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Note: See correction in final paragraph. In Arizona, when an attorney makes a mistake in a written document, they will file a document titled “Errata” which says what was wrong and corrects the record. Upon review, the WaPo headline was misleading. See my correction in the final paragraph. According to the Washington Post, Trump believes […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Disturbing Report Out of Hong Kong

 

It appears that the Communist regime is cracking down on the Hong Kong protesters with goon squads. Not sure this tactic will endear Hong Kong’s citizens to their Beijing overlords. Ever since the proposed extradition law that would send Hong Kong citizens to mainland China for trial and incarceration that was abandoned by the Hong Kong provisional government because of overwhelming protests in the streets, Beijing has been reportedly concerned of similar protests occurring in other Chinese provinces.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. The Squad Not Handling Fame Well

 

Whether intended or not, President Trump has effectively equated the Democrats with the far-left squad of freshman House leaders. And it’s not going well for the Team Donkey. Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (NY), Ilhan Omar (MN), Ayanna Pressley (MA), and Rashida Tlaib (MI) are polarizing figures, prone to unpopular stands bashing law enforcement, the flag, Israel, capitalism, and America herself.

The past few days have shown that the Squad isn’t handling the attention very well. Instead of moderating their views to better align with the voting majority, they are racing to the fringes … and giving Nancy Pelosi and Dem pollsters agita.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. ACF PoMoCon #6: Ben Sixsmith on Twitter Culture

 

Culture in the age of social media–here’s my conversation with writer Ben Sixsmith about the vast democratization of communications brought about by digital technology and the vast concentration of the public space in a handful of corporations. It’s not made us happy and good, but instead created new political conflicts and social drama. It’s an interesting time, but hardly bearable–so you might like some thoughts on Twitter, YouTube, and various other observations about what it’s like to be human plus digital. Also, if you’re interested in a fine read on British-Polish relations, Ben’s book is the thing for you!

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Reflections on a Hippy Wedding

 

Marie and I were married 56 years ago in her folks’ small living room in Albany, Oregon. The whole affair cost us 90 bucks: 25 bucks for the minister, 45 bucks for a ring for Marie, and 20 bucks for a marriage license. About 15 friends and family attended, standing room only. That’s all the living room could hold. Marie’s mother made us a wedding cake. I was wearing a borrowed tie and sport coat. Marie was wearing a white dress that she made herself.

We honeymooned in a motel alongside I-5 on our way back to Eugene, where we were students at the University of Oregon.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. It’s Boris, and Brexit, or Bust!

 

Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson, New York born British politician, will take on his new role of Prime Minister tomorrow afternoon.

But first, he became (I’m pretty sure), the first member of the British Conservative Party to work the honorific, “dude,” into a political speech.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Emotional Tail Wagging the Rational Dog

 

A couple of my relatively rare “conversations” have focused on great paragraphs that I have come across in my readings. (Great, and relevant, for various reasons but mainly because I say so.) Having featured Frederick Douglass and Victor Serge (with one by Milton Friedman still held in reserve), I came across one today that I will add to my list. This one by Daniel Kahneman. But first, the set-up…

…students of policy have noted that the availability heuristic helps explain why some issues are highly salient in the public’s mind while others are neglected. People tend to assess the relative importance of issues by the ease with which they are retrieved from memory — and this is largely determined by the extent of coverage in the media. Frequently mentioned topics populate the mind even as others slip away from awareness. In turn, what the media choose to report corresponds to their view of what is currently on the public’s mind. It is no accident that authoritarian regimes exert substantial pressure on independent media. – Pages 8-9

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The Quote of the Day is the easiest way to start a fun conversation on Ricochet. You don’t have to be intelligent, pithy, or eloquent yourself. You can share a written passage that you find interesting, or even something from a favorite movie. You can present the naked quote, or add your thoughts on how […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. “Send Her Back!” – Speaking Truth to Power

 

I apologize for the corny title of this post, but it most succinctly gets the point across.

I also apologize for failing to take part in what must have been a dozen lively threads about Trump vs. The Squad. One point I haven’t heard anyone making is that Mrs. Omar is not a victim, abused and intimidated by evil Trump supporters. She is not the enslaved woman in the old drawing, her hands in the pose of the supplicant, asking, “Am I not a woman and a sister?” She is much higher than that and much lower. More exalted, and more despised. In a word, she is a politician. A member of the U.S. House of Representatives, who sits on three Congressional committees, and in a number of caucuses. It is probably safe to say that she has more power in the allegedly white supremacist United States than any of the individuals in that crowd, chanting for her to be sent back. Whether one agrees with the sentiment or not, the crowd was punching up; not down.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I wish our President were a little more self-controlled in his speech, but it seems to me that there is a significant difference between, on the one hand, a man — even a President — who is prone to spouting off ungraciously, and, on the other hand, virtually an entire national press and punditry united […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Congressional Resolutions Are Not Law But They Are Not Harmless

 

Ilhan Omar, a supporter of the Boycott, Divest and Sanction movement, has decided that the government needs to protect its citizens—from our government. House Resolution 496, passed last week, claimed that the government was going to stop citizens from boycotting! In fact, it states as much:

Whereas despite this tradition, governments and nongovernmental organizations alike have sought to criminalize, stigmatize, and delegitimize the use of boycotts in an attempt to stifle constitutionally protected political expression . . .

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. This Week’s Book Review – Final Frontier

 

I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) After my review appears on Sunday, I post the previous week’s review here on Sunday.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I don’t remember the first time I saw a taiko drumming performance. It was mesmerizing. Part of my fascination might have been my involvement with Zen Buddhism (although there is no direct relationship); the practice requires incredible strength and coordination, and is a type of meditation, between body and soul, the player and the drum, […]

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Member Post

 

This was a #1 song in 1963. It was a cover for Ugly Woman, written in 1933 by Rafael de Leon, a calypso lyricist and performer from Trinidad. More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Introducing Habitual Hero

 
Pedro Robinson

My oldest son, Pedro, has just started a new podcast, “Habitual Hero.” Here’s why:

Like a lot of young Americans, Pedro has had it up to here with the victim narrative. Although Jordan Peterson, Ben Shapiro, and others are doing a good job of refuting that narrative, Pedro believes there’s still something missing. Stories. Examples. Narratives about ordinary people who have lived their lives heroically, making courage and hard work a daily habit.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: “A God you understood . . .”

 

“Whatever you do, anyway, remember that these things are mysteries and that if they were such that we could understand them, they wouldn’t be worth understanding. A God you understood would be less than yourself.” — Flannery O’Connor, The Habit of Being

Flannery O’Connor (1925–1964) was an American writer and southern Catholic, whose novels and short stories are inhabited by some of the strangest characters you’ll meet in fiction: absurd, often violent, and frequently driven by a spiritual fervor. It seems that people either like her fiction, or they find themselves confused and repulsed by it. This is probably because one of her most-anthologized stories — the one you likely read in your high school literature courses — is “A Good Man is Hard to Find,” which is about a family road trip that ends in mass murder.

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When your kids get to that Moving age, the age of getting or changing jobs, marrying, and so on, the family may suddenly delve into the data on High School Rankings, as we’ve been doing this evening. These notes: We discovered that little old Cincinnati has the #1, #2, and #3 rated high schools in […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. College Debt: Don’t Even Think of Asking Me to Pay

 

Since everyone, including Presidential candidates, seem to be discussing canceling college debt, I was moved to offer some thoughts on the subject, none of which include canceling college debt, but some of which have been bandied about by grander conservative voices.

Now, my philosophy regarding this issue is simple: You made the deal, not the hardworking taxpayers who would be strapped with your “canceled” debt. Learn that lesson now; pay your own way.

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