Hoover Institution fellows Misha Auslin and John Yoo interview John Pomfret, the former Washington Post and Associated Press reporter in China. Pomfret discusses his response to an open letter in the Washington Post, signed by dozens of leading US foreign policy and China scholars, criticizing the Trump administration for making China “an enemy.” He explains “why the United States doesn’t need to return to a gentler China policy.”

 

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There are 8 comments.

  1. Arnold Falk Member

    A very educational podcast indeed. Thanks to both John Yoo and Misha Auslin, and of course John Pomfret. With regards to Mr. Pomfret, one can certainly observe the insights he offers as a former resident of China, and his long term study of that country.

    What I would like to know, and hear from others about their views on the subject, is why we continue to allow 300,000+ Chinese students in our best colleges and universities, most of whom are in STEM coursework. And, why we allow many graduates to work in important and technologically advanced US companies. Yes, many become American citizens, but many also return to China with all that they can carry in their minds or otherwise. This seems to me the most foolish policy of them all, and a total anachronism.

    Finally, I would like it explained to me why we should deal with China in any other but WTO terms. Why have a “trade deal” at all with a country whose policies towards us are counter to our interests, and as we witness their miserable record on human rights?

    • #1
    • July 30, 2019, at 2:06 AM PDT
    • 2 likes
  2. GadgetGal Thatcher

    Plenty of entertainment in that discussion!

    • #2
    • July 30, 2019, at 3:32 AM PDT
    • Like
  3. Al Kennedy Member

    As an American living in Japan, I am very interested in this topic, and was very happy to see Hoover dedicate a podcast to it. However I am very disappointed in the first few podcasts. I don’t think there should be any doubt about China’s desire to displace the United States as the predominant power in the western Pacific which is extremely negative for America’s security. There are dozens of important data points to support this. The discussions with the guests they have chosen do not take a position on this or leave you with any information on China’s strategic intent. I contrast their podcasts with the Conversations with Bill Kristol podcast with Aaron Friedberg who presents an insightful summary of the United Stares’ China relationship and China’s strategic goals. Friedberg is an important thinker who has been years ahead of his peers in addressing this topic. I have tremendous respect for John Yoo and think he is an outstanding legal scholar. However Mishi Auslin dominates the interviews and comes across as a pendant who is interviewing a person he would like to add to the Stanford faculty rather than on trying to explain the situation in Asia to the podcast’s listeners. He has not expressed any concern with China’s attempt to replace America as the supreme power in Asia and its negative impact on America’s security. John, who has a deep understanding of America’s security and what its strategy should be is relegated to second fiddle, and is not even allowed to play a tune on his fiddle. If this podcast doesn’t improve, Hoover should discontinue it.

    • #3
    • July 30, 2019, at 6:28 AM PDT
    • Like
  4. colleenb Member

    Enjoying the podcasts on this important topic. Would appreciate some more insight into the S. Korea and Japan disagreement.

    • #4
    • July 30, 2019, at 8:54 AM PDT
    • Like
  5. Tedley Member

    Al Kennedy (View Comment):

    However Mishi Auslin dominates the interviews and comes across as a pendant who is interviewing a person he would like to add to the Stanford faculty rather than on trying to explain the situation in Asia to the podcast’s listeners. He has not expressed any concern with China’s attempt to replace America as the supreme power in Asia and its negative impact on America’s security. John, who has a deep understanding of America’s security and what its strategy should be is relegated to second fiddle, and is not even allowed to play a tune on his fiddle.

    As another Japan resident and listener to this irregular podcast, I don’t quite get the same impression. I’ll have to pay more attention to see if I’m overlooking anything. That said, in regards to the overflight of Dokdo/Takeshima, per the most thorough news story I’ve read about it, Misha was much more well-informed regarding the incident and parties involved. 

    • #5
    • July 31, 2019, at 12:20 AM PDT
    • Like
  6. Tedley Member

    Arnold Falk (View Comment):

    What I would like to know, and hear from others about their views on the subject, is why we continue to allow 300,000+ Chinese students in our best colleges and universities, most of whom are in STEM coursework. And, why we allow many graduates to work in important and technologically advanced US companies. Yes, many become American citizens, but many also return to China with all that they can carry in their minds or otherwise. This seems to me the most foolish policy of them all, and a total anachronism.

    I don’t have any direct knowledge, but it’s my guess that colleges accept so many Chinese students since I think pay full tuition for their educations. As for the employment of Chinese in STEM jobs, until more American students decide to shift away from gender studies to STEM topics, companies probably cannot fill their vacant positions without Chinese (and Indian) graduates. 

    • #6
    • July 31, 2019, at 12:31 AM PDT
    • Like
  7. Al Kennedy Member

    Tedley (View Comment):

    Al Kennedy (View Comment):

    However Mishi Auslin dominates the interviews and comes across as a pendant who is interviewing a person he would like to add to the Stanford faculty rather than on trying to explain the situation in Asia to the podcast’s listeners. He has not expressed any concern with China’s attempt to replace America as the supreme power in Asia and its negative impact on America’s security. John, who has a deep understanding of America’s security and what its strategy should be is relegated to second fiddle, and is not even allowed to play a tune on his fiddle.

    As another Japan resident and listener to this irregular podcast, I don’t quite get the same impression. I’ll have to pay more attention to see if I’m overlooking anything. That said, in regards to the overflight of Dokdo/Takeshima, per the most thorough news story I’ve read about it, Misha was much more well-informed regarding the incident and parties involved.

    @Tedley, I always appreciate your comments. I’ll go back and and reassess if I have been too hard on Misha. I wasn’t impressed with his book The End of the Asian Century. Maybe I am being too hard on him.

    • #7
    • July 31, 2019, at 2:05 AM PDT
    • Like
  8. Al Kennedy Member

    Here is a relevant post from PowerLine 

    • #8
    • August 3, 2019, at 9:06 PM PDT
    • Like