Tag: Law Enforcement

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As I write this, Officer Cem Duzel of the Colorado Springs Police Department is fighting for his life. He was shot early Thursday morning and rushed to the hospital, where he is in critical condition. The Colorado Springs Police Department sent out a tweet regarding the instance, asking the media to respect Officer Duzel’s family’s […]

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Former NYPD and LAPD commissioner William J. Bratton joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss Bratton’s 40-plus-year career in law enforcement, the lessons learned in New York and Los Angeles, and the challenges facing American police.

Bratton began his career in Boston, where he joined the police department in 1970 after serving three years in the U.S. Army’s Military Police during the Vietnam War. He was named chief of the New York City Transit Police in 1990, where he oversaw dramatic crime reductions in the subway system. In 1994, newly elected mayor Rudy Giuliani appointed Bratton commissioner of the NYPD. From 2002 to 2009, Bratton served as Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department. In 2014, he was again named New York City Police Commissioner by Mayor Bill de Blasio, before stepping down in 2016.

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Andrew C. McCarthy on Russiagate, Clinton-Trump Investigation Double Standards, Mueller’s Mandate, DOJ-FBI-CIA Politicization (Part II) http://traffic.libsyn.com/bigideaswithben/20180530_Andy_McCarthy_Interview_Part_2.vF.mp3 With Michael Horowitz’s IG Report due out this afternoon, I just released Part II of my in-depth conversation for the Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten podcast with former federal prosecutor and National Review contributor par excellence Andrew C. McCarthy. […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Caution: Using This Product Against Armed Citizens Might Result in Injury or Death

 

A video showing an armed plainclothes Brazilian police woman fighting back against an armed attacked has gone viral and is popping up all over my social media feed. My friend John Corriea breaks down the video from a tactical perspective on his YouTube channel, but caution: There is no blood shown, however, someone does wind up assuming room temperature. The video itself and how’s it’s gone viral, though, have some interesting implications for the larger efforts to fight back against gun control and keep and expand our right to self-defense.

One of the methods currently used by those opposed to the right of self defense is the proven strategy of making guns “uncool,” and holding gun manufacturers liable for their misuse, which is essentially the same methods used against the tobacco companies to limit the use of their products.

One of the examples of this strategy in the fight against private ownership of guns is the efforts to repeal the Protection in Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, (PLCAA) which shields firearms manufacturers from frivolous lawsuits designed to drive them out of business, such as the lawsuit brought against online ammo seller Lucky Gunner by the parents of a victim of the Aurora theater shooter, implying somehow that Lucky Gunner was liable because they somehow knew beforehand that their ammo was going to used in such a horrific manner. Due in part to the PLCAA, the suit was dismissed by Judge Richard P. Matsch, who also order the plaintiffs to pay a healthy chunk of Lucky Gunner’s legal fees (which Lucky Gunner later earmarked for use by gun rights organizations (*sniff*… I love a happy ending…).*

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Since April 12, 2018, five American Law Enforcement Officers (LEO’s) have been shot and killed in the line of duty. Let that sink in. Five in two weeks. When you visit the Officer Down Memorial Page you will find that 46 LEO’s have lost their lives since January 1st. Some have been killed in automobile […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Putting a Face on Law Enforcement

 

As we drove home on Friday from Gainesville, we heard the news that two cops had been killed in Trenton, FL. It turns out that Trenton is in Gilchrist County and wasn’t far from where we were driving.

The two cops were dining in a Chinese restaurant in Trenton on a lunch break. Their names were Sgt. Noel Ramirez, 30, married and father of two, and Deputy Taylor Lindsey, 25, who had a girlfriend. The shooter walked into the restaurant and killed them both, then killed himself inside his car.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Randomness: On David French’s Quest to De-Risk Crime

 

As a fellow Iraq war vet, I deeply respect the service and perspective of National Review columnist David French. He volunteered out of a sense of obligation to serve in a war he had endorsed. The man put his rear end where his mouth had put others. That he was “inside the wire” as a legal advisor should be beside the point. He risked much more than any pundit. Oh, but that he would do the same with his punditry on policing. On this Mr. French is consistently, dangerously wrong.

I have spent much of three decades observing, reporting on, and training in police work. That study is further informed by my tours as an infantry officer in Iraq and Afghanistan. And the lessons I’ve learned are clear: Mr. French’s ideas will get good people killed by shifting the risk of criminality off of the lawless. Sadly, his effort to de-risk criminality hit a nadir with his column on the death of Stephon Clark.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Law Enforcement Tackles Mental Illness

 

In the last few months, in fact for years, many of us have lamented the conditions of the mentally ill. Once we freed them from institutions, we condemned many of them to lives of uncertainty, isolation and in some cases violence. Although we decry those decisions, very little has been done to work with the mentally ill in ways that are practical and helpful, not just for those who are ill, but those who have to encounter them daily.

One local law enforcement agency in Florida is developing a program to help the mentally ill who are incarcerated; in addition, there are nationwide programs to deal with this serious issue of mental illness, its effects on the community and on law enforcement itself.

In Polk County, FL, Sheriff Grady Judd has called the local jails “…the largest mental health facility in the county.” That’s a pretty powerful charge to make, not only about our jail system but about those who suffer from mental illness.

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Surely Congress and the President care at least as much about children as they do about the environment. Is a school shooting at least as terrible as an oil spill? Then why do public officials, including military commanders, face personal liability for violations of environmental law, while law enforcement leaders face no real personal consequences […]

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  Since that fateful day of the Stoneman Douglas school shooting in Parkland, FL, a hornet’s nest has been stirred, and it’s long overdue. President Trump is hearing from all sides, hosting law enforcement, governors, as well as students and parents. I heard on the radio part of his discussion with Diane Feinstein and other […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Ever Get the Feeling You’ve Been Cheated, Jake?

 

Jake, for some time now, you’ve been one of the few mainstream media reporters I could tolerate, because you seemed like you played it straight. I may not always agree with how you presented the news, but it seemed like you took the time to try to understand both sides and let that understanding guide your stories.

So my question for you is this: When did you find out that a Broward County Sheriff’s Deputy stood by at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and did nothing as 17 children were slaughtered? Was it before the town hall, or after it? Would have moderated this Two Minutes Hate had you known that it was cowardice that led to this slaughter, not one particular style of gun? Would you have let Sheriff Lobo Israel run roughshod over Dana Loesch knowing that the incompetency of his department had a direct impact on the scope of the slaughter?

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A story in the news this morning highlighted new challenges that law enforcement now face in states with legalized pot. They said the uptick in vehicle accidents due to drivers high on pot should come as no surprise. Stores selling marijuana in all forms have lines round the corner, and this is before they received […]

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I live and work in Chicago. I regularly see reports of criminal activity around my workplace, which bans guns, naturally. I carry various items for self-defense, such as a long flashlight or pocketknife. However, it seems like self-defense starts at a more fundamental level. Obviously, we do not walk around assuming every person is going […]

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Congressman Steve Scalise returned to work today – barely a headline. He was injured on a ball field over three months ago, part of a heinous act of hate, toward the Republican team. Miracles happen. His speech today was a testimony to all that makes America the magnificent country it is, especially his last comment: […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Berkeley Cowers from Campus Violence

 

Do you remember hearing last year about the special door for the Berkeley university chancellor’s office that was built to protect him and his staff from potentially dangerous protestors? You probably didn’t. But the Wall Street Journal “outed” them last week. According to the WSJ,

In a proposal requesting funding for the $9,000 security door, the chancellor’s office detailed the risk of ‘vandalism & malicious mischief’ and a ‘high . . . level of probability of future loss or injury if [the] condition is not addressed.’ The proposal noted that protesters had ‘rushed the building and attempted to occupy’ the chancellor’s office in April 2015. ‘Staff people pushed to close the office doors while protestors pushed them open.’

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Rich McFadden of Radio America applaud Congress for their decision to not allow yesterday’s shooting to cancel the Congressional Baseball Game, a tradition held since 1909. They also express their overwhelming disgust at the New York Times editorial board for publishing an egregious article which falsely claims that political motives caused the 2011 shooting of Rep. Gabby Giffords. And they voice their disbelief at law enforcement officials who ignored the numerous warning signs that pointed towards the Alexandria shooter’s potential for future violence.

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I would like to solicit the assistance of Ricochet’s former and current law enforcement officers on the matter of avoiding being by a police officer. Now, I know that you are honorable and dedicated members of law enforcement with the experience to tell when it right to use lethal force. Unfortunately, citizens don’t have the […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Two Sides Fighting Terror

 

praying-mosqueFor years many of us have been saying that the Muslim leaders in the US must actively speak out against terrorism. We have also heard of Muslim leaders who profess to oppose terrorism and insist that they do not harbor recruits or recruiters of terrorism.

Imagine my disappointment as I learn that mosques may not be screening for jihadis. According to Robert Spencer at Jihad Watch, who has been tracking mosques who report to the authorities, “…mosques are not putting jihadis out, or making it clear that they are unwelcome, or, for the most part, reporting them to authorities when they learn of what they’re doing.”

In contrast, a counterterrorism program in Dearborn led by its Police Chief Ron Haddad, has shown success in identifying potential terrorists: