, and services offered in, the United States.”

But the effort to turn the United States inward on matters of economic activity will force superior foreign products to be substituted with inferior domestic ones, making domestic production less efficient. These inefficiencies will have far-reaching consequences: raising prices and lowering wages across the board, weakening American exports, and inducing other nations to take retaliatory measures, which will further contract world trade. Hopefully, the world economy can avoid a repeat of the implosion of international trade that followed the passage of the 1930 Smoot-Hawley tariff. But the political risk still remains.