Jeb?

 

In a column in the Washington Post headlined “Don’t Forget About Jeb,” Jennifer Rubin:

It is still not clear whether Jeb has the yen to run. But sometimes events come together in just the right sequence. Over the last year Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), for whom Jeb is a mentor, has hit the skids. This raises the real possibility that Rubio might not run in 2016 or if he does, could fade fast. Jeb would therefore not feel compelled to defer to his junior senator. Meanwhile, the government shutdown undermined the credentials of far-right senators, immigration reform is back on the radar and the party is searching for an affirmative agenda. Jeb may not have moved closer to the party, but the party is moving closer to him. And, most importantly, it may need a seasoned pro to take on the Clintons.

What about the Bush name? Well, Bush 43 has favorability ratings higher than the president. If Hillary Clinton is going to be the Democratic nominee, the elite media can hardly whine about “dynasty” politics. “Bush” may not be the hardship it once was for Jeb. There is also something to be said for someone with experience who has been elected twice in a swing state, but who is still a fresh face for many voters.

Jen may be on to something here, no?

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  1. Profile Photo Member
    @SteveSc

    We have to be able to do better than someone named Clinton and Bush.  No matter their qualifications or lack thereof…

    • #61
  2. Profile Photo Member
    @

    http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2014/01/15/Chamber-of-Commerce-Crossroads-Leaders-Raking-in-Millions-While-Waging-War-on-Tea-PartyI have a feeling the Chamber loves Jeb.

    • #62
  3. Profile Photo Contributor
    @PeterRobinson

    Holey moley!  Am looking over the comments on a plane with a veeery sloooow wifi connection, so I’ll keep this brief, but I honestly had no idea the response to Jeb would prove so overwhelmingly negative.

    I can understand the response to Jen Rubin.  She’s a friend, but–well, there’s no denying that she’s spilled a lot of ink lecturing the tea party as if it were a threat to the Republic, when I, like a lot of us here, am inclined to see the Tea Party as the salvation of the Republic.  But Jeb?  He cut taxes in Florida in eight years out of eight, enacted the first real school voucher program in the country–it’s limited, but he did better than nearly any other governor in taking on the teachers’ unions–and although he’s in favor of increasing legal immigration he stoutly opposes any amnesty.

    What gives?  Is it his big brother who’s the problem? Or Jeb himself?  And if the latter, how come?

    • #63
  4. Profile Photo Inactive
    @JCNielsen
    Peter Robinson:

    What gives?  Is it his big brother who’s the problem? Or Jeb himself?  And if the latter, how come? · 2 minutes ago

    Many reasons.  To be sure, his father and his brother did much to advance the cause of the Democrats, to the point that I cannot bring myself to vote for another Bush under any circumstance.  But on his own, (a) immigration, (b) Hillary adoration, (c) Common Core, and all of the things these (and many other) tendencies portend are the reasons.  He is more charming and probably more capable than his father and brother, which makes him more dangerous. 

    I swallowed hard and contributed to and voted for McCain.  I swallowed less hard and gave to Romney (though I’d like my money back).   I’ll contribute to any Republican candidate (other than Christie) who runs against Jeb.  I will never vote for him for President.  Ever.

    • #64
  5. Profile Photo Inactive
    @BrentB67

    Peter, I think this thread is pretty nice. Gov. Bush like his brother is an honorable man and successful governor of a huge state.

    The issue isn’t his stewardship of the sunshine state. The issue is the size and scope of the federal government. The most vocal and active folks on the right believe the federal government is the problem. Unaffordable entitlements, welfare state including Ag and corporate welfare, deficit, debt, central planning, Obamacare, NSA., etc.

    Gov Bush also like his brother believes government has a role in these matters. Those of us on the activist right do not. Any republican needs our heat and enthusiasm to carry the limited government message to the masses because the media will not. Jeb isn’t the guy.

    • #65
  6. Profile Photo Inactive
    @WhiskeySam
    Peter Robinson: Holey moley!  Am looking over the comments on a plane with a veeery sloooow wifi connection, so I’ll keep this brief, but I honestly had no idea the response to Jeb would prove so overwhelmingly negative.

    I can understand the response to Jen Rubin.  She’s a friend, but–well, there’s no denying that she’s spilled a lot of ink lecturing the tea party as if it were a threat to the Republic, when I, like a lot of us here, am inclined to see the Tea Party as the salvation of the Republic.  But Jeb?  He cut taxes in Florida in eight years out of eight, enacted the first real school voucher program in the country–it’s limited, but he did better than nearly any other governor in taking on the teachers’ unions–and although he’s in favor of increasing legal immigration he stoutly opposes any amnesty.

    What gives?  Is it his big brother who’s the problem? Or Jeb himself?  And if the latter, how come? · 16 minutes ago

    The Bush name comes with a lot of baggage.  I like them as people, but I can’t live through another Bush_administration.

    • #66
  7. Profile Photo Inactive
    @HeartofAmerica
    Peter Robinson: Holey moley!  Am looking over the comments on a plane with a veeery sloooow wifi connection, so I’ll keep this brief, but I honestly had no idea the response to Jeb would prove so overwhelmingly negative.

    What gives?  Is it his big brother who’s the problem? Or Jeb himself?  And if the latter, how come? · 9 minutes ago

    1) it’s a political dynasty thing…I think American’s are getting tired of the same families showing up on the same ballots over and over. New blood is needed.

    2) Florida Governor: old news…1997 is light years away in this mud-wrestling event that has become American politics.

    3) His recent comments indicate that he isn’t a fan of the tea party or anyone else who’s not establishment. More of the same old, same old.

    4) His candidacy won’t be about him and whether he’s the right guy for the job, the media will make it about 41 and 43 and all the sins that follow them.

    • #67
  8. Profile Photo Inactive
    @JCNielsen
    BrentB67

    *** Gov Bush also like his brother believes government has a role in these matters. Those of us on the activist right do not. Any republican needs our heat and enthusiasm to carry the limited government message to the masses because the media will not. Jeb isn’t the guy. · 1 minute ago

    Bingo.

    • #68
  9. Profile Photo Podcaster
    @EJHill
    Peter Robinson: What gives?  Is it his big brother who’s the problem? Or Jeb himself?  And if the latter, how come?

    Peter – Conservatives still believe in a Republic, not family dynasties.

    You want to build a private business and pass it on to your kids, fine. But not the White House.

    Jeb did his duty. The two Georges did their duty. Now they can go home.

    • #69
  10. Profile Photo Member
    @BereketKelile
    Danny Alexander: #6 Bereket

    What you write also captures Rick Perry’s attributes as well.  Including even your last sentence (i.e., Perry as another white Texas governor — I’m obviously not the first to throw that out there).  And I say this as someone who hopes Perry will give 2016 a shot.

    It seems to me Perry has some major challenges that Bush is glad he doesn’t have. His performance last time around was abysmal. I’m afraid he has been already cast as a wacky right-winger with enough gaffes to reinforce the perception.

    • #70
  11. Profile Photo Inactive
    @NickStuart

    In a country of 350,000,000 people we have to turn to someone because he’s a well-known name?

    No more Bushes. No more Clintons. No Obamas, Cheneys, Kennedys or other dynastic lampreys on the body politic.

    • #71
  12. Profile Photo Inactive
    @Casey

    Peter, the problem is that the good people of Ricochet think about politics way too much and end up convincing themselves of things they ought not.

    • #72
  13. Profile Photo Inactive
    @JCNielsen
    Casey: Peter, the problem is that the good people of Ricochet think about politics way too much and end up convincing themselves of things they ought not. · 0 minutes ago

    They ought, apparently, to convince themselves that yet another Bush is just what the party and, indeed, the nation needs.

    • #73
  14. Profile Photo Inactive
    @Leigh
    Nick Stuart: In a country of 350,000,000 people we have to turn to someone because he’s a well-known name?

    No more Bushes. No more Clintons. No Obamas, Cheneys, Kennedys or other dynastic lampreys on the body politic. · 7 minutes ago

    Adams?

    • #74
  15. Profile Photo Member
    @PatJefferson

    No. Because a country needs borders.

    • #75
  16. Profile Photo Member
    @Chris
    J.C. Nielsen

    Peter Robinson:

    What gives?  Is it his big brother who’s the problem? Or Jeb himself?  And if the latter, how come? · 2 minutes ago

    …  But on his own, (a) immigration, (b) Hillary adoration, (c) Common Core, and all of the things these (and many other) tendencies portend are the reasons.  

    Two thoughts.

    First, it’s bound to be McCain Redux.  Sure, he’s a great guy now, but let him get the nod and then Jeb goes from Hillary’s medal of whatever buddy to her chucking it over the fence at the Bush compound in front of 25 satellite trucks.  And just like McCain, he won’t want to “stoop” to fight her.

    Further, he gives off zero good vibes to the base (see above) while to the other side the name Bush =  “the guy we used to win congress in 2006, the presidency in 2008, and perhaps even the presidency in 2012”.  If we are running a Bush, Republicans of every stripe need to be willing to stand on broken glass on the street corners eight hours a day to sing his praises just to drown out the “a Bush is a Bush” meme.

    • #76
  17. Profile Photo Inactive
    @EThompson
    Peter Robinson:

    What gives?  

    There is an enormous amount of class resentment in this country and it is just as prevalent in the GOP as it is among ‘progressives.’

    • #77
  18. Profile Photo Member
    @ScottR
    BrentB67:

    ….Unaffordable entitlements, welfare state including Ag and corporate welfare, deficit, debt, central planning, Obamacare, NSA., etc.

    Gov Bush also like his brother believes government has a role in these matters. Those of us on the activist right do not.

    Brent, is there a candidate out there who thinks the fed gov’t has no role in entitlements, healthcare, the NSA?

    As I’ve said, there’s a lot of overstating of the disagreements. The dynasty critique I get. That’s fair. But is Jeb really all that different from Walker or Jindal or Perry or Daniels or, heck, even Cruz, when it comes to workable reforms of entitlements, of healthcare, of taxes? On the NSA there’s some bigger disagreements, but even there I’m betting there’s more showmanship than substance from most of these politicians, right and left. 

    • #78
  19. Profile Photo Inactive
    @Casey
    J.C. Nielsen

    Casey: Peter, the problem is that the good people of Ricochet think about politics way too much and end up convincing themselves of things they ought not. 

    They ought, apparently, to convince themselves that yet another Bush is just what the party and, indeed, the nation needs. 

    One ought not assume that the opposite of evaluating poorly is evaluating poorly oppositely.

    • #79
  20. Profile Photo Inactive
    @BrentB67
    Scott Reusser

    BrentB67:

    ….Unaffordable entitlements, welfare state including Ag and corporate welfare, deficit, debt, central planning, Obamacare, NSA., etc.

    Gov Bush also like his brother believes government has a role in these matters.Those of us on the activist right do not.

    Brent, is there a candidate out there who thinks the fed gov’t hasnorole in entitlements, healthcare, the NSA?

    As I’ve said, there’s a lot of overstating of the disagreements. The dynasty critique I get. That’s fair. But is Jeb really all that different from Walker or Jindal or Perry or Daniels or, heck, even Cruz, when it comes to workable reforms of entitlements, of healthcare, of taxes? On the NSA there’s some bigger disagreements, but even there I’m betting there’s more showmanship than substance from most of these politicians, right and left.  · 1 minute ago

    I can’t think of much Gov. Bush has in common with Gov. Perry or Ted Cruz.

    I respect your opinion about overstating disagreements, but I think there is more agreement between Jeb Bush and Hillary Clinton on domestic issues.

    • #80
  21. Profile Photo Coolidge
    @Skyler

    I will not vote for a continuation of the disastrous, socialist Bush dynasty. If there is no third party running, I will vote democrat just out of spite, or better yet, write myself in.

    • #81
  22. Profile Photo Podcaster
    @EJHill
    EThompson There is an enormous amount of class resentment in this country and it is just as prevalent in the GOP as it is among ‘progressives.’ · 

    Class my…. clavicle!

    • #82
  23. Profile Photo Coolidge
    @Spin

    I’m not smart enough to know why Ricochet doesn’t like Jeb, but I do know they don’t.  They are fickle bunch!

    Peter Robinson: Holey moley!  Am looking over the comments on a plane with a veeery sloooow wifi connection, so I’ll keep this brief, but I honestly had no idea the response to Jeb would prove so overwhelmingly negative.

    What gives?  Is it his big brother who’s the problem? Or Jeb himself?  And if the latter, how come? · 1 hour ago

    • #83
  24. Profile Photo Inactive
    @EThompson
    EJHill

    EThompson There is an enormous amount of class resentment in this country and it is just as prevalent in the GOP as it is among ‘progressives.’ · 

    Class my…. clavicle! · 1 minute ago

    We will have to agree to disagree. I refuse to get into an argument with somebody from whom I was hoping to get a photoshop tutorial.

    • #84
  25. Profile Photo Member
    @DannyAlexander

    #70 EThompson

    “[C]lass resentment” — riiiiight…

    That’s a red herring, strawman — call it what you will, in any case an erroneous diversion — if I ever saw one.

    See EJHill’s earlier comment.

    ET, I like a great deal of what you have to say, but you’re off the mark here (unless your comment was actually meant to be satirical?…), and impugning supposed/alleged motives — instead of examining actions, on both sides — debases the discourse.

    • #85
  26. Profile Photo Inactive
    @Casey
    Skyler:  If there is no third party running, I will vote democrat just out of spite, or better yet, write myself in. 

    Tippecanoe and Skyler Too

    • #86
  27. Profile Photo Inactive
    @swatter

    If Hillary, then Jeb would be the only one to take her out. Doesn’t it seem inevitable to have another Bush-Clinton free-for-all?

    Personally, I don’t want another Clinton nor Bush, but what I want, I seldom get in politics.

    Who do the Republicans have in their stable to counter the Clinton juggernaut? I think Cruz but hey, the mainstream and brylcreem Republicans don’t like backbone.

    • #87
  28. Profile Photo Member
    @9thDistrictNeighbor

    I’ll chime in on Jeb and his alleged education credentials. Two words: Common Core. If you are not very familiar with the nuts and bolts of common core, head over to Michelle Malkin or do any quick internet search and carefully read what you find. I could go on about the real dangers of the Common Core–and that is not hyperbole. Jeb Bush supports vouchers with his right hand while holding Common Core up as the solution with his left. Common Core seeks to obliterate the need or desire for vouchers or school choice, for when we are like France or Germany with every student suffering the tyranny of low expectations at every school each day vouchers, school choice, parochial or private schools will be meaningless. Go back and reread Marc Tucker’s NCEE letter to Hillary…Common Core redux. No Jeb, No way.

    • #88
  29. Profile Photo Inactive
    @BarbaraKidder
    Leigh

    Nick Stuart: In a country of 350,000,000 people we have to turn to someone because he’s a well-known name?

    No more Bushes. No more Clintons. No Obamas, Cheneys, Kennedys or other dynastic lampreys on the body politic. · 7 minutes ago

    Adams? · 53 minutes ago

    Yes!

    Roosevelt? 

    No!

    • #89
  30. Profile Photo Member
    @ScottR
    BrentB67

    Scott Reusser

     

    But is Jeb really all that different from Walker or Jindal or Perry or Daniels or, heck, even Cruz, when it comes to workable reforms of entitlements, of healthcare, of taxes?

    I can’t think of much Gov. Bush has in common with Gov. Perry or Ted Cruz.

     

    Entitlements: Moving to defined contribution (rather than defined benefit) in Medicare (i.e., the Ryan Plan, in essence), plus introducing some privatization to SS (if possible; W failed) while raising retirement age and being open to means-testing, block-granting Medicaid to the states to encourage reform (Ryan again).

    Healthcare: Allowing purchase of insurance across state lines, tort reform, promote HSA’s, encouraging state-level reforms to address pre-existing condition problems (likely state-level risk pools), eliminate the tax disadvantage of non-employer-based insurance.

    Taxes: Simplifying and flattening the code as much as politically possible, eliminating and/or capping deductions.

    Perry, Cruz, and Bush would agree on all or most of this agenda, best I can tell. 

    Hillary would resist it all, with the possible exception of a flatter tax code on the order of Bowles-Simpson.

    • #90
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