On Doctors and Following the Science

 

Earlier this week, I reached a bit of a breaking point with COVID theatre in medical settings. We brought our two-year-old daughter to a specialist appointment for a somewhat stressful (though non-invasive) test. I brought my husband Seth along because I didn’t want to be faced with the possibility of having to juggle a crying newborn while also comforting my scared toddler during the exam.

It started with the pens. The pens, oh, the pens. There is something deeply disconcerting about a medical provider that is still engaging in the theatre surrounding surface transmission in late-July of 2021. No, we don’t need separate cups of “clean” and “dirty” pens. I intentionally always take one out of the dirty cup in my own quiet little act of rebellion.

But then her name was called, and we all started walking back into the exam room before the nurse stopped us. “We only allow one parent into the room at a time.”

Let’s just pretend for a moment that we all had COVID. We are all of the same household. If one of us has it, all of us have it. But the point is moot because every single adult in the room is presumably vaccinated (me and my husband have and could have proved it upon request). If we all trust the vaccine (I do, and I have real questions if my medical provider doesn’t), why can’t three masked and vaccinated adults be in the same room together?

There are any number of reasons why both parents might want to be in the room; for me, if I’m being honest, I’m a control freak. I know my husband is capable of comforting our daughter, but I wanted to watch the exam to make sure it was done correctly and ask questions along the way. When Seth came out of the room I asked him what happened. “I don’t know, they told me to come back to the waiting room.” Zero information. That’s men, or at least, that’s my man. I’m chatty while I pump for information; he played Baby Shark on his phone for the toddler and did little else, he focused on her and her anxiety and needs. Seth’s grandmother always used to say that good couples are like “pots and tops,” every pot has a top; they aren’t identical but complementary. When we both go to appointments (rarely, but when they’re important we make it happen) we utilize this pots and tops dynamic. We fill different roles; he’s the comforting and entertaining parent, and I’m the parent who makes sure we never leave without every avenue pursued, every question answered.

On Twitter yesterday, I saw another mother express similar frustration with her medical provider over allowing misplaced COVID fears allow essential care to be sidelined.

What are we doing? Why would a vaccinated medical provider fear a sick child? Isn’t treating children, both sick and well, part of their essential job description? We’ve allowed so much medicine to go unpracticed for the last year and a half. We’ve allowed children’s health to suffer in order to appease irrational fears of adults, the adults we trust(ed) to provide them with healthcare. When I was asked to stay in the waiting room I was told, “We feel more comfortable if only one parent comes in.” Why are we allowing the feelings of adults to stand in the way of them doing their jobs, especially when their jobs are taking care of kids?

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  1. Lois Lane Coolidge
    Lois Lane
    @LoisLane

    I’m with you, Bethany.  I had to take my husband for a basic procedure last week, and a lot of this  continued hyper vigilance felt… well… stupid.  We are also both vaccinated.  I’ve had pneumonia three times and don’t remember anyone at the hospitals being overly concerned about masks.  And I was very, very sick each time.   

    • #1
  2. JennaStocker Member
    JennaStocker
    @JennaStocker

    An “abundance of caution” has turned into “indulging the irrational.” As long as we cater to people’s unreasonable and unrealistic fears without using facts and data to combat it, we will never get through this.

    • #2
  3. Rodin Member
    Rodin
    @Rodin

    Wow!, just wow! Many Americans have been red-pilled over the last 15 months. So many institutions have lost the trust and respect they had heretofore. My family is a medical family and I have seen the shift from individual practice to corporate medicine, individual judgment to insurer- and government-directed processes. Medical training and self-selected entry to the field has changed along with these other evolutions. My father and father-in-law always practiced in the old way. My brother and my cousin adapted to the changes. (My brother-in-law probably wouldn’t have adapted but died too young to know for sure.) My nieces and nephews seem to have adapted very nicely. “Professional” independence and respect has diminished. “Hive” training is all the rage. 

    • #3
  4. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    Rodin (View Comment):

    Wow!, just wow! Many Americans have been red-pilled over the last 15 months. So many institutions have lost the trust and respect they had heretofore. My family is a medical family and I have seen the shift from individual practice to corporate medicine, individual judgment to insurer- and government-directed processes. Medical training and self-selected entry to the field has changed along with these other evolutions. My father and father-in-law always practiced in the old way. My brother and my cousin adapted to the changes. (My brother-in-law probably wouldn’t have adapted but died too young to know for sure.) My nieces and nephews seem to have adapted very nicely. “Professional” independence and respect has diminished. “Hive” training is all the rage.

    The employee nickname for the administration building on our campus is “The Hive.”  

    • #4
  5. Eugene Kriegsmann Member
    Eugene Kriegsmann
    @EugeneKriegsmann

    The problem would seem to be that they are all method actors who have gotten so far into their roles that they have forgotten that they are acting. We merrily go from the sublime to the ridiculous.

    • #5
  6. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    Did they clean the door knobs every time they were used? Did they require you to wear booties over your shoes? 

    • #6
  7. The Cynthonian Member
    The Cynthonian
    @TheCynthonian

    Rodin (View Comment):

    Wow!, just wow! Many Americans have been red-pilled over the last 15 months. So many institutions have lost the trust and respect they had heretofore. My family is a medical family and I have seen the shift from individual practice to corporate medicine, individual judgment to insurer- and government-directed processes. Medical training and self-selected entry to the field has changed along with these other evolutions. My father and father-in-law always practiced in the old way. My brother and my cousin adapted to the changes. (My brother-in-law probably wouldn’t have adapted but died too young to know for sure.) My nieces and nephews seem to have adapted very nicely. “Professional” independence and respect has diminished. “Hive” training is all the rage.

    The older ones who remember how it used to be chafe under this way of practicing medicine.

    • #7
  8. Seawriter Contributor
    Seawriter
    @Seawriter

    The last year has reduced my tolerance for horse pucky tremendously. I am not going to comply with irrational demands. Instead I plan to ask them if they are superstitious. Because that is what this is, superstition.

    • #8
  9. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    Many people have complained that the reaction to Covid, with lockdowns and closed businesses, has caused a massive transfer of wealth. 

    Worse, I think it’s also caused a massive transfer of health.  The young have been forced to sacrifice so much for the old. As the oldest person in my family, I am furious. 

    • #9
  10. Dr. Craniotomy Coolidge
    Dr. Craniotomy
    @Craniotomy

    Our hospital is just as bad. We won’t allow families to visit dying loved ones (even for non-covid causes). 

    Unfortunately I have end-of-life conversations multiple times a week. It’s usually from trauma, so always a shock to the family. After speaking to the family, the worst part about the whole experience is asking them to choose the two people who can go see the patient. Nobody else can come say goodbye. It’s grotesque. 

    • #10
  11. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    Bethany Mandel: There are any number of reasons why both parents might want to be in the room; for me, if I’m being honest, I’m a control freak. I know my husband is capable of comforting our daughter, but I wanted to watch the exam to make sure it was done correctly and ask questions along the way. When Seth came out of the room I asked him what happened. “I don’t know, they told me to come back to the waiting room.” Zero information. That’s men, or at least, that’s my man.

    Two parent households work well because the parents are different, and offer different strengths and benefits. 

    Not child oriented, but there are reasons to have more than one person in a medical appointment.

    The female co-host of a talk radio program I listen to inadvertently started a topic that kept going for days on the program when she mentioned that she goes with her husband to her husband’s significant medical appointments (and she is currently prevented from doing so). The male co-host couldn’t believe it. (So that provided the hosts with enough emails and listener call-ins to make for entertaining talk radio.) 

    Anyway, the female co-host said she hears completely different things than her husband does, and she asks the doctor very different questions than her husband does. In their case, he just wants to know what he should do (action response), and isn’t much interested in the why’s and wherefore’s. She wants to know more background and process information. 

    My wife and I don’t work this way, but I understand couples and parents who do.

    Permitting only the patient, only one parent of the patient into the room may limit the family understanding of the issue, and thus may limit the ability to provide care after the appointment.

    • #11
  12. Lois Lane Coolidge
    Lois Lane
    @LoisLane

    Dr. Craniotomy (View Comment):

    Our hospital is just as bad. We won’t allow families to visit dying loved ones (even for non-covid causes).

    Unfortunately I have end-of-life conversations multiple times a week. It’s usually from trauma, so always a shock to the family. After speaking to the family, the worst part about the whole experience is asking them to choose the two people who can go see the patient. Nobody else can come say goodbye. It’s grotesque.

    I can’t “like” the comment.  I agree with “grotesque.”

    • #12
  13. Ed G. Member
    Ed G.
    @EdG

    Medical facilities live on protocols. Some protocols are professional standards, some regulatory, others insurer-required. Most of that is reasonable most of the time. However, people who should be more grounded have lost their ever loving minds over covid. My doctor recently was encouraging me to get vaccinated. I said I’m not opposed conceptually, but I’d like the long term analysis of the vaccines to be completed first. I could afford to wait for that because I’m not in a high risk category and any high-riskers I come into contact with are already vaccinated. His response/reaction was to insist that we have plenty of data and testing; I reiterated that I was referring to the long term effects and he just reiterated that we already have all the testing and data we need. For a vaccine authorized only as emergence use that’s existed for less than (at that time) six months. He continued on as if I were anti vaccine generally and as if he’d never heard of this strange anti-science thing called long term affects and long term analysis. My doctor was reacting this way.

    How can I ever trust his judgement again? He could have acknowledged my point and made the case that I should get vaccinated anyway because even with those risks the more prudent course was to be vaccinated. I would have disagreed still, but I would have respected that .

    My wife’s obgyn, on the other hand, is grounded and has been so since before covid. He questions things, fields questions, and acknowledges the unknowns and gray areas; he acknowledges when something is more a matter of personal preference than dictated by the science. I wish he were a general practitioner. Maybe I can start identifying as a woman just so I can get some sound medical advice from a based doctor.

    • #13
  14. EJHill Podcaster
    EJHill
    @EJHill

    “Follow the science” might as well be “follow the Torah” or “follow the Koran” or whatever the religious scripture of your choice.

    I respect practicing doctors. But they are not really all that different from the rest of us in that their ranks are populated with the same ratio of greatness, near competence and marginal nut cases. The medical profession has given us Jonas Salk, Arthur Conan Doyle and Joseph Mengele. They have produced life saving breakthroughs and unspeakable horrors. They are not gods.  

    • #14
  15. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):

    Bethany Mandel: There are any number of reasons why both parents might want to be in the room; for me, if I’m being honest, I’m a control freak. I know my husband is capable of comforting our daughter, but I wanted to watch the exam to make sure it was done correctly and ask questions along the way. When Seth came out of the room I asked him what happened. “I don’t know, they told me to come back to the waiting room.” Zero information. That’s men, or at least, that’s my man.

    Two parent households work well because the parents are different, and offer different strengths and benefits.

    Not child oriented, but there are reasons to have more than one person in a medical appointment.

    The female co-host of a talk radio program I listen to inadvertently started a topic that kept going for days on the program when she mentioned that she goes with her husband to her husband’s significant medical appointments (and she is currently prevented from doing so). The male co-host couldn’t believe it. (So that provided the hosts with enough emails and listener call-ins to make for entertaining talk radio.)

    Anyway, the female co-host said she hears completely different things than her husband does, and she asks the doctor very different questions than her husband does. In their case, he just wants to know what he should do (action response), and isn’t much interested in the why’s and wherefore’s. She wants to know more background and process information.

    My wife and I don’t work this way, but I understand couples and parents who do.

    Permitting only the patient, only one parent of the patient into the room may limit the family understanding of the issue, and thus may limit the ability to provide care after the appointment.

    And I have become so cynical that I wonder if many doctors don’t consider limiting the amount of people who question them a benefit. 

    On a somewhat related note, I had an experience where an ER nurse threatened my then three year daughter with making me leave the room. Daughter and son #3 had a tea party that included Flintstone vitamins with Iron. I took them to the ER, when daughter refused to drink something creepy from a stranger, the nurse said : you drink this right now or I ’m making your mommy leave. 

    I moved in front of her and said to daughter: how many barbies is this going to cost?

    Still pisses me off. Daughter remembers it, and thought I was a bad ass ever since. Also remembers the sleepy time Barbie she got on the way home. 

    • #15
  16. Eugene Kriegsmann Member
    Eugene Kriegsmann
    @EugeneKriegsmann

     I remember very well many years ago when my wife, then a tenured professor in speech pathology at U of Washington, was unable to convince a nurse who was acting as screen for the ENT doctor that our son should be seen for an appointment to determine if he needed tubes in his ears to relieve his hearing loss due to an infection. When I called, I was put through to the doctor immediately and surgery took place the next day. Women are the worst abusers of other women when they hold positions of authority, particularly in the medical profession. I did not possess even the most minor modicum of knowledge that my wife did, but my maleness carried much more authority with a nurse screener.

    • #16
  17. Gazpacho Grande' Coolidge
    Gazpacho Grande'
    @ChrisCampion

    Eugene Kriegsmann (View Comment):

    I remember very well many years ago when my wife, then a tenured professor in speech pathology at U of Washington, was unable to convince a nurse who was acting as screen for the ENT doctor that our son should be seen for an appointment to determine if he needed tubes in his ears to relieve his hearing loss due to an infection. When I called, I was put through to the doctor immediately and surgery took place the next day. Women are the worst abusers of other women when they hold positions of authority, particularly in the medical profession. I did not possess even the most minor modicum of knowledge that my wife did, but my maleness carried much more authority with a nurse screener.

    Height and stature go a long way.

    Let’s use the old ways.

     

    • #17
  18. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    I went to a new dentist last week (new insurance with a new set of cooperative dentists) who had the silly “clean pens” “dirty pens” cups on the counter, but pretty much everybody seemed to be ignoring the differentiation. Most of the patients (and their relatives) in the waiting room were not wearing masks. The dentists and staff were generally not wearing masks except when hovering or working over patients. But dentists, their assistants, and dental hygienists have been wearing masks since long before Covid, so that’s OK with me. 

    • #18
  19. DaveSchmidt Coolidge
    DaveSchmidt
    @DaveSchmidt

    Eugene Kriegsmann (View Comment):

    I remember very well many years ago when my wife, then a tenured professor in speech pathology at U of Washington, was unable to convince a nurse who was acting as screen for the ENT doctor that our son should be seen for an appointment to determine if he needed tubes in his ears to relieve his hearing loss due to an infection. When I called, I was put through to the doctor immediately and surgery took place the next day. Women are the worst abusers of other women when they hold positions of authority, particularly in the medical profession. I did not possess even the most minor modicum of knowledge that my wife did, but my maleness carried much more authority with a nurse screener.

    That was, as you say, many years ago.  The current herd of CRT expert consultants (the majority of them women) are more than willing to stampede over anyone who hesitates to accept their authority. 

    • #19
  20. Full Size Tabby Member
    Full Size Tabby
    @FullSizeTabby

    When I had my knee replaced ten years ago, my wife did not accompany me to the doctor’s appointments, but we were really glad she was with me at the hospital’s group pre-operative session on “what to expect.” I heard all the instructions about what I should expect, but I heard very little of the discussions about care-giving. My wife heard all the information about care-giving. So between us we got more information than either of us alone would have. (That hospital performed a lot of joint replacements – more than 25% of the hospital’s patient rooms were dedicated to joint replacement recovery patients, mostly hips and knees.)

    • #20
  21. James Salerno Coolidge
    James Salerno
    @JamesSalerno

    The pens! These people do realize that when you write your name down with your CLEAN pen, you are still resting your hand on the same DIRTY notepad that everyone else has been writing on?

    When I went to the dentist a few months ago, they only conducted my x-rays and exam. I had to schedule a separate cleaning because “something, something Covid.”

    Something, something Covid has become an all-purpose excuse for just about any type of idiocy.

    • #21
  22. Columbo Member
    Columbo
    @Columbo

    EJHill (View Comment):

    “Follow the science” might as well be “follow the Torah” or “follow the Koran” or whatever the religious scripture of your choice.

    I respect practicing doctors. But they are not really all that different from the rest of us in that their ranks are populated with the same ratio of greatness, near competence and marginal nut cases. The medical profession has given us Jonas Salk, Arthur Conan Doyle and Joseph Mengele. They have produced life saving breakthroughs and unspeakable horrors. They are not gods.

    AND, they are very scared of the current “God’s” in medicine. Namely malpractice insurance companies.

    • #22
  23. Nanocelt TheContrarian Member
    Nanocelt TheContrarian
    @NanoceltTheContrarian

    And, just as a reminder:  It is very difficult for small children to get, or transmit, COVID. Why?  For the virus to enter cells (and do its thing) it needs an activated Androgen receptor in the cell cytoplasm of the child. An activated androgen receptor is one that has Testosterone or Dihydrotestosterone attached to it. Prepubertal children have virtually none of these activated androgen receptors. Hence their failure to acquire or transmit COVID. So all of this hullabaloo in a pediatrician’s office for a preschooler is beyond preposterous.

    Fear of COVID in small children, or the vaccinated adults accompanying them, that results in a delay in essential vaccines for the child (while at the same time “experts” are advising COVID vaccines for small children, that are both useless for the child and useless for the adults around them) is malpractice. Bethany is not just right: She is right on a cosmic scale. She is arguing that the earth is a small planet orbiting a small sun on the periphery of the Milky Way galaxy, while the pediatrician is insisting that the earth is stationary at the center of the universe. I can hear her muttering under her breath as she leaves the pediatricians office:  Eppur si moeve

    For a more detailed description:   The activated androgen receptor enters the nucleus of the host cell and induces DNA transcription, including of a membrane bound serine protease called TMPRSS2, that attaches to the cell membrane (thus in proximity to the ACE2 receptor) and lyses the Spike protein at serine amino acid residues when it is bound to the ACE2 receptor (Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 receptor). This cleavage of the Spike protein allows the viral membrane to merge with the cell membrane allowing viral entry into the cell. This is called “Priming” of the S (Spike) protein. 

    Why are children more resistant to SARS-CoV-2 infection?

    • #23
  24. The Reticulator Member
    The Reticulator
    @TheReticulator

    Bethany Mandel: When I was asked to stay in the waiting room I was told, “We feel more comfortable if only one parent comes in.”

     All the more reason for both parents to go in. 

    • #24
  25. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    The Reticulator (View Comment):

    Bethany Mandel: When I was asked to stay in the waiting room I was told, “We feel more comfortable if only one parent comes in.”

    All the more reason for both parents to go in.

    I think my response would have been “We are here for our (child’s) comfort, not yours.”  And if they don’t understand the sense of that, leave.

    • #25
  26. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Annefy (View Comment):

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):

    Bethany Mandel: There are any number of reasons why both parents might want to be in the room; for me, if I’m being honest, I’m a control freak. I know my husband is capable of comforting our daughter, but I wanted to watch the exam to make sure it was done correctly and ask questions along the way. When Seth came out of the room I asked him what happened. “I don’t know, they told me to come back to the waiting room.” Zero information. That’s men, or at least, that’s my man.

    Two parent households work well because the parents are different, and offer different strengths and benefits.

    Not child oriented, but there are reasons to have more than one person in a medical appointment.

    The female co-host of a talk radio program I listen to inadvertently started a topic that kept going for days on the program when she mentioned that she goes with her husband to her husband’s significant medical appointments (and she is currently prevented from doing so). The male co-host couldn’t believe it. (So that provided the hosts with enough emails and listener call-ins to make for entertaining talk radio.)

    Anyway, the female co-host said she hears completely different things than her husband does, and she asks the doctor very different questions than her husband does. In their case, he just wants to know what he should do (action response), and isn’t much interested in the why’s and wherefore’s. She wants to know more background and process information.

    My wife and I don’t work this way, but I understand couples and parents who do.

    Permitting only the patient, only one parent of the patient into the room may limit the family understanding of the issue, and thus may limit the ability to provide care after the appointment.

    And I have become so cynical that I wonder if many doctors don’t consider limiting the amount of people who question them a benefit.

    On a somewhat related note, I had an experience where an ER nurse threatened my then three year daughter with making me leave the room. Daughter and son #3 had a tea party that included Flintstone vitamins with Iron. I took them to the ER, when daughter refused to drink something creepy from a stranger, the nurse said : you drink this right now or I ’m making your mommy leave.

    I moved in front of her and said to daughter: how many barbies is this going to cost?

    Still pisses me off. Daughter remembers it, and thought I was a bad ass ever since. Also remembers the sleepy time Barbie she got on the way home.

    It seems to be more and more necessary to record every interaction with any kind of “authority.”  I think I would have demanded the nurse’s supervisor be brought in, and replay the recording.

    • #26
  27. Annefy Member
    Annefy
    @Annefy

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):

    Bethany Mandel: There are any number of reasons why both parents might want to be in the room; for me, if I’m being honest, I’m a control freak. I know my husband is capable of comforting our daughter, but I wanted to watch the exam to make sure it was done correctly and ask questions along the way. When Seth came out of the room I asked him what happened. “I don’t know, they told me to come back to the waiting room.” Zero information. That’s men, or at least, that’s my man.

    Two parent households work well because the parents are different, and offer different strengths and benefits.

    snip

    Anyway, the female co-host said she hears completely different things than her husband does, and she asks the doctor very different questions than her husband does. In their case, he just wants to know what he should do (action response), and isn’t much interested in the why’s and wherefore’s. She wants to know more background and process information.

    My wife and I don’t work this way, but I understand couples and parents who do.

    Permitting only the patient, only one parent of the patient into the room may limit the family understanding of the issue, and thus may limit the ability to provide care after the appointment.

    And I have become so cynical that I wonder if many doctors don’t consider limiting the amount of people who question them a benefit.

    On a somewhat related note, I had an experience where an ER nurse threatened my then three year daughter with making me leave the room. Daughter and son #3 had a tea party that included Flintstone vitamins with Iron. I took them to the ER, when daughter refused to drink something creepy from a stranger, the nurse said : you drink this right now or I ’m making your mommy leave.

    I moved in front of her and said to daughter: how many barbies is this going to cost?

    Still pisses me off. Daughter remembers it, and thought I was a bad ass ever since. Also remembers the sleepy time Barbie she got on the way home.

    It seems to be more and more necessary to record every interaction with any kind of “authority.” I think I would have demanded the nurse’s supervisor be brought in, and replay the recording.

    And my experience was 27 years ago. Pales compared to what daughter has experienced now that she’s a mom. She had to get her daughter #2 to a dentist right after she was born … with teeth. Ended up at a Medical mill. She heard moms threatened with CPS if they missed a dentist appointment. And another mom being bulled into getting her little one’s eight (?) cavities taken care of that day.

     

    • #27
  28. kedavis Member
    kedavis
    @kedavis

    Annefy (View Comment):

    kedavis (View Comment):

    Annefy (View Comment):

    Full Size Tabby (View Comment):

    Bethany Mandel: There are any number of reasons why both parents might want to be in the room; for me, if I’m being honest, I’m a control freak. I know my husband is capable of comforting our daughter, but I wanted to watch the exam to make sure it was done correctly and ask questions along the way. When Seth came out of the room I asked him what happened. “I don’t know, they told me to come back to the waiting room.” Zero information. That’s men, or at least, that’s my man.

    Two parent households work well because the parents are different, and offer different strengths and benefits.

    snip

    Anyway, the female co-host said she hears completely different things than her husband does, and she asks the doctor very different questions than her husband does. In their case, he just wants to know what he should do (action response), and isn’t much interested in the why’s and wherefore’s. She wants to know more background and process information.

    My wife and I don’t work this way, but I understand couples and parents who do.

    Permitting only the patient, only one parent of the patient into the room may limit the family understanding of the issue, and thus may limit the ability to provide care after the appointment.

    And I have become so cynical that I wonder if many doctors don’t consider limiting the amount of people who question them a benefit.

    On a somewhat related note, I had an experience where an ER nurse threatened my then three year daughter with making me leave the room. Daughter and son #3 had a tea party that included Flintstone vitamins with Iron. I took them to the ER, when daughter refused to drink something creepy from a stranger, the nurse said : you drink this right now or I ’m making your mommy leave.

    I moved in front of her and said to daughter: how many barbies is this going to cost?

    Still pisses me off. Daughter remembers it, and thought I was a bad ass ever since. Also remembers the sleepy time Barbie she got on the way home.

    It seems to be more and more necessary to record every interaction with any kind of “authority.” I think I would have demanded the nurse’s supervisor be brought in, and replay the recording.

    And my experience was 27 years ago. Pales compared to what daughter has experienced now that she’s a mom. She had to get her daughter #2 to a dentist right after she was born … with teeth. Ended up at a Medical mill. She heard moms threatened with CPS if they missed a dentist appointment. And another mom being bulled into getting her little one’s eight (?) cavities taken care of that day.

     

    Sounds like a good reason to use an alias at first.

    • #28
  29. CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill Coolidge
    CarolJoy, Not So Easy To Kill
    @CarolJoy

    You think taking a “dirty” pen is an act of rebellion?
    But yet you got vaxxed.

     A real act of rebellion takes insight, information, knowledge.

    And I guess it follows, because the populace as a whole was told last year that to prevent the killer spread of this dread disease, that we should agree to be be locked down, masked up and non-socially distancing. (We shall ignore for the moment the lie that it is a killer disease. For people under the age of 40 and in good health, the stats by Ioannadis & Royal Medicine of The Netherlands show a perky 99.000053% survival rate.)

     Oh and just for two weeks!

    But two weeks became months. By November, lo and behold, we were told that we could leave behind the lockdowns and the masking up and the social distancing if we would just get vaxxed.

    So now people have gotten vaxxed, and lo and behold, there are variants.

    So now the vaxxed still must wear masks and still must face lockdowns, as is expected to occur in five Dem held states by August 9th.

    Why the variants?

    One explanation:
     Coronavirus variant has escaped the ability of the  current vaccines and thus is more likely to evolve in a vaccinated host.

    Why?
    That’s because the vax also has a function of gain on the victim. Common problems with mRNA shots are that the factors from the vaccines that are already evident in cases of  thrombosis, myocarditis etc, all can take different pathways and then target different physiological systems depending on idiosyncracies of the victim. Some individuals will get Myocarditis or Thrombosis but other individuals  will get other adverse effects. And in time??

    Dr Charles Hoffe has predicted that some individuals  with anomalies resulting from the interaction of blood and the spike proteins  lining the walls of the veins arteries and capillaries in our human bodies will experience serious heart problems. We already are finding 25 times the usual number of young males suffering from  myocarditis. 

    Infertility problems might not make themselves known for five to seven years.

    And of course since the people in power are not going to pull back the curtain and let the 42% of all Americans who have not yet figured out what a scam this all is, those beneath-contempt monsters like Fauci and Gates will continue to see to it that the real remedies for COVID and all corona viruses are withheld, so that every time a vaccine program produces yet another pandemic-extending variant, Big Pharma can come up with another vaccine program.

    So 2 weeks will become  2 years if we are lucky. And it could become 20 years if we are somehow able to escape the damage being done to our bodies thru the masking up, the locking down, the lack of a return to normalcy and economic, social, psychological damage, &  actual  physical harm that is being done to us not only as a nation but to all of humanity.

     

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  30. Roderic Reagan
    Roderic
    @rhfabian

    Bethany Mandel: Earlier this week, I reached a bit of a breaking point with COVID theatre in medical settings.

    If professional medical people think it’s necessary to act in certain ways maybe you should take that to heart and question your own assumptions.

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