Tag: Law Enforcement

Virginia’s Youngkin Wins First Debate

 

Virginia Republicans last May put their faith in a first-time candidate for public office, Glenn Youngkin, as their nominee for Governor in the state’s odd-year general election on November 2nd. They chose him over more experienced political veterans such as former House Speaker Kirk Cox, State Senator Amanda Chase, and long-time GOP supporter and candidate Pete Snyder.

Choosing a novice candidate is risky, especially when running against a long-time political pro and former governor like Terry McAuliffe. But Virginia’s GOP saw in Youngkin what I did when first meeting him in December 2020 – the best natural candidate I’ve ever met. And I’ve worked in over 35 congressional and US Senate campaigns in 25 states over a quarter-century, where I’ve done my share of helping negotiate debates, coach candidates, and conduct mock debates.

So many Republicans were no doubt a little trepidatious of tonight’s gubernatorial debate at Appalachian Law School in Grundy, Virginia in the Commonwealth’s far southwest corner, bordering Kentucky and West Virginia. They need not have been. Youngkin won the contest.

Member Post

 

Things have been going steadily south for law enforcement and the average citizen of Washington. After over a decade of demonizing law enforcement officers – which ramped up significantly last year – Washington passed law enforcement legislation with little regard for how the details would ultimately be interpreted or what they would mean for the […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Ayaan talks with Detective Chris Boughey about honor killings in the United States. Detective Boughey describes the 2009 killing of Noor Almaleki by her father. He explains the role the family plays during honor violence cases and the reasons behind honor killings.

Detective Boughey is currently assigned as a Detective in the Major Crimes Unit in the criminal investigation sector of the Peoria PD. He investigates homicides, robberies, in-custody deaths, and more.

Member Post

 

You get off the phone with someone you love, who’s just been handed that straw for her overloaded camel, and you can’t do anything, and you just need to rant. My sister is one of the best people you could ever meet. Though life has thrown some really difficult trials and challenges at her in […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

The debate over whether protests in the cities across America are riots or peaceful protests is a fool’s errand. In fact, it is a worthless exercise that completely misses the point in studying these activities. Our country is being attacked, ransacked and burned down. Do we think any of those small business owners who spent […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

The Last Bad Choice He’ll Make

 

We had an incident here in Polk County that involved a lethal shooting. In many other communities, there would have been shouting about gun control, and the shooter would have at least been arrested. Not in Polk County.

Here’s what happened: Two couples went out for the evening. At the end of the date, the two fellows drove the two women to one of the women’s homes. The fellows drove off after one of the couples had a bitter discussion, after which the two women entered the home.

Member Post

 

One of the more common things I remember seeing on Reason and various Balko article was police killing dogs. Given how often it popped up, I wondered what the deal was. Yeah, some people have very dangerous guard dogs, but some of the cases were yappers. It kept up popping up over and over. For […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

“Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God. Whosoever therefore resisteth the power, resisteth the ordinance of God: and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation. For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Black Lives Matter Goes Mainstream?

 

Last week, Julie Pace of the Associated Press was on Fox News’ Special Report with Bret Baer. She made a statement that stopped me in my tracks. (I seem to be doing a lot of that lately.) She said, “Black Lives Matter has gone mainstream.”

I asked myself what she could possibly have meant, and when I did a little research, I realized the insidious nature of her comment, and how we are in the process of making Black Lives Matter a mainstream movement.

“We Are Leaving,” Says Police Officer

 

I’ve been puzzled that while the media, corporate America, and others are hyper-focusing on the relationship between law enforcement and the Black community across much of the US, it’s all been mostly one-side; focused only on what many in the black community have experienced and feel. And now, it’s morphed into “defund the police.”

The stories and “the conversation” are important. But what about the other side – the people who protect and serve our communities?

Law-Enforcement Officers Exhibit Less Malice and Fewer Major Errors than Other Professions

 

How many bad cops are there? What is the percentage? According to this: “In 2018, there were 686,665 full-time law enforcement officers employed in the United States.” What is the percentage of truly bad cops? How does that compare with the percentage of bad sports figures? How does that compare with the percentage of media figures who do not do their jobs or harass coworkers? How does that compare with the number and percentage of soi disant journalists who make up facts or interviews or get their data from kids’ science projects where the kids made up the numbers?

Let’s face it, if a law-enforcement officer does something bad, reporters will report on it, even if it does not involve the death of a black man. How many of these do we hear about in a year? A handful? Is it even that high? Or is that the number over several years where the stories have stuck with us and the stories told over and over and blown out of proportion? The Ferguson Unrest (as it is referred to in Wikipedia) was in 2014. How about the original “I can’t breathe!” Eric Garner who died while being arrested for selling loosies on the streets of New York City? That was 2011. We seem to be getting one of these major incidents about every three years. Whatever your profession is, can you say that you have one major incident every three years per 650,000 employees? Is your profession’s record that low? Does your profession have so few scandals? Medical doctors don’t. Priests don’t. Teachers don’t. Politicians sure as shootin’ don’t.

Teri has finally dragged the original Smart Girl, Stacy Mott, back into the fold. Stacy explains where she’s been the last six years, and the girls reminisce about the past — including their funny weekend with Andrew Breitbart. They also talk about how tea party rallies compare to today’s rally-riots and how we get past the divide.

Member Post

 

There was a #BLM-inspired riot in Newburgh, NY the other day. A man who shot at police and wounded one was shot and killed by an officer. So as to “allay community concerns” the Newburgh department released stills from bodycam footage, to demonstrate that this was not an “unarmed black man” thing, but it made […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Save the Jews, the Christians – Civilization?

 

I caught the tail end of two Wall Street Journal journalists talking about the recent attacks on Jews in New York, and since WSJ is behind a paywall, I cannot find the segment.  But what I heard burned into my memory.  One said that this is a “mirror of what is going on in European cities, and has been for some time.” They stated the Jews are the canary in the coal mine, a cliche that has been echoed over and over to deaf ears. This has religious implications, but they said the “resurgence of antisemitism is a symptom that society as a whole is breaking down,” and concluded with “when that happens on a large scale, people choose camps, and a peaceful, cohesive society erodes and falls apart and all you are left with are warring camps.”

Is that what we are witnessing, in New York and elsewhere, when moral boundaries are removed? I’m not just speaking of the decline in church attendance, in Jews becoming more secular, but in the overall protections and safety nets that we once relied on. When we had boundaries, we relied on law enforcement, respect for property, differences of opinion, lifestyles, and it went both ways, instead of hurling hate speech and condemning one idea over another. We respected boundaries, which also included protecting children from overly sexual content. Law enforcement is now spat upon, doused with water, and shouted at with vulgarity. Wearing a MAGA hat in public can get you tossed out of a restaurant or pummeled, because of political differences. We now have something called gender fluidity.

Petty crimes such as theft, drug possession, and home invasions, are now considered low priority with no consequences. More states are following lockstep, the predicted outcome of legalizing marijuana for recreational purposes. Drugged up, more brazen attacks – we’re witnessing an erosion of civilization, not like a drip, drip that eventually carves out a solid rock over decades, but a powerful wave that erodes swiftly and mercilessly.

New Jersey Sheriff Sues the New Jersey Attorney General

 

We need to see more men like Sheriff Robert Nolan taking action against the injustice of creating sanctuary states. He’s suing the New Jersey AG, who’s defying federal law in order to turn New Jersey into a sanctuary state, and Nolan wants no part of it. So Sheriff Nolan and Cape May County’s Board of Chosen Freeholders are suing in federal court to challenge their AG’s directive, barring Nolan and his officers from cooperating with ICE.

The actions of Attorney General Grewel are blatantly political. He’s using worn-out rhetoric and misleading his constituents. He points out that the law enforcement officers are supposed to enforce state criminal offenses, and the federal government is supposed to handle immigration violations. And his stated concern is insulting to the intelligence of his own officers:

Although state, county, and local law enforcement officers should assist federal immigration authorities when required to do so by law, they should also be mindful that providing assistance above and beyond those requirements threatens to blur the distinctions between state and federal actors and between federal immigration law and state criminal law. It also risks undermining the trust we have built with the public. (italics are mine)

Antifa Is Not the Problem

 

Members of Antifa march in Portland, Oregon, in this August 4, 2018, photo from shutterstock.com

Last week, Republican Congressman Jim Banks responded to the Antifa violence in Portland with the following tweet:

Trumping Middle East Hands: Iran [Updated]

 

Start from the position that the Iranian people are hostages in their own country to a regime based on an idea, perhaps an ideology, concocted in the 1970s and propounded clearly only after Khomeini’s faction had control in the Iranian Revolution of 1979. Consider that there has been popular unrest against the regime. Factor in that the rulers are savvy and ruthless, with an elite military force keeping the regular military and the populace in check, while extending regime influence regionally and globally. The Khomeinists seem to have a strong hand, with some high cards, so how do we set about trumping their hand? Moving towards answers that are feasible takes more than hand-waving and posturing.

The U.S. military has long recognized that it was only one instrument in Uncle Sam’s tool belt, and that military strategy needed to be integrated with plans and actions by the rest of the government. This became called a “whole of government” approach. For many years, military officers, in their advanced schooling, were instructed in consideration of four “instruments of national power:” Diplomacy, Information, Military, and Economy (DIME).

DIME was useful for getting officers with around twenty years of military planning and operations under their belts to think more broadly. However, Uncle Sam actually has a larger set of tools, and uses them. To capture these other tools, DIME became DIMEFIL: